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Old 06-02-2014, 10:52 AM
 
411 posts, read 631,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
Caddo Lake

a. is the largest natural lake in the South
b. is surrounded by the largest cypress forest in the world
c. is home to a prehistoric species of fish as well as ancient trees,

The Big Thicket has been called one of the most biodiverse corners of the globe.

What relevance does the Hill Country have on the world stage? This is a serious question by the way.

That may all very well be true, but the current discussion was about beauty and scenery. Caddo Lake may be the largest natural lake in the south, I'll take your word that it holds that distinction, but I do know there are plenty of larger lakes in the south. There are prettier lakes in the south and elsewhere in the U.S. with better views. And when you go somewhere for beauty or scenery, the fact that it existed before human intervention isn't a factor for me. And the big thicket is mostly flat and forested like so many other areas in the south. Sure, it's pretty, but where are the unique views?

As far as relevance, maybe the ecosystem of Caddo Lake and the Big Thicket is more diverse. I'm sure that appeals to some people. I do know that more people travel to Hill Country for local getaways than East Texas. The general public seems to think it's more attractive. As far as North Texas residents go, overall people seem to go north to East Oklahoma/West Arkansas or south to Hill Country for short trips. I do not know of anyone who travels to East Texas for scenery. So just because you're not impressed with Hill Country, that does not change that many others are.
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Old 06-02-2014, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
13,251 posts, read 9,469,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ETex2 View Post
In fact, I haven't found anywhere in the state that I would consider "ugly".
I don't want to ruffle any feathers, but I'm curious as to what parts (if any) of the USA are "ugly" in your view?

As far as the hill country vs. east Texas controversy, I think both are really pretty. The difference is that east Texas looks like a lot like the rest of the southeast while the hill country is unique. I don't think I've been anywhere in the country that looks exactly like it. Strangely, the only place I know of that looks even remotely like the hill country is the Arbuckles of southern Oklahoma and it is only similar to the hill country.
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Old 06-02-2014, 01:10 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayStokes View Post
That may all very well be true, but the current discussion was about beauty and scenery. Caddo Lake may be the largest natural lake in the south, I'll take your word that it holds that distinction, but I do know there are plenty of larger lakes in the south. There are prettier lakes in the south and elsewhere in the U.S. with better views. And when you go somewhere for beauty or scenery, the fact that it existed before human intervention isn't a factor for me. And the big thicket is mostly flat and forested like so many other areas in the south. Sure, it's pretty, but where are the unique views?

As far as relevance, maybe the ecosystem of Caddo Lake and the Big Thicket is more diverse. I'm sure that appeals to some people. I do know that more people travel to Hill Country for local getaways than East Texas. The general public seems to think it's more attractive. As far as North Texas residents go, overall people seem to go north to East Oklahoma/West Arkansas or south to Hill Country for short trips. I do not know of anyone who travels to East Texas for scenery. So just because you're not impressed with Hill Country, that does not change that many others are.
Well I never said this was an issue of right or wrong. I am stating my opinion just as everyone else is. For me Caddo Lake alone offers a mystic and unconventional beauty that I find to be far more noteworthy than anything in Central Texas. The Hill Country is "nice".

I've never put a great deal of value into the thoughts of the general public.

Also if this is purely about beauty and aesthetics, then explain to me the logic of the arguments claiming East Texas is less pretty simply because the rest of the Southeast is very similar to it. If that's the case then I don't see why I can't claim that East Texas is more beautiful based on the fact that it is more biologically dynamic and historically relevant.

Texans already made the supreme statement of their lack of appreciation for the blessing that is East Texas when they chopped down half of its trees in the past two centuries.
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Old 06-02-2014, 04:45 PM
 
411 posts, read 631,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
Well I never said this was an issue of right or wrong. I am stating my opinion just as everyone else is. For me Caddo Lake alone offers a mystic and unconventional beauty that I find to be far more noteworthy than anything in Central Texas. The Hill Country is "nice".

I've never put a great deal of value into the thoughts of the general public.

Fair enough.


Quote:
Also if this is purely about beauty and aesthetics, then explain to me the logic of the arguments claiming East Texas is less pretty simply because the rest of the Southeast is very similar to it. If that's the case then I don't see why I can't claim that East Texas is more beautiful based on the fact that it is more biologically dynamic and historically relevant.
You can claim that it is more beautiful based on whatever reasons you want. Beauty is subjective to the individual. However, it seems to me more people than not find rolling terrain with hills, mountains, and differing elevations more aesthetically pleasing than flat lands with forests.
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Old 06-02-2014, 05:10 PM
 
Location: The Dirty South.
1,608 posts, read 1,732,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
Caddo Lake and The Big Thicket are one of a kind. There are no copies of them anywhere else. The Hill Country has some gems but it does look like a poor man's SoCal. Plus I can travel just a few extra hours north and get even BETTER hills and tall trees in Western Arkansas.

