U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-03-2019, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Murphy, TX
654 posts, read 2,760,690 times
Reputation: 447

Advertisements

People in Texas has been discussing Property Tax control since I moved to Texas in 2007. But over that time the amount paid in Taxes has only gone up even after I down sized 7 years go to a smaller house.

As property rates increase the local government (cities, schools, etc) can happily use up the bigger budget. They don't need any voter approval to do so.

In fact, according to this Forbes article Texas local gov increase revenue by 53%, which was more than in CA.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckde.../#6423b57d201b

Texas State Legislature hasn't passed anything drastic and honestly I don't see too many Texas calling out local Government to keep their budgets in check. Honestly, in Texas I am not seeing the fiscal Conservatives at all but they will be up in arms social/religious conservative issue.

For me the only guaranteed escape is to move out to middle of nowhere or maybe Texaranka, AR (special benefits).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2019, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Austin
1,062 posts, read 535,098 times
Reputation: 1404
Because the state government also gets increased revenue which they use for programs they like, but not for pay raises for workers, who haven't gotten a raise since a small one in 2014
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2019, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,501 posts, read 30,038,368 times
Reputation: 7140
You are totally missing the details, I assume.
- Property tax rates have been decreasing in most places over time (i.e. Austin);
- Property values have continued to rise, but are at least partially off-set by the lowered rates;
- Robin Hood redistribution has gone 'off the rails' and has resulted in the state 'shedding' its portion of the public school burden onto local property taxes (state used to pay ~50%, now down to well under 35%, last I looked?);
- Your 53% is really 15% when corrected for inflation and population growth;
- In addition, that inflation rate that was used was national rate. Texas appears to have a notably higher local rate of inflation, although exact numbers are hard to get. That would lower the 15% to something lower.
- Population growth is expensive - new roads, new infrastructure, etc - and the booming population results in higher costs per capita.

Anyway, not saying spending isn't going up, but those are just unsupported conclusions based on sketchy data.

Last edited by Trainwreck20; 07-08-2019 at 12:22 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2019, 11:48 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
3,598 posts, read 1,844,852 times
Reputation: 4036
Quote:
Originally Posted by unseengundam View Post
People in Texas has been discussing Property Tax control since I moved to Texas in 2007. But over that time the amount paid in Taxes has only gone up even after I down sized 7 years go to a smaller house.

As property rates increase the local government (cities, schools, etc) can happily use up the bigger budget. They don't need any voter approval to do so.

In fact, according to this Forbes article Texas local gov increase revenue by 53%, which was more than in CA.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckde.../#6423b57d201b

Texas State Legislature hasn't passed anything drastic and honestly I don't see too many Texas calling out local Government to keep their budgets in check. Honestly, in Texas I am not seeing the fiscal Conservatives at all but they will be up in arms social/religious conservative issue.

For me the only guaranteed escape is to move out to middle of nowhere or maybe Texaranka, AR (special benefits).
Texans have had high property Taxes for 150 years. It's historically been one of the biggest drivers of revenue for the state and made up the vast majority of state revenue before oil was discovered. As a result, people have been discussing property tax control as long as the state has existed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2019, 04:12 PM
 
549 posts, read 353,656 times
Reputation: 1110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainwreck20 View Post
You are totally missing the details, I assume.
- Property tax rates have been decreasing in most places over time (i.e. Austin);
- Property values have continued to rise, but are at least partially off-set by the lowered rates;
- Robin Hood redistribution has gone 'off the rails' and has resulted in the state 'shedding' its portion of the public school burden onto local property taxes (state used to pay ~50%, now down to well under 35%, last I looked?);
- Your 53% is really 15% when corrected for inflation and population growth;
- In addition, that inflation rate that was used was national rate. Texas appears to have a notably higher local rate of inflation, although exact numbers are hard to get. That would lower the 15% to something lower.
- Population growth is expensive - new roads, new infrastructure, etc - and the booming population results in higher costs per capita.

Anyway, not saying spending isn't going up, but those are just unsupported conclusions based on sketchy data.
Also population is not equal to cost of government. Texas cities are sprawled which means you need more roads, -schools, fire stations, and police to serve the same number of people compared to a dense area. In other places state transfers funded through income tax would help with this but here they don't.

