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Old 05-24-2020, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Boerne has quite a diverse student population, actually. Definitely not uniformly wealthy, for sure.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Houston
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A note about working in rural areas: I have found that the housing prices may not be Austin levels, but quality rentals (I mean ones not totally nasty) that aren't ridiculously high priced can be extremely scarce. For-sale homes are often the same situation. The trope that finding quality affordable housing in rural towns is easier than big metros is usually NOT TRUE. Housing-wise, your best bets are almost always the suburbs of the big metros. The fast-growing ones will also have lots of teacher job openings.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX via San Antonio, TX
6,917 posts, read 9,445,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Here's a school district map for the San Antonio metro area.



I'd consider Alamo Heights, Northeast, Boerne, and Northside ISDs to be wealthy, or at least contain the wealthiest pockets of San Antonio. If you own a $1 million house in San Antonio, chances are pretty great it will fall into one of those four districts.
I think there is a very objective way to define “wealth” in the state of Texas and that is by the amount of money a district sends back to the state. Whether their actual student population is wealthy or not, the property taxes sent back is how the state defines wealth.

So, given numbers from 2018 (and pre last legislative session and the changes made) Alamo heights is actually the wealthiest district in the city. And surprise, Austin ISD is the wealthiest because #gentrification and #transplants https://texasscorecard.com/local/whi...d-tax-in-2018/

I’d like to see this year’s numbers given the recapture formula has changed.
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Old 05-25-2020, 11:01 AM
 
Location: WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashbeeigh View Post
I think there is a very objective way to define “wealth” in the state of Texas and that is by the amount of money a district sends back to the state. Whether their actual student population is wealthy or not, the property taxes sent back is how the state defines wealth.

So, given numbers from 2018 (and pre last legislative session and the changes made) Alamo heights is actually the wealthiest district in the city. And surprise, Austin ISD is the wealthiest because #gentrification and #transplants https://texasscorecard.com/local/whi...d-tax-in-2018/

I’d like to see this year’s numbers given the recapture formula has changed.
Yes, but property wealth does not equal student wealth. Sometimes it does but not always.

For example, in the Waco area there is a large industrial park that contains many of the largest Waco employers like Mars Candy, Sherwin Williams, Caterpillar, Amgen, etc. No one actually lives there but they pay millions in property taxes. By coincidence this large industrial park, which is within the city limits of Waco, actually falls into the suburban Midway ISD (which covers the towns of Woodway and Hewitt) not the inner-city Waco ISD. Here is the district map for Midway ISD. The boundary lines defy all logic. It looks very much like a gerrymandered legislative district and there are many other districts around the state that are much the same.



In the Waco area there are actually places where you can see the school district boundaries from space. Housing subdivisions get built on one side of the district line, but not on the other because of perceived differences between school districts.
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Old 05-25-2020, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX via San Antonio, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Yes, but property wealth does not equal student wealth. Sometimes it does but not always.

For example, in the Waco area there is a large industrial park that contains many of the largest Waco employers like Mars Candy, Sherwin Williams, Caterpillar, Amgen, etc. No one actually lives there but they pay millions in property taxes. By coincidence this large industrial park, which is within the city limits of Waco, actually falls into the suburban Midway ISD (which covers the towns of Woodway and Hewitt) not the inner-city Waco ISD. Here is the district map for Midway ISD. The boundary lines defy all logic. It looks very much like a gerrymandered legislative district and there are many other districts around the state that are much the same.



In the Waco area there are actually places where you can see the school district boundaries from space. Housing subdivisions get built on one side of the district line, but not on the other because of perceived differences between school districts.
Absolutely. Check out the demographics of Austin ISD. It is not a wealthy district. But again, to be objective and not subjective, the list I linked to is the best way to define wealth without digging through income info of all the state’s districts.
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Old 05-25-2020, 01:53 PM
 
Location: WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashbeeigh View Post
Absolutely. Check out the demographics of Austin ISD. It is not a wealthy district. But again, to be objective and not subjective, the list I linked to is the best way to define wealth without digging through income info of all the state’s districts.
Yes, of course. Because in Austin most of the wealthy white families with kids move out to places like Eanes or Lake Travis school districts and the schools within Austin ISD are going to be more heavily poor and Hispanic.