The Hill Country is just overrated and reiterates the notion that Texans are notorious for their bad taste.
You sound like a central Texas hater.
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Old 06-02-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
574 posts, read 1,114,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
The Big Thicket has been called one of the most biodiverse corners of the globe.

What relevance does the Hill Country have on the world stage? This is a serious question by the way.
Ummm, the Hill Country is widely known as a bio-diverse area. It is an area where the Great Plains, desert southwest, south texas thorn scrub, black land prairie, and coastal plains converge. Last time I checked, I place where several major Eco-regions met would be classified as bio-diverse.
Hotspot of Biodiversity: Unique and Endangered Animals of Central Texas - Environmental Science Institute
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Old 06-02-2014, 06:23 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayStokes View Post
You can claim that it is more beautiful based on whatever reasons you want. Beauty is subjective to the individual. However, it seems to me more people than not find rolling terrain with hills, mountains, and differing elevations more aesthetically pleasing than flat lands with forests.
Except there are no mountains in Central Texas and East Texas isn't flat. The best way to describe both areas is impressive hills with scrubby to sparse vegetation and impressive vegetation with rolling terrain to decent hills, respectively. So yeah, looking at the total package, I'm not seeing the huge edge that the Hill Country is supposed to have.

If anything, as others have said, East Texas hills are mostly hidden by the trees and the area isn't nearly as flat as many here are making it out to be. I also believe that the area receives much less notoriety because it is so isolated from everything. The Hill Country sits adjacent to the state's capital city, so of course it is going to be more popular.
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Old 06-02-2014, 06:25 PM
 
17 posts, read 26,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by die Eichkatze View Post
Ummm, the Hill Country is widely known as a bio-diverse area. It is an area where the Great Plains, desert southwest, south texas thorn scrub, black land prairie, and coastal plains converge. Last time I checked, I place where several major Eco-regions met would be classified as bio-diverse.
Hotspot of Biodiversity: Unique and Endangered Animals of Central Texas - Environmental Science Institute
Where did I say that it didn't have any biodiversity?
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Old 06-02-2014, 07:59 PM
 
2,085 posts, read 1,879,125 times
Reputation: 3441
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
Except there are no mountains in Central Texas and East Texas isn't flat. The best way to describe both areas is impressive hills with scrubby to sparse vegetation and impressive vegetation with rolling terrain to decent hills, respectively. So yeah, looking at the total package, I'm not seeing the huge edge that the Hill Country is supposed to have.

If anything, as others have said, East Texas hills are mostly hidden by the trees and the area isn't nearly as flat as many here are making it out to be. I also believe that the area receives much less notoriety because it is so isolated from everything. The Hill Country sits adjacent to the state's capital city, so of course it is going to be more popular.
I couldnt point this out like I wanted to, because I was at work, but I was wondering how long it was going to take for someone to piece this together...of course the hill country will have more visitors...its primary city practically markets the hill country as one of its main attractions...so obviously more people are going to visit the hill country because its an accompanying aspect of the Austin promotional package.

Thats not to say no one would visit the hill country without Austin, but to make the comparison between visitors to east texas whos largest city is 100,000 and whos largest attraction is the rose garden is just facetious...and would be equally as misleading as me saying that more people live in the southeast than in the hillcountry, so obviously more people must like the landscape of East Texas since it is the region that shares the most topographical similarities with the southeast.. obviously the southeast has more cities for people to live so of course it will draw more people.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
574 posts, read 1,114,671 times
Reputation: 742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surcharles View Post
Where did I say that it didn't have any biodiversity?
You didn't, but you did say: "what makes the Hill Country so special on the world stage" to which I answered: It is the meeting point of several very major Eco-regions. Filled with many rare endangered species only found in the area.

And if you want to be technical about it, the Hill Country is grouped with the Great Plains biosphere reserve. I think the Great Plains is known around the world.

As for East Texas, I much prefer the Athens-Tyler-Jacksonville area that has better hills and some oaks mixed in and you can see more than 3 feet in front of you compared to the Big Thicket area of southeast Texas. I do find the Big Thicket area to be unique, but FOR ME, scenery means being able to see things, and you can't see a damn thing but a curtain of pines in the Big Thicket.
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