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Old 03-14-2018, 05:48 AM
 
566 posts, read 458,795 times
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Best you stay there then......
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Old 03-14-2018, 07:58 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,849,944 times
Reputation: 4036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpointer View Post
How could you say that $85 is a great bargain? In Washington, the state where I now live, you can get a Discover Pass for $30 which can be used on two vehicles and covers access to over 100 state parks and other state lands for a full year. Washington has more state parks than Texas, which is a considerably larger state in area, and access to the parks in Washington is far less expensive than access to state parks in Texas.

It appears to me that Washington manages its public lands far better than Texas does with its lands.
Idaho offers a winter back country Pass for like $25 which includes like 150 miles of GROOMED trails, (in addition to ungroomed) for snow shoeing, cross country and skate skiing. now that is a bargain.

Washington also has well managed public land.

This isn't a political partisan thing either, people in the West regardless of their political affiliation, value public land. It's something my old man (a Reagan Conservative) and our neighbor who was pretty lefty, both agreed on. There is definitely some disagreement on the details of how much land should be used for foresting or livestock and how much should be preserved, but both sides tend to favor local control over the public lands.
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Old 03-14-2018, 08:25 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,849,944 times
Reputation: 4036
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Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Funny to see people whine about summer heat. First off, you've got mornings and evenings, as well as the other 6-9 months of the year when conditions are cooler. Second, there are plenty of suitable outdoor activities designed for summer's heat (water-based recreation) as well as appropriate ways to dress for them.

People who bring up heat as an excuse are just closeted couch potatoes.
Dude, Last summer (a mild summer at that) I got out of the pool at 11pm and it was still 95 degrees here in North Texas. I actually briefly felt a chill (before returning to sweating) because of how warm the water I had been in was. That is too hot.

I'm not a couch potato at all either, I'm headed to the Forest this weekend and the weather is going to be awesome. I do second think camping for about 3-4 months per year due to heat, because who honestly wants to sleep in 90 degree weather with humidity and bugs? I mean I still go, because camping is fun, but that kind of weather is brutal and much worse than late fall camping up north when it drops below freezing, for that you just get a warm bag.

Just because I have a realistic perspective on the outdoors opportunities in Texas doesn't mean I don't love the great State of Texas or that I don't take advantage of what we do have here.
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Old 03-14-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,849,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abelinkkin View Post
While there is some very nice scenery, it is nothing compared to states like Utah, Colorado, and the Pacific NW.

Texas has done a deplorable job of managing its funding for public nature areas. State Parks are severely underfunded and understaffed. Many lack basic amenities like clean bathrooms. They are very restricted on what you can do and where you can camp. Generally you can only camp in designated areas and no fires are allowed most of the year. Also forget about any kind of off road vehicle. They are banned on pretty much all public land.

If you desire a wide choice and freedom to enjoy natural areas I would avoid this state.
Yeah you can camp pretty much anywhere in the National Forests (Except for Deer season) here which is cool, but State parks are way overly restrictive such as frequent fire bans, "Family friendly" no alcohol rules and restrictive camping sites.

Whats the point if I can't camp in the actual woods and have a camp fire and enjoy a brew with my buddies while not sitting next to someone else's RV? It isn't like were are going to get trashed and burn the woods down lol.
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Old 03-14-2018, 10:14 AM
 
Location: USA
757 posts, read 193,058 times
Reputation: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpointer View Post
How could you say that $85 is a great bargain? In Washington, the state where I now live, you can get a Discover Pass for $30 which can be used on two vehicles and covers access to over 100 state parks and other state lands for a full year. Washington has more state parks than Texas, which is a considerably larger state in area, and access to the parks in Washington is far less expensive than access to state parks in Texas.

It appears to me that Washington manages its public lands far better than Texas does with its lands.

well, sounds like you're not really a 'outdoor enthusiast', you're really a 'Park Hiker'...

You won't like Texas; we have a Real Outdoors here; rattlesnakes. moccasins & mosquitos; cactus, burs, and fire-ants; and every kinda bug and reptile imaginable and un-imaginable; deserts ,forest thickets & barren beaches & guys (and gals) in them shooting deer/animals and EATING them; guys (and gals) hooking FISH and eating them - even shooting guns at inanimate objects just for the sake of shooting!! People even SWEATing here (google that word if you're not familiar with it). And can you believe the only skiing they have is on UnFrozen Water?? Oh the Calamity!! Best you stay put, you won't like it here.
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Old 03-14-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,533,644 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Dude, Last summer (a mild summer at that) I got out of the pool at 11pm and it was still 95 degrees here in North Texas. I actually briefly felt a chill (before returning to sweating) because of how warm the water I had been in was. That is too hot.

I'm not a couch potato at all either, I'm headed to the Forest this weekend and the weather is going to be awesome. I do second think camping for about 3-4 months per year due to heat, because who honestly wants to sleep in 90 degree weather with humidity and bugs? I mean I still go, because camping is fun, but that kind of weather is brutal and much worse than late fall camping up north when it drops below freezing, for that you just get a warm bag.

Just because I have a realistic perspective on the outdoors opportunities in Texas doesn't mean I don't love the great State of Texas or that I don't take advantage of what we do have here.
And if you want to strengthen that perspective, start by realizing that 95 degree nights in North Texas (if they even happened) are the exception, not the norm.
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Old 03-14-2018, 01:58 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA>Tijuana, BC>San Antonio, TX
4,630 posts, read 4,706,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpointer View Post
Therefore, would moving to Texas be good for outdoor enthusiasts, or are outdoor enthusiasts restricted by what they can do because so much of the land is off-limits?
Generally speaking, my opinion is that Texas is less of an "REI" outdoorsy state and more of a "Bass Pro Shop" outdoorsy type state.
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Old 03-14-2018, 03:10 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 1,447,832 times
Reputation: 2390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
And if you want to strengthen that perspective, start by realizing that 95 degree nights in North Texas (if they even happened) are the exception, not the norm.
90 degrees at midnight is pretty normal for North Texas in the summer. We don't reach lows of upper 70s until like 3 AM lol.
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Old 03-14-2018, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Renton, WA
602 posts, read 1,198,342 times
Reputation: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpointer View Post
Therefore, would moving to Texas be good for outdoor enthusiasts, or are outdoor enthusiasts restricted by what they can do because so much of the land is off-limits?
Quote:
Originally Posted by malcorub16 View Post
Generally speaking, my opinion is that Texas is less of an "REI" outdoorsy state and more of a "Bass Pro Shop" outdoorsy type state.
What would be the difference between an "REI" outdoorsy state and a "Bass Pro Shop" outdoorsy type state, other than the fact the Bass Pro Shop enthusiasts are more likely to fish than REI enthusiasts, since REI doesn't sell fishing equipment.
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Old 03-15-2018, 12:12 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,533,644 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
90 degrees at midnight is pretty normal for North Texas in the summer. We don't reach lows of upper 70s until like 3 AM lol.
If the low temp ends up in the 70s, then there's no way temps would be at 90F by midnight: much too short of a window to drop that much, especially during summer's heat and humidity. Sure, mid/upper 80s, but not 90F.

Plus, the readings at those weather stations, often at airports and other heavily built environments, will skew warmer thanks to the effects of UHI.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpointer View Post
What would be the difference between an "REI" outdoorsy state and a "Bass Pro Shop" outdoorsy type state, other than the fact the Bass Pro Shop enthusiasts are more likely to fish than REI enthusiasts, since REI doesn't sell fishing equipment.
Oh, I don't know, the type of outdoor-recreation that is done?
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