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Old 09-04-2016, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,187 posts, read 1,423,307 times
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I haven't been following this thread, so I apologize if this post is repetitive. But ... while I think it is perfectly fine for people to be into this topic, how many of us think that the number and relative "fashionability" of boutique shoppes in our home town is super-important. Again, this is not a criticism, but it's just something I wonder about.

On a related note, I live in an area of Houston that has most of the high-prestige, expensive, fancy stores. They have proliferated recently. I find myself wondering how they stay in business. But ... somehow they do, including the ones that have been here longer, such as in the Houston Galleria.

I haven't spent much time in Dallas over the last few years. Are the upscale stores busier there or do they also seem to survive without apparently having many customers?
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Old 09-05-2016, 05:10 PM
 
23 posts, read 34,418 times
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It's the same in Dallas. But think of it this way--

Heremes sells purses for $48,000. If they sell 1 per week that is almost $200,000 per month or $2.4 million per year.
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:29 PM
 
439 posts, read 438,460 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
I haven't been following this thread, so I apologize if this post is repetitive. But ... while I think it is perfectly fine for people to be into this topic, how many of us think that the number and relative "fashionability" of boutique shoppes in our home town is super-important. Again, this is not a criticism, but it's just something I wonder about.

On a related note, I live in an area of Houston that has most of the high-prestige, expensive, fancy stores. They have proliferated recently. I find myself wondering how they stay in business. But ... somehow they do, including the ones that have been here longer, such as in the Houston Galleria.

I haven't spent much time in Dallas over the last few years. Are the upscale stores busier there or do they also seem to survive without apparently having many customers?
A bloodbath could take place in luxury retail shopping during the next few years. It happened during the oil bust of the eighties. The traditional luxury shopping centers in central Dallas put the new up and coming luxury shopping centers built in North Dallas in their place during the late eighties / early ninties.
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:12 PM
 
13,194 posts, read 28,334,098 times
Reputation: 13142
Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
I haven't spent much time in Dallas over the last few years. Are the upscale stores busier there or do they also seem to survive without apparently having many customers?
The really upscale boutiques (Valentino, Chanel, etc) are rarely busy at all but still do big $$$ business. Many of these boutiques' top clients don't even step foot in the physical shops- the boutiques send trunks directly to the clients' homes or they work through personal shoppers.

The dependence upon a tiny subset of the pipulation is amazing. 10% of the downtown Neiman's sales come from ONE customer who lives in Arkansas.
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Old 09-06-2016, 02:08 PM
bu2
 
24,116 posts, read 14,934,661 times
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This thread brings this link to mind: Zoning shrinks the economy, TX cities as people, Astrodome, appreciating townhomes, helping homeless, and more - Opportunity Urbanist
.
Finally, a little humor from George Rogers, who recently visited Houston from Chicago:
If Texas cities were people
Collin County (North Dallas): A Dad trying to be cool.
Austin: A Hipster trying to be cool. Lives at Urban Outfitters.
Fort Worth: Urban Cowboy.
San Antonio: Fort Worth’s tejano buddy.
Houston: A nerdy kid that doesn’t care about being cool.
Dallas: A dudebro that blows money at Neiman Marcus.
El Paso: Isn’t that in New Mexico?
.
Dallas: I’m cool because I blew 500 dollars at Neiman Marcus.
Austin: I’m cool because I blew 500 dollars at Urban Outfitters.
Houston: What is cool anyways?
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:33 AM
 
439 posts, read 438,460 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
The really upscale boutiques (Valentino, Chanel, etc) are rarely busy at all but still do big $$$ business. Many of these boutiques' top clients don't even step foot in the physical shops- the boutiques send trunks directly to the clients' homes or they work through personal shoppers.

