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Old 03-15-2018, 07:38 AM
 
7,817 posts, read 3,694,602 times
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You know, a moment's perusal of a map would tell you that there is not going to be much mountain hiking in Texas. You can easily find out that it is hot in the summer here, too.

If your idea of outdoor recreation is backpacking in the mountains, getting water from cold mountain streams and putting your food in the lingering snowbanks to keep it cold, you're pretty much out of luck in the state of Texas, although the Chisos Mountains offer some excellent backpacking - but it's a long long drive from almost anywhere. Some good backpacking in eastern Oklahoma, as well. But it's not going to compare with the Rocky Mountains. As a map would tell you.

On the other hand, if your idea of outdoor activity can extend to hunting, fishing, bicycling, car-camping, riding an inner tube down the Guadalupe, kayaking, visiting the beach, birdwatching in one of the many wildlife refuges (and don't forget Matagorda Island), water skiing, sailing, and horseback riding, you can certainly find things to do in Texas.

Anyway, I have a suspicion that the whole thread is another one of those bogus threads where someone asks a disingenuous question ("what's more popular in Texas, alpine or cross-country skiing? How's the ice fishing?") and uses the differences between Texas and their current place of residence as a jumping-off point to slam Texas for not having as much of whatever it is as their current place. The majority of these questions could be answered by a moment's research. I mean, just now there's another thread asking whether there are trees in Dallas. Nope, not a one. Those things that line both sides of Tokalon Drive or Gaston Ave.? Not trees, those are just incredibly lifelike replicas.
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Old 03-15-2018, 09:34 AM
 
2,062 posts, read 1,454,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
If the low temp ends up in the 70s, then there's no way temps would be at 90F by midnight: much too short of a window to drop that much, especially during summer's heat and humidity. Sure, mid/upper 80s, but not 90F.

Plus, the readings at those weather stations, often at airports and other heavily built environments, will skew warmer thanks to the effects of UHI.
A typical July day can have a high of 98 and a low of 81 (or 79) and still be 90 around midnight. Not 95, but 88-91 is pretty typical. You're right that the urban heat island effect plays a role, so it's probably a little bit below 90 outside of the city. Another thing is that unlike in Houston, Dallas tends to become relatively drier as the day goes on.
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Old 03-15-2018, 03:02 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,542,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Another thing is that unlike in Houston, Dallas tends to become relatively drier as the day goes on.
Dallas tends to have higher pressures during summer, where dry air aloft can mix down to the surface, and drop dewpoints a bit. Though in general, all cities see a decrease in relative humidity from morning to afternoon, because it is inversely related to temperature.
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Old 03-15-2018, 10:24 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,862,886 times
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Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
And if you want to strengthen that perspective, start by realizing that 95 degree nights in North Texas (if they even happened) are the exception, not the norm.
I've lived here 8 years, and spend 6 summers here (minus the ones I spent in Alaska and Italy)

Of Course 95 degrees at 11 AM isn't the norm but it isn't that far off from the norm. Summers are hot and sticky and Sleeping outside isn't comfortable in the summer for the most part.
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Old 03-15-2018, 10:37 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,862,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCyou View Post
well, sounds like you're not really a 'outdoor enthusiast', you're really a 'Park Hiker'...

You won't like Texas; we have a Real Outdoors here; rattlesnakes. moccasins & mosquitos; cactus, burs, and fire-ants; and every kinda bug and reptile imaginable and un-imaginable; deserts ,forest thickets & barren beaches & guys (and gals) in them shooting deer/animals and EATING them; guys (and gals) hooking FISH and eating them - even shooting guns at inanimate objects just for the sake of shooting!! People even SWEATing here (google that word if you're not familiar with it). And can you believe the only skiing they have is on UnFrozen Water?? Oh the Calamity!! Best you stay put, you won't like it here.
People do all almost all of those things in all the western states, (beaches excepted from the landlocked states) except in other western states you don't have to buy a dear lease (stupidest thing I have ever heard of) and there is enough public land that you can hike, fish, and hunt on that without needing permission from a land owner.
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Old 03-15-2018, 10:48 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,862,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
You know, a moment's perusal of a map would tell you that there is not going to be much mountain hiking in Texas. You can easily find out that it is hot in the summer here, too.

If your idea of outdoor recreation is backpacking in the mountains, getting water from cold mountain streams and putting your food in the lingering snowbanks to keep it cold, you're pretty much out of luck in the state of Texas, although the Chisos Mountains offer some excellent backpacking - but it's a long long drive from almost anywhere. Some good backpacking in eastern Oklahoma, as well. But it's not going to compare with the Rocky Mountains. As a map would tell you.

On the other hand, if your idea of outdoor activity can extend to hunting, fishing, bicycling, car-camping, riding an inner tube down the Guadalupe, kayaking, visiting the beach, birdwatching in one of the many wildlife refuges (and don't forget Matagorda Island), water skiing, sailing, and horseback riding, you can certainly find things to do in Texas.

Anyway, I have a suspicion that the whole thread is another one of those bogus threads where someone asks a disingenuous question ("what's more popular in Texas, alpine or cross-country skiing? How's the ice fishing?") and uses the differences between Texas and their current place of residence as a jumping-off point to slam Texas for not having as much of whatever it is as their current place. The majority of these questions could be answered by a moment's research. I mean, just now there's another thread asking whether there are trees in Dallas. Nope, not a one. Those things that line both sides of Tokalon Drive or Gaston Ave.? Not trees, those are just incredibly lifelike replicas.
I'm not going to blame Texas for not being the Rockies, because it isn't, but its totally fair game to say that the state has done a terrible job of putting aside public land and has small, underwhelming state parks with lots of restrictions.

I think it's unfair to say that anyone who criticizes the outdoors situation doesn't enjoy the outdoors either, I've camped, fished,and canoed my whole life, including my time here.

It isn't the only state that is bad at this sort of thing BTW.
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Old 03-15-2018, 11:33 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,542,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Of Course 95 degrees at 11 AM isn't the norm.
Good, glad you agree.
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Old 03-16-2018, 05:55 AM
 
1,052 posts, read 1,372,249 times
Reputation: 1321
I would say TX is not great for outdoor enthusiasts, but it can be decent if you put some effort into it. That's the main issue for me: compared to other states or even foreign countries I've lived in or visited, TX requires quite a lot more effort to access the outdoors and once you do arrive, there very well may be some garbage there or some yo-yo in an obnoxious RV or Motorboat being inconsiderate.

Nature in TX was rough, mean, and a little homely to begin with. Then you add to that the way its human inhabitants have treated her, she's in even rougher shape.
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Old 03-16-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Austin
1,062 posts, read 540,501 times
Reputation: 1405
No absolutely not. Austin is generally considered the best for outdoors activities but it's awful compared to the western or eastern states. The places to hike are either way outside of town, very flat and small, or full of homeless encampments. There are of course no beaches, only dirty lakes. Look at a map of public land. Texas has less than any other state
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Old 03-16-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,317 posts, read 3,750,187 times
Reputation: 4611
Yes and no. It depends on the activities.

If you like to ride bikes, go shooting, and explore the wilderness, Texas is fine. But if you enjoy mountain climbing and skiing, Texas will leave you disappointed.
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