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Old 05-19-2020, 12:56 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,843,844 times
Reputation: 4036

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Person in Charge View Post
I'd say if you live east of the Hill Country, there aren't that many outdoor activities. I live in Houston and we have the beach and some nearby state parks with hiking trails, but we sure don't have mountains.

Also, it's as hot as heck in summertime.

If you want mountains, you'll have to go to the Big Bend area or the Guadalupe and Davis mountains in west Texas.

Personally, if I were you, I'd stay in the Pacific Northwest or move to a town near the Rockies or maybe the Appalachians.
East of the hill country is the only part of the state with National Forests. (well north texas has the LBJ Grasslands)

In my opinion the best spots in the state for outdoors stuff are East Texas and Far West Texas/ Big bend.

The Hill Country is pretty, but the deal with that is there isn't any real wilderness in most of the middle part of the state...you are always pretty close to someone's private residence. That and the state parks/ natural areas are always pretty full.

I hit up GMNP right before quarantine shut everything down, and that area is awesome. But even there you still get a ton of light pollution from the oil fields so even though once you get into the park you are pretty much in the wilderness, you still have that annoying glow from the east.

BBNP has very little light pollution.

Now if you idea of being out in nature is in a lake house on a lake with tons of other lake houses, Texas/ the Hill Country might be perfect. The whole hill country is pretty built up. It's rural, not wilderness and all of the lakes are artificial.

The problem is Lake Houses are expensive and in a fixed spot, so unless you have family land or are wealthy you are going to have to Air B&B that sort of thing...It isn't like out west where for the price of Gas and a maybe a small fee you can go to hundreds or thousands of lakes that are surrounded by public land. To enjoy without big crowds.

That isn't the case in Texas. Texas has very little actual wilderness/ places hardly touched by man.
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Old 05-19-2020, 01:03 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,843,844 times
Reputation: 4036
Quote:
Originally Posted by riffle View Post
Here's a question for you: why is Denver the largest city in Colorado? From an outdoor recreation perspective, it's not the best location. The highways into the mountains are congested, and east of the Front Range is flat. Estes Park and Telluride are more scenic, so why doesn't everyone move there from Denver?

If you can answer that question, you'll understand why people live in Texas.
The reason is obviously historical and has alot to do with rail.

Major cities are not built for the intention of just being an outdoors destination...resort towns are, but not cities. Some happen to be...(Seattle) but that is because of economics.

That said Denver having way better access to the outdoors than anywhere in Texas and that is a huge reason why so many people want to live there.

Not the reason for the city existing in the first place, no, but a huge part of what makes it an attractive place to live now. The lifestyle factor is a driver for Denver's growth and continued success.
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Old 05-19-2020, 01:09 PM
 
7,648 posts, read 3,605,936 times
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It all depends on what kind of "outdoor enthusiasm" you like to pursue.

Backcountry backpacking in the mountains; skiing; whitewater kayaking? Not so much.

But if you like to run, cycle, fish, hunt, boat, ride horses; lots and lots of opportunity.

I think this thread basically just turned into another round of bashing Texas because things are different here than in the earthly paradises of the PNW, California, and Colorado, where all the men are handsome, all the women are strong, all the children are above average, it's always sunny and 72 except during ski season where there's always just the exact amount of powder on a perfect base, and all mankind lives in perfect harmony.
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Old 05-25-2020, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Addison, TX
55 posts, read 25,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
The reason is obviously historical and has alot to do with rail.

Major cities are not built for the intention of just being an outdoors destination...resort towns are, but not cities. Some happen to be...(Seattle) but that is because of economics.

That said Denver having way better access to the outdoors than anywhere in Texas and that is a huge reason why so many people want to live there.

Not the reason for the city existing in the first place, no, but a huge part of what makes it an attractive place to live now. The lifestyle factor is a driver for Denver's growth and continued success.
And urban growth boundaries, which DFW and Houston don't seem to have, and Denver has...
There is a different mentality towards urban planning and transportation in Denver, it's generally more sustainable, bike, and ped friendly - in addition to nature being closer.

There are a number of cities in the US I've lived in that have better outdoor opportunities than any Texas city, and it's not Denver or Seattle. DC and Baltimore in particular, there are lots of great parks and nice beaches within 2 or 3 hours drive. People here like to go to "Lakes" - which to someone from anywhere with actual lakes (Michigan) are not real lakes, they're reservoirs. They don't even let us swim in reservoirs on the east coast, that's a drinking water supply. I make fun of the people in Dallas that own boats. What natural body of water are you going to take a boat to?

I'm not particularly outdoorsy, but I have to agree with the criticism of Texas as not being that interesting from an outdoors perspective. It's way too hot in the summer to even bother doing anything outside. Even the desert is not as interesting as Arizona or Utah or some of the other states out West.
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Old 05-25-2020, 08:36 PM
 
5,226 posts, read 2,905,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
That said Denver having way better access to the outdoors than anywhere in Texas and that is a huge reason why so many people want to live there.

Not the reason for the city existing in the first place, no, but a huge part of what makes it an attractive place to live now. The lifestyle factor is a driver for Denver's growth and continued success.
To me, Denver is overhyped in terms of outdoor access. Try making the trip west on I-70 on a Saturday morning in winter to go to the mountain resorts. The traffic is unreal. You've got to leave at 5 am or so to beat the traffic out of Denver.

Also, Denver isn't close to the mountain towns. The closest ski areas in Summit County (Breckenridge, Arapaho Basin, and Keystone) are about 1.5 hours away driving if traffic is reasonable. I-70 west is a pleasant and scenic but time consuming. Copper Mountain, Vail, and Beaver Creek are about 2 hours away. Aspen is even further.

Far West Texas has some good mountainous terrain for hiking, but it isn't close to a lot of employment centers. The 6 hour Guadalupe Mountain hike isn't even that close to El Paso.

Now that El Paso has entered the conversation, there is some outdoor recreation in the form of hiking in the nearby Franklin Mountains. Midland-Odessa to the Davis Mountains is feasible but not regularly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
It all depends on what kind of "outdoor enthusiasm" you like to pursue.
I haven't been lacking for outdoor options during my time in Texas. I like to play tennis. I live in Dallas. It's not difficult to play tennis while living in Dallas. Cycling is an option here. I've played in sand volleyball leagues. Those 3 interests are fairly general and can be done in a lot of cities.

I have gone on trips to hike in the Rocky Mountains and Arizona since living here. Hiking isn't a big passion, so I don't need constant access to it. When I have the opportunity to hike, I will hike.
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Old 05-26-2020, 09:25 AM
 
7,648 posts, read 3,605,936 times
Reputation: 21780
You know, as a Texan I could say some of the same things about western Colorado.


"There's no good largemouth bass fishing." "Can't run my speed boat." "Where can you water ski?" "can't go for an easy bike ride, everything's mountainous and little narrow tiny roads."


There are probably other things too.


It strikes me as the height of arrogance to move somewhere whose geographical characteristics are extremely well known and then complain about the geography that is apparent to anyone who will take the time to look at a map.


"Oh My God - there aren't any big mountains in Texas!" "Oh my god, most of the state is a flat or gently rolling plain!" Oh my god, there aren't glacially-formed natural mountain lakes!" "Oh my god, it's hot in Texas!" "Oh my god, we have to drive to Colorado or Utah to ski!"


Are these reallly such a big surprise to you?
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