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Old 05-19-2020, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
1,099 posts, read 633,814 times
Reputation: 3236

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We live on a hillside above a lake in the Hill Country. Because we're sitting on top of limestone, when it rains, the water drains into the limestone within hours. We do not leave anything laying about to catch water for mosquitoes to breed in. Because we're on a hillside, we get a nice breeze most of the time. As a result of all these, we rarely have any mosquitoes at all. When we do get them, they are of the stealth variety previously described. Nasty little buggers whose welts last several days.

But mosquitoes aren't the big bug issue for us. Twice a year, we spray around every opening into our house, including pipes and electrical lines, so the following do not join us inside:

Scorpions
Giant red-headed centipedes
Spiders of many varieties
Crickets

If they stay out in the meadow, fine.

We also stalk and destroy every yellow jacket nest we find on the property, as Mom is allergic, and do the same for fire ants.

Frankly, we have a lot fewer bugs on this acreage than we did in/around our suburban house in Virginia, when we were stationed there.
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Old 05-19-2020, 09:38 AM
 
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Bugs are ginormous, like the size of bowling balls. As you're entering your house, you'll have to make a run for it and hope they don't tear your door down.
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Old 05-19-2020, 10:16 AM
 
12,464 posts, read 7,345,532 times
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How are the bugs? Big enough to carry you away or snatch small children and pets out of your arms.
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Old 05-19-2020, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,979 posts, read 11,110,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkingOfTexas View Post
Thanks. Leaning toward DFW but also considering the San Antonio and Houston areas.
We lived in DFW for a little more than a decade, and even with quarterly pest control we regularly had to deal with ants and spiders getting into the house. We also had to replace part of our privacy fence due to termites and lost two plum trees to plum borer moths.

Wasps were a yearly nuisance, and at one point they got into the house because they'd built a large nest in the chimney.

Carpenter bees built nests in our fence, and cicada killer wasps were common in our flower beds. Those are solitary, though, and will only sting if you handle them roughly.

The mosquitoes were pretty bad where we lived, but we didn't care for the terrible summertime climate so unless we were at the neighborhood pool we spent as little time as possible outdoors between mid-June and early September.

FWIW, I haven't spent a penny on professional pest control since we moved back to Colorado.
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Old 05-19-2020, 01:32 PM
 
4,236 posts, read 4,466,993 times
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Quote:
Should we introduce the Texas Centipede to the discussion?
I saw so many Texas Centipedes that were nearly a foot long - and the clicking of the walk on wood and rocks and metal (sides of a trailer house) is unnerving. I really hate those things.


Scorpions stung me in my sleeping bag probably a half dozen times when I was a kid, in house and camping - various places in the Hill Country. It doesn't really hurt that much, but it sucks to be woken up but some jerk stinging you on the foot when you are sleeping.
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Old 05-19-2020, 01:35 PM
 
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Thanks all, I appreciate the (serious) responses. Yes, I know there are other things to consider. I will open other threads for those discussions.
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Old 05-19-2020, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,500 posts, read 30,034,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
I saw so many Texas Centipedes that were nearly a foot long - and the clicking of the walk on wood and rocks and metal (sides of a trailer house) is unnerving. I really hate those things.


Scorpions stung me in my sleeping bag probably a half dozen times when I was a kid, in house and camping - various places in the Hill Country. It doesn't really hurt that much, but it sucks to be woken up but some jerk stinging you on the foot when you are sleeping.
I have no phobias of bugs. I grew up catching snakes for pets. I have been stung by scorpions probably near a dozen times. But those damned centipedes give me the heebie jeebies. The first one I saw was on the ceiling inside our house in Georgetown in the 70s and it was over a foot long. Straight out of Dungeons and Dragons .
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Old 05-19-2020, 03:07 PM
 
Location: League City
3,601 posts, read 6,990,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan20 View Post
Should we introduce the Texas Centipede to the discussion?
That is the only thing that would hold me back from living in the Hill Country. I still catch lizards and spiders and snakes. Heck I let milder wasps and spiders stay around my house for pest control. Recently I had a leopard frog in my hands until he decided to leap at the last second. That same day I acquired about 20 fire ant stings and a number of other insect bites. None of that phases me. But centipedes are different. Centipedes give me nightmares.
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Old 05-19-2020, 03:25 PM
 
548 posts, read 353,442 times
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In all seriousness when the mosquitoes get to be about hummingbird sized they are really easy to pick off with a 410. They just naturally don't have much agility in their flight dynamics especially as they grow larger. Kitten sized ones you just hit with a bat because they are so slow.
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Old 05-19-2020, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,500 posts, read 30,034,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackalope48 View Post
In all seriousness when the mosquitoes get to be about hummingbird sized they are really easy to pick off with a 410. They just naturally don't have much agility in their flight dynamics especially as they grow larger. Kitten sized ones you just hit with a bat because they are so slow.
Texas mosquitoes are tiny, really. Its those northern woods ones that need a baseball bat to kill.
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