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Old 05-30-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Northeast Texas
816 posts, read 1,812,278 times
Reputation: 555

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
The Hill Country and central Texas both have some beautiful scenery but let's get real - those regions are a LOT drier than east Texas.
Eastern side Texas don't even look like they're in a drought to me as far as observation goes, but oh well.

I don't really understand the map. If East Texas and West Texas were both in exceptional drought, do they both need the same amount of rainfall, or would that be East Texas needing more rain since East Texas gets far more rain than West Texas in terms of annual precipitation?
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Old 05-30-2014, 02:53 PM
 
Location: The Dirty South.
1,608 posts, read 1,731,284 times
Reputation: 1196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Why is that the least bit funny that Dallas is trying to steal private land by imminent domain when its over 120 miles outside of Dallas County in an entirely different region of the state? Go get your own water *******s.

I don't find it humorous at all, I find it ****ing pathetic they're stealing our water to keep their lawns manicured & to fill up their dried up creek beds downtown so more businesses will move there.
Its funny because dallas is so close to east texas. But yet doesn't get as much rain. You took it the wrong way. No need to get worked up.
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Old 05-30-2014, 03:28 PM
 
2,989 posts, read 4,371,032 times
Reputation: 1871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Why is that the least bit funny that Dallas is trying to steal private land by imminent domain when its over 120 miles outside of Dallas County in an entirely different region of the state? Go get your own water *******s.

I don't find it humorous at all, I find it ****ing pathetic they're stealing our water to keep their lawns manicured & to fill up their dried up creek beds downtown so more businesses will move there.

The DFW "thing" is to "come on down" we will figure how the .... to provide services, highways, AFTER you get here.
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Old 06-01-2014, 12:20 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,497 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
To get a little pompous, assessments of beauty have a strong subjective element, and I totally get how someone would prefer the smaller hills and bigger trees of parts of East Texas to the hill country, but assessments of beauty also have a normative dimension, and in terms of landscape: greater changes in elevation, more variety in terrain are considered more conventionally/normatively beautiful.

Parts of the hill country do look like northern San Diego county or the hills of southern France or Tuscany without the architecture, or the Blue mountains of New South Wales without the eucalyptus, but the rivers of the Hill country add a whole extra dimension: the Frio, the Pedernales, the Comal, the Guadelupe, the Blanco etc as they flow over limestone create crystal clear waters and weird caverns and canyons and they create a singular kind of beauty. East Texas is pretty but not as pretty as the Appalachian foothills of Georgia or North Carolina or the Ozarks in Arkansas: a lesser version of a type. You can see a better version of the east Texas landscape in any number of places. Where's the better version of the Texas hill country?
Caddo Lake and The Big Thicket are one of a kind. There are no copies of them anywhere else. The Hill Country has some gems but it does look like a poor man's SoCal. Plus I can travel just a few extra hours north and get even BETTER hills and tall trees in Western Arkansas.

The Hill Country is just overrated and reiterates the notion that Texans are notorious for their bad taste.
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:16 PM
 
411 posts, read 631,489 times
Reputation: 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
Caddo Lake and The Big Thicket are one of a kind. There are no copies of them anywhere else. The Hill Country has some gems but it does look like a poor man's SoCal. Plus I can travel just a few extra hours north and get even BETTER hills and tall trees in Western Arkansas.

The Hill Country is just overrated and reiterates the notion that Texans are notorious for their bad taste.
Right. Because tall trees and a lake is something unique to East Texas. East Texas terrain can be found all over the south. It's pretty, but it's hardly "one of a kind."

And you sell the hill country short.
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:08 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,497 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayStokes View Post
Right. Because tall trees and a lake is something unique to East Texas. East Texas terrain can be found all over the south. It's pretty, but it's hardly "one of a kind."

And you sell the hill country short.
Caddo Lake

a. is the largest natural lake in the South
b. is surrounded by the largest cypress forest in the world
c. is home to a prehistoric species of fish as well as ancient trees,

The Big Thicket has been called one of the most biodiverse corners of the globe.

What relevance does the Hill Country have on the world stage? This is a serious question by the way.
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Houston(Screwston),TX
3,573 posts, read 3,380,087 times
Reputation: 4956
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayStokes View Post
Right. Because tall trees and a lake is something unique to East Texas. East Texas terrain can be found all over the south. It's pretty, but it's hardly "one of a kind."

And you sell the hill country short.
I think he was referring to Caddo Lake and Big Thicket which are indeed one of a kind in the state of Texas but I do agree I feel he did sell the hill country short.

Why can't people be a fan of both?
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Old 06-01-2014, 07:08 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,497 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redlionjr View Post
I think he was referring to Caddo Lake and Big Thicket which are indeed one of a kind in the state of Texas but I do agree I feel he did sell the hill country short.

Why can't people be a fan of both?
They can but I am not. I just do not see what is so extraordinary about it. Same goes for the accompanying city of Austin.

I am more impressed by the overall value of a place rather than simply being in awe of how far it deviates from being flat.

I like the Hill Country. I do not love it.
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Old 06-01-2014, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,795 posts, read 2,865,717 times
Reputation: 1238
The Texas hill country is quite actually unique for Texas. It has waterfalls, caves, natural spring water as well as old German towns and much more. Have you checked out Enchanted Rock, or Hamilton Pool?
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Old 06-01-2014, 07:51 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,497 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoninATX View Post
The Texas hill country is quite actually unique for Texas. It has waterfalls, caves, natural spring water as well as old German towns and much more. Have you checked out Enchanted Rock, or Hamilton Pool?
No I have not, sorry. Enchanted Rock looks like a miniature and less attractive version of Stone Mountain. Hamilton Pool seems like it would be worth the trip to see.

The Hill Country is definitely unique for Texas, but when it comes to significance at a national or even global level, I feel that there are portions in East Texas which have it beat.
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