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Old 05-27-2020, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX via San Antonio, TX
6,917 posts, read 9,445,123 times
Reputation: 4069

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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Yes, of course. Because in Austin most of the wealthy white families with kids move out to places like Eanes or Lake Travis school districts and the schools within Austin ISD are going to be more heavily poor and Hispanic.

That said, the general rule is going to apply. If we use Austin as an example, finding a teaching job in say the Eanes, Leander, or Lake Travis School districts is going to be super tough because those are the affluent districts in the Austin area. Whereas teaching jobs in the poorer areas of East Austin will likely be easier. Although still tough because it is still Austin and a place where young teachers want to live. But if you say 2 hours down to Victoria TX nearer the gulf coast then teaching jobs are probably going to be much easier to find as not a lot of young people are dying to move to Victoria. I just picked Victoria off the top of my head, but looking at the job listings for Victoria ISD I see a ton of openings:

https://visdjobs.visd.net/eFP5.1/Rec...sitionTypeDesc

Compare that to say Eanes ISD in the wealthy Austin suburbs which barely has any ordinary teacher openings that aren't SpEd or coaching positions: https://skyward-eisdprod.iscorp.com/...x/rapplmnu03.w
And all the teachers want to be there.
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:50 PM
 
165 posts, read 62,936 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
Something else you need to consider: Most Texas school districts do not participate in Social Security. Teacher retirements are pathetic, according to my college friends who retired after 30+ years of teaching in Texas public schools, and you may find your SS benefits to be offset. It's a nightmare.
https://www.trs.texas.gov/Pages/acti...ty_at_trs.aspx
you are so right about this. My aunt tried to warn me about this but she isn't very articulate. She just stated that you don't get any SS and I just thought to myself but I have TRS so what the hell is she talking about. But I did know that TRS wasn't SS, then I found out about how TRS will affect my SS in retirement. Yikes.
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Old 05-30-2020, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX via San Antonio, TX
6,917 posts, read 9,445,123 times
Reputation: 4069
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelloKitty76 View Post
you are so right about this. My aunt tried to warn me about this but she isn't very articulate. She just stated that you don't get any SS and I just thought to myself but I have TRS so what the hell is she talking about. But I did know that TRS wasn't SS, then I found out about how TRS will affect my SS in retirement. Yikes.
There are a handful of districts that do take out social security. I made a point of staying with a district that does to be safe. You can google a list of those districts. Although, it does kind of blow getting money taken out for both. But, in the end it's for the better.
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Old 06-02-2020, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,295 posts, read 2,197,212 times
Reputation: 1464
Please call me out if I´m missing something here, but...

I thought about this very issue of SS and TRS. What I´m at peace with doing is taking the money that would have been used to pay SS, not to mention that is available thanks to no state income tax, and putting that into an IRA. Maxing it out.

Teachers in my home state of Louisiana don´t pay SS either, so I don´t have much of anything in the system. The real risk for Texas teachers out there would be to work in a district that pays SS, and then switch to one that doesn´t. Wouldn´t that trigger a major reduction in benefits later on? It´s something to think about.
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Old 06-02-2020, 11:09 AM
 
Location: WA
3,619 posts, read 4,627,525 times
Reputation: 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Please call me out if I´m missing something here, but...

I thought about this very issue of SS and TRS. What I´m at peace with doing is taking the money that would have been used to pay SS, not to mention that is available thanks to no state income tax, and putting that into an IRA. Maxing it out.

Teachers in my home state of Louisiana don´t pay SS either, so I don´t have much of anything in the system. The real risk for Texas teachers out there would be to work in a district that pays SS, and then switch to one that doesn´t. Wouldn´t that trigger a major reduction in benefits later on? It´s something to think about.
Yes. Social Security has something called Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) that will reduce your social security payment by up to 50% if you spent time in a job that doesn't pay into social security. It applies more broadly than just teaching.

So, for example, I worked in another profession for 15 years before getting into teaching in TX. I taught for 10 years in TX then moved on to another state where teachers do pay into social security. My TX teaching pension is what it is. It will be small because I only taught 10 years but the TX teacher's pension is unaffected by any of this.

What will happen is that when I go to draw social security they will claw back up to 50% of the value of my TX teacher's pension. In other words, my social security gets slashed because I worked in a non-social security job. It very much sucks and is unfair. But it is how the law works.

This affects any teacher who teaches in a state where the state or school districts don't participate in social security. Also many other public employees like police, fire, municipal employees who are similarly situated. I think teachers and public employees in at least 20 states are in this situation.

And it affects any teachers who move states or move into teaching from another profession, or move out of teaching into another profession. Which is millions of teachers.

The history is that many of these teacher pension programs pre-dated social security. And when the social security act was passed, public pension programs that already existed were given the option of: (1) keeping their pension in place instead of social security, (2) abandoning their pension to join social security, or (3) doing both. Many states and localities like most in TX didn't want to face the double payroll costs of both a pension and social security so they opted out long ago. Other states like here in WA opted in to social security so teacher's pay into both programs.

The only way to escape from this penalty is to cash out your TX teacher's pension and roll it into an IRA before you retire. But that is costly because you only get to keep your half of your pension contributions, not the half your district made on your behalf. So the sums will be much smaller than the pension itself would be worth over time.

