U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-03-2021, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,296 posts, read 12,254,075 times
Reputation: 2742

Advertisements

For what it's worth, indicates Dallas as the highest risk of bad weather. And, there are lots of sites that tell one of the number of tornadoes in all counties and all states, a plethora of information.

Also, in 1997, Jarrell, Texas (40 miles from Austin) was hit with an F5, one of the most violent tornadoes in modern U.S. history. The death and destruction was horrid.

Texas is Tornado Alley.

Tornado Alley | Tornado Season 2020 Outlook Forecast Predictions

Last edited by Yac; 01-04-2021 at 07:11 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-04-2021, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Houston
3,364 posts, read 2,657,623 times
Reputation: 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canine*Castle View Post
For what it's worth, indicates Dallas as the highest risk of bad weather. And, there are lots of sites that tell one of the number of tornadoes in all counties and all states, a plethora of information.

Also, in 1997, Jarrell, Texas (40 miles from Austin) was hit with an F5, one of the most violent tornadoes in modern U.S. history. The death and destruction was horrid.

Texas is Tornado Alley.

Tornado Alley | Tornado Season 2020 Outlook Forecast Predictions
Yes, tornadoes happen in TX (and the states to our north), but honestly unless you have a major phobia about them, they shouldn't affect your home location decision. A lot of folks in OK deal with it by building storm cellars.

I live in Houston, and the risk from and home location considerations due to floods and hurricanes are far greater than what folks in the