The dependence upon a tiny subset of the pipulation is amazing. 10% of the downtown Neiman's sales come from ONE customer who lives in Arkansas.
I am not a believer in e commerce. Instead, I think the young ladies are going to make their way back out in the sun, walking along the streets, wearing the sunglasses, and swinging designer shop bags. Never invest against human nature. This is why I think another bloodbath is about to take place in retail.
The are of downtown with the original Neiman Marcus, the new Forty-Five-Ten, and the Joule Hotel is sitting pretty.
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Old 09-07-2016, 03:31 PM
 
439 posts, read 438,460 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiddenValley View Post
It's the same in Dallas. But think of it this way--

Heremes sells purses for $48,000. If they sell 1 per week that is almost $200,000 per month or $2.4 million per year.
Thanks for the insight. However, Houston and Dallas are not the same. The level of competition in retail of each is not in the same league. It never has been. I'm not going to say which is better. Let me just say that while Houston's airports are more tuned to the energy business, the airports in Dallas are tuned to retail. Have you noticed how the passenger traffic at Love Field has been zooming lately?

I can remember reading a few decades back that DFW airport served a surrounding market of 650,000 millionaires. I imagine that number today is closer to a million.
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Old 09-07-2016, 04:28 PM
 
13,194 posts, read 28,334,098 times
Reputation: 13142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow pool of piddle View Post
I am not a believer in e commerce. Instead, I think the young ladies are going to make their way back out in the sun, walking along the streets, wearing the sunglasses, and swinging designer shop bags. Never invest against human nature. This is why I think another bloodbath is about to take place in retail.
The are of downtown with the original Neiman Marcus, the new Forty-Five-Ten, and the Joule Hotel is sitting pretty.
This is not a new thing though. Back when I worked for a top luxury retailer in NYC back in the early 2000's, we always loaded up trunks to send to clients who never set foot in our store. And that was back when Neiman's was running the Michael Kors and David Yurman websites because those companies didn't believe in EComm at all. This is a really rich person shopping process that is not related to ecomm at all.

And fwiw, Forty-Five Ten's move downtown is going to be nothing but carnage for the downtown Neiman's. DT is already running a sales decrease for the 2nd or 3rd straight year.
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Old 09-07-2016, 09:17 PM
 
439 posts, read 438,460 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
This is not a new thing though. Back when I worked for a top luxury retailer in NYC back in the early 2000's, we always loaded up trunks to send to clients who never set foot in our store. And that was back when Neiman's was running the Michael Kors and David Yurman websites because those companies didn't believe in EComm at all. This is a really rich person shopping process that is not related to ecomm at all.

And fwiw, Forty-Five Ten's move downtown is going to be nothing but carnage for the downtown Neiman's. DT is already running a sales decrease for the 2nd or 3rd straight year.
I have a few questiins. When you say downtown is suffering a sales decrease, do you mean the original Neiman Marcus depatment store? I consider Forty-Five-Ten to be, out of the blue, something on a similar level to a new Neiman Marcus. They look gorgeous together in their downtown location. What is going to become of their store on McKinney in Knox Park? And what about the planned Sams across Central Expressway? I was reading recently about the tremendous upside to Henderson Avenue and its sweet location. They are saying that it is located in the perfect vacuum. Won't that Sams work to suck the life out of near east Dallas?
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Old 09-07-2016, 09:56 PM
 
13,194 posts, read 28,334,098 times
Reputation: 13142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow pool of piddle View Post
I have a few questiins. When you say downtown is suffering a sales decrease, do you mean the original Neiman Marcus depatment store? I consider Forty-Five-Ten to be, out of the blue, something on a similar level to a new Neiman Marcus. They look gorgeous together in their downtown location. What is going to become of their store on McKinney in Knox Park? And what about the planned Sams across Central Expressway? I was reading recently about the tremendous upside to Henderson Avenue and its sweet location. They are saying that it is located in the perfect vacuum. Won't that Sams work to suck the life out of near east Dallas?
Yes, the downtown Neiman's has had sales decreased approaching double-digits over the last few years. The store needs a major remodel and better assortments. You really would think they'd be more proactive with FFT
literally moving in across the street. I wouldn't even choose to eat at the Zodiac Room anymore with FFT's T Room as an option.

The FFT store should be spectacular. Brian Bolke has always had such a great vision and bringing Taylor Tomasi-Hill and Nick Wooster (two international street style stars with mega industry credentials) on board this year was a blockbuster move. The McKinney store will close. FFT's Five & Ten store in HPV just converted to TTHxFFT with Taylor Tomasi-Hill curating an assortment of up and coming designers and broader price points. They are also opening a 2nd location in Houston's new River Oaks District.
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