Last everywhere else indigent medical care is state funded in most of Texas its funded by counties. Healthcare inflation vastly exceeds regular inflation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2019, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,295 posts, read 2,197,714 times
Reputation: 1464
A big draw for many families to want to relocate to Texas is all the well-funded ISDs...guess what? That costs money, and the lion's share of your property taxes go to one ISD or another.

Go next door to Louisiana where you pay a fraction of the property tax and your kids have class in trailers with a good chance of being taught by an uncertified teacher. Did I mention that you'll have to pay 4-6% state income tax, and close to 10% sales tax?

I'll take the Texas approach.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
52,730 posts, read 41,520,106 times
Reputation: 73620
I love me some Texas but here in the Tyler metro area (outside the Tyler city limits), property taxes are spiraling so out of control that it's making me reconsider retiring here. I mean, if we can get lower property tax rates but pay little or nothing in retirement income tax wise, we will strongly consider moving out of state, which will make us sort of sad but dang - it's getting ridiculous.

And meanwhile in our metro area, new schools are being built left and right and they are GORGEOUS and clearly very expensive. For instance, here is the newest junior high school in our area:
Tyler ISD

It's opulent, as are the other schools in this area. And both our local high schools are being rebuilt as well. Not saying that's not necessary but all at once? And funded more and more by local taxes and less and less by the state. $198 MILLION dollar bond! Lord have mercy.
https://tylerpaper.com/news/local/ty...2fc87a393.html

Oh and Moore Middle School is getting a renovation too:
2016


We have been house shopping and we have already ruled out Bullard and Whitehouse due to their incredibly high property taxes. We looked at a home in Bullard recently, priced at $369,000. I have no idea what the current owners paid for it or what the appraised value is, but the PROPERTY TAXES ALONE are currently over $9000 a year. Loved the house, but no thanks. We passed. I want some relief. As it is right now, our property taxes in Chandler, in a home that is appraised at around $260,000, are nearly $6000 a year, and our tax rate, though higher than Tyler's, is lower than Bullard's.

When we bought this house five years ago, the taxes were a little over $3000 a year. They have nearly doubled in five years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
16,772 posts, read 10,054,694 times
Reputation: 23440
Interesting stuff.
We left Texas in 1999. Don't remember property taxes being all that high, but we left for business reasons having nothing to do with cost of living.
We're retired. Mississippi. Town of about 35,000.
Because of tax advantages of being over 65 and homestead, we live in a very nice 2000 s/ft 3-2-2, in the city limits, and pay $1000 a year in property tax.
Our home is paid for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,501 posts, read 30,038,368 times
Reputation: 7140
Eh, once you hit retirement age, the exemptions are huge. My mom lives in a $300k house and pays right at $2,000 a year in taxes, with 2/3rds of that 'frozen' (school portion). Make sure you do the math very precisely before you decide what the costs will be. That frozen portion is huge - a great hedge against inflation - and all the other states that I have looked at do not have any 'freeze' or near the exemptions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
52,730 posts, read 41,520,106 times
Reputation: 73620
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainwreck20 View Post
Eh, once you hit retirement age, the exemptions are huge. My mom lives in a $300k house and pays right at $2,000 a year in taxes, with 2/3rds of that 'frozen' (school portion). Make sure you do the math very precisely before you decide what the costs will be. That frozen portion is huge - a great hedge against inflation - and all the other states that I have looked at do not have any 'freeze' or near the exemptions.
Well, we are about four or five years away from retirement, and the exemptions are not "huge." I am grateful for them, but it won't make a significant difference in our overall property taxes. Maybe over time, but they won't go down, that's for sure, and they will be based on the appraised value of a homestead in the future when we qualify for the exemption.

How long ago did your mom qualify for that freeze?

https://comptroller.texas.gov/taxes/...sabled-faq.php

Believe me, we are doing all the retirement math very precisely. We have a nice amount of retirement money but we're not multimillionaires and we want to maximize our money and income. Property taxes and taxes overall are a huge consideration.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top