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View Poll Results: Can you be a "true" Texan if you were born elsewhere?
Yes! 47 53.41%
No 25 28.41%
Maybe (Explain) 16 18.18%
Voters: 88. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-09-2015, 01:24 PM
 
10,097 posts, read 8,330,084 times
Reputation: 5225

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Quote:
Originally Posted by metroxian View Post
Are you saying as that 'Texas' born and raised that you would deny a status to another who would embrace that Texas attitude although that person wasn't 'born and raised within the borders' of the state?

The OP even states, '... my dad was from Texas and he moved all over the state until he moved to Georgia for work. We always went to visit family during holidays and I would go spend the summer with my aunt and uncle in Texas.'

How is that not as Texan for any person who seeks to claim the identity?

Even Colt McCoy was born in New Mexico but his father carried dirt from Texas to place under his bed. What really does it take to allow a person to embrace the spirit and reality of being from Texas? Before answering, consider the 'native' Texans you'd prefer were from some where else.
.
There are people in Texas who don't like the mold and hate the culture. They move to California and feel as though they've been denied their whole life the CA ethos. Same thing only in reverse for those non-native texans. There are so many Californians I meet here (mostly conservatives) who say Texas is their dream state when they get the chance to move. So of course people get the sense of that Texas spirit and they live it in their own state but until you make the move you can't really grasp what the life is like. Just like the person aching to go to Cali cannot really grasp the full life until they're there. But yes, the spirit is there.
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:55 PM
 
15,724 posts, read 21,284,251 times
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I survived the 2009 summer in San Antonio without A/C in my car (record 60 days over 100F)
That should make me a "Real Texan"
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,691,350 times
Reputation: 4401
Quote:
Originally Posted by metroxian View Post
Are you saying as that 'Texas' born and raised that you would deny a status to another who would embrace that Texas attitude although that person wasn't 'born and raised within the borders' of the state?

The OP even states, '... my dad was from Texas and he moved all over the state until he moved to Georgia for work. We always went to visit family during holidays and I would go spend the summer with my aunt and uncle in Texas.'

How is that not as Texan for any person who seeks to claim the identity?

Even Colt McCoy was born in New Mexico but his father carried dirt from Texas to place under his bed. What really does it take to allow a person to embrace the spirit and reality of being from Texas? Before answering, consider the 'native' Texans you'd prefer were from some where else.
.
But what I said goes for any place in the world. Not just Texas.

Your formative years are crucial to your lifelong identity and outlook on life. Even the food you ate shapes who you are. So if you never got sick from too much Gulf shrimp, Frito pie or steak fingers with frozen Dr Pepper, or you never had to pledge allegiance to the Texas flag every day at school or went on field trips to the Alamo...then there's a major part of the total Texan experience that you have never known.

I understand that many people move here later in life and happily adopt this state as their new home. I definitely call them Texans. They just don't have the total package. This isn't necessarily a bad thing since, as you suggested, there are plenty of born and bred Texans that I would never want to associate with.
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:09 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,747 posts, read 9,557,443 times
Reputation: 3899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Duck View Post
And both President Bushes.
Yeah, don't remind me.

(OK, Poppy wasn't so bad--but he definitely was a Nutmegger, not a Texan.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Your formative years are crucial to your lifelong identity and outlook on life. Even the food you ate shapes who you are. So if you never got sick from too much Gulf shrimp, Frito pie or steak fingers with frozen Dr Pepper, or you never had to pledge allegiance to the Texas flag every day at school or went on field trips to the Alamo...then there's a major part of the total Texan experience that you have never known.

I understand that many people move here later in life and happily adopt this state as their new home. I definitely call them Texans. They just don't have the total package. This isn't necessarily a bad thing since, as you suggested, there are plenty of born and bred Texans that I would never want to associate with.
Bingo. It's where you grew up.

I was born and grew up in Texas. Even if I live in Virginia for 50 years, it would be misleading to say I'm a Virginian.
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:30 PM
 
Location: south Georgia
30 posts, read 35,980 times
Reputation: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Your formative years are crucial to your lifelong identity and outlook on life. Even the food you ate shapes who you are. So if you never got sick from too much Gulf shrimp, Frito pie or steak fingers with frozen Dr Pepper, or you never had to pledge allegiance to the Texas flag every day at school or went on field trips to the Alamo...then there's a major part of the total Texan experience that you have never known.
I grew up with a lot of the Texan aspects of life and I was raised with good ol' Texas values because that is just how my father raised me, and I'm very grateful for that. Before he died 2 years ago, he told me that he hoped I would move to Texas because he said he knew that was where I belonged. A lot of my childhood was spent in TX. As I said, I would spend the summers with my aunt and uncle, and while there, we would travel the state a lot on little mini vacations. Now that I'm here, I feel like I can start my life

Last edited by MCB79; 06-09-2015 at 04:14 PM..
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Old 06-09-2015, 04:40 PM
 
105 posts, read 87,720 times
Reputation: 95
I honestly can't wait to move here for School. I was born in Florida, lived there for 23 Years.
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Old 06-09-2015, 04:47 PM
 
8,276 posts, read 6,782,714 times
Reputation: 12081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
Guess who wasn't born in Texas:

Sam Houston (first president of the Republic of Texas and US senator)
Stephen F. Austin ("Father of Texas" and namesake of the capital)
David Crockett (hero of the Alamo and US representative)
Roger Staubach (Super Bowl-winning Dallas Cowboy quarterback)
Randy White (Super Bowl-winning Cowboy linebacker, late '70s)
Troy Aikman (Super-Bowl-winning Cowboy QB, early-mid '90s)
Jerry Jeff Walker (country singer heavily associated with Texas but really from NY state)
Mike Judge (creator of the greatest and most accurate Texas-based TV show of all time, King of the Hill. And Office Space.)
Thread should have ended there. The founding fathers of TX were transplants.
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Old 06-09-2015, 04:53 PM
 
10,097 posts, read 8,330,084 times
Reputation: 5225
Among native and raised Texans there's a shared experience. When the poster brought up Frito pies and the Texas pledge, it was nostalgic! Lol.

Kolaches, tex mex, blue bell ice cream. State and county fairs. Rodeos. High school football. Mums for homecoming.

I never even thought about this stuff until after I left Texas.
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Old 06-09-2015, 04:59 PM
 
8,276 posts, read 6,782,714 times
Reputation: 12081
Quote:
Originally Posted by radiolibre99 View Post
Among native and raised Texans there's a shared experience. When the poster brought up Frito pies and the Texas pledge, it was nostalgic! Lol.

Kolaches, tex mex, blue bell ice cream. State and county fairs. Rodeos. High school football. Mums for homecoming.

I never even thought about this stuff until after I left Texas.
I've lived around the country and kolaches were the only thing in your list that I hadn't been exposed to in several other states.
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Old 06-09-2015, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Warrior Country
4,577 posts, read 5,830,170 times
Reputation: 3964
Quote:
Originally Posted by War Beagle View Post
I've lived around the country and kolaches were the only thing in your list that I hadn't been exposed to in several other states.
Yeah, but their frito pies probably had beans......& it was a miniature version of real High School Football (& probably a miniature version of a Mum.

hound <---- feels like making a frito pie & washing it down with a DP tonite.
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