That said, the general rule is going to apply. If we use Austin as an example, finding a teaching job in say the Eanes, Leander, or Lake Travis School districts is going to be super tough because those are the affluent districts in the Austin area. Whereas teaching jobs in the poorer areas of East Austin will likely be easier. Although still tough because it is still Austin and a place where young teachers want to live. But if you say 2 hours down to Victoria TX nearer the gulf coast then teaching jobs are probably going to be much easier to find as not a lot of young people are dying to move to Victoria. I just picked Victoria off the top of my head, but looking at the job listings for Victoria ISD I see a ton of openings:

https://visdjobs.visd.net/eFP5.1/Rec...sitionTypeDesc

Compare that to say Eanes ISD in the wealthy Austin suburbs which barely has any ordinary teacher openings that aren't SpEd or coaching positions: https://skyward-eisdprod.iscorp.com/...x/rapplmnu03.w
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Old 05-26-2020, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
1,099 posts, read 633,814 times
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Something else you need to consider: Most Texas school districts do not participate in Social Security. Teacher retirements are pathetic, according to my college friends who retired after 30+ years of teaching in Texas public schools, and you may find your SS benefits to be offset. It's a nightmare.
https://www.trs.texas.gov/Pages/acti...ty_at_trs.aspx
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Old 05-26-2020, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Grapevine, Texas
10,217 posts, read 21,674,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Yes, of course. Because in Austin most of the wealthy white families with kids move out to places like Eanes or Lake Travis school districts and the schools within Austin ISD are going to be more heavily poor and Hispanic.
This is also the case with Dallas ISD and Fort Worth ISD. The wealthy families (of any race) escape to the suburbs, and the only ones left in the urban areas are the disadvantaged kids. Any wealthy family that still lives in an urban area sends their kids to private schools.
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Old 05-26-2020, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,500 posts, read 30,034,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
Something else you need to consider: Most Texas school districts do not participate in Social Security. Teacher retirements are pathetic, according to my college friends who retired after 30+ years of teaching in Texas public schools, and you may find your SS benefits to be offset. It's a nightmare.
https://www.trs.texas.gov/Pages/acti...ty_at_trs.aspx
Don't know what you would get out of the current retirement system, but my sister retired after 30 years of teaching when the unrestricted rule of 80 applied (started at 22, taught for 30 years, retired at 52, surpassing the rule of 80 by a couple years). She was very good at what she did and she made sure to max out her 'basis' for the last three or four years - bilingual, taught AP/College classes, coached the track team, curriculum director, and had a masters (which upped the base pay). Sure, she is not rolling in the dough, but I think she is making just under $50k per year and teaches for a couple nights a week at a local college to supplement her income.

I understand health benefits are not great, but that is not unique to the TRS. You can blame the pension people all you want, but it is insurance companies and the health industry that is driving that.
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Old 05-26-2020, 08:21 PM
 
Location: WA
3,619 posts, read 4,627,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
Something else you need to consider: Most Texas school districts do not participate in Social Security. Teacher retirements are pathetic, according to my college friends who retired after 30+ years of teaching in Texas public schools, and you may find your SS benefits to be offset. It's a nightmare.
https://www.trs.texas.gov/Pages/acti...ty_at_trs.aspx
The OP is coming from CA which is also a state in which the school districts do not participate in social security. So nothing new there. The difference is that CA has a relatively generous pension program, TX does not. More importantly, the TX teacher's pension is not inflation-adjusted. The payout you get on the day you retire is still the same exact monthly payout you will get when you are 95 and inflation has whittled it down to 25% of the original value. So there are very old retired teachers in TX that might have had a comfortable retirement when they retired in say 1990 but are really suffering now as they are still living on 1990 dollars. At least CA and many other states have pension programs with a COLA that goes up with inflation, just like social security.

On the plus side, TX does have good 403(b) options. In most districts you can just set up a DIY 403(b) plan directly through Vanguard or Fidelity, with no fees. That beats the heck out of most other states where teachers are forced into horrible variable annuity plans with excessive fees.

But yes, coming from a teaching job in CA the OP will be looking at a substantial reduction in retirement pension. I don't know the exact percentage, but could be as much as a 50% reduction compared to CA because the program is less generous and base salaries are lower.
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