Here's the SS page on WEP: https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/prog...provision.html
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Old 06-03-2020, 04:45 AM
 
165 posts, read 62,936 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Yes. Social Security has something called Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) that will reduce your social security payment by up to 50% if you spent time in a job that doesn't pay into social security. It applies more broadly than just teaching.

So, for example, I worked in another profession for 15 years before getting into teaching in TX. I taught for 10 years in TX then moved on to another state where teachers do pay into social security. My TX teaching pension is what it is. It will be small because I only taught 10 years but the TX teacher's pension is unaffected by any of this.

What will happen is that when I go to draw social security they will claw back up to 50% of the value of my TX teacher's pension. In other words, my social security gets slashed because I worked in a non-social security job. It very much sucks and is unfair. But it is how the law works.

This affects any teacher who teaches in a state where the state or school districts don't participate in social security. Also many other public employees like police, fire, municipal employees who are similarly situated. I think teachers and public employees in at least 20 states are in this situation.

And it affects any teachers who move states or move into teaching from another profession, or move out of teaching into another profession. Which is millions of teachers.

The history is that many of these teacher pension programs pre-dated social security. And when the social security act was passed, public pension programs that already existed were given the option of: (1) keeping their pension in place instead of social security, (2) abandoning their pension to join social security, or (3) doing both. Many states and localities like most in TX didn't want to face the double payroll costs of both a pension and social security so they opted out long ago. Other states like here in WA opted in to social security so teacher's pay into both programs.

The only way to escape from this penalty is to cash out your TX teacher's pension and roll it into an IRA before you retire. But that is costly because you only get to keep your half of your pension contributions, not the half your district made on your behalf. So the sums will be much smaller than the pension itself would be worth over time.

Here's the SS page on WEP: https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/prog...provision.html
Thank you for explaining this. I heard about this situation.
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Old 06-08-2020, 08:26 PM
 
31,934 posts, read 49,828,868 times
Reputation: 17814
Quote:
Originally Posted by aingersoll88 View Post
Hi, my husband and I are over California and our awful Governor Newsom. We’re seeking refuge somewhere less liberal. We are wondering if any teachers can chime in where jobs are posted in Texas.

For example, most school districts post their openings on Edjoin. Not many states use it though. There must be an equivalent, but I can’t find it.

Thanks!
Texas Education Agency works by regions
Search for the Dallas and the Fort Worth regions
Each site has a jobs board where districts, private schools and charter schools post jobs
You can look at each region
Dallas and FTW are 10 and 11 I think
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Old 06-08-2020, 08:27 PM
 
31,934 posts, read 49,828,868 times
Reputation: 17814
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Yes. Social Security has something called Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) that will reduce your social security payment by up to 50% if you spent time in a job that doesn't pay into social security. It applies more broadly than just teaching.

So, for example, I worked in another profession for 15 years before getting into teaching in TX. I taught for 10 years in TX then moved on to another state where teachers do pay into social security. My TX teaching pension is what it is. It will be small because I only taught 10 years but the TX teacher's pension is unaffected by any of this.

What will happen is that when I go to draw social security they will claw back up to 50% of the value of my TX teacher's pension. In other words, my social security gets slashed because I worked in a non-social security job. It very much sucks and is unfair. But it is how the law works.

This affects any teacher who teaches in a state where the state or school districts don't participate in social security. Also many other public employees like police, fire, municipal employees who are similarly situated. I think teachers and public employees in at least 20 states are in this situation.

And it affects any teachers who move states or move into teaching from another profession, or move out of teaching into another profession. Which is millions of teachers.

The history is that many of these teacher pension programs pre-dated social security. And when the social security act was passed, public pension programs that already existed were given the option of: (1) keeping their pension in place instead of social security, (2) abandoning their pension to join social security, or (3) doing both. Many states and localities like most in TX didn't want to face the double payroll costs of both a pension and social security so they opted out long ago. Other states like here in WA opted in to social security so teacher's pay into both programs.

The only way to escape from this penalty is to cash out your TX teacher's pension and roll it into an IRA before you retire. But that is costly because you only get to keep your half of your pension contributions, not the half your district made on your behalf. So the sums will be much smaller than the pension itself would be worth over time.

Here's the SS page on WEP: https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/prog...provision.html
Some districts like Dallas ISD pay into SS
The state/community college systems pay into SS
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Old 06-08-2020, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,500 posts, read 30,034,829 times
Reputation: 7140
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
Some districts like Dallas ISD pay into SS
The state/community college systems pay into SS
Yes, but you are still subject to windfall cut-backs, it really sucks for those that have to pay in and only get a comparative fraction of the value that a non-teacher would get. Or at least that is my understanding.
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Old 06-08-2020, 11:57 PM
 
Location: WA
3,619 posts, read 4,627,525 times
Reputation: 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainwreck20 View Post
Yes, but you are still subject to windfall cut-backs, it really sucks for those that have to pay in and only get a comparative fraction of the value that a non-teacher would get. Or at least that is my understanding.
No, you are not. As long as your job pays into social security then the WEP does not apply. It also doesn't apply if you have enough years of earnings in jobs that do pay into social security. I think you need at least 20 years of substantial earnings. And there is a stair-stepped phase-out.

The WEP only applies if you have a pension from years of working in a job with a pension that doesn't pay into social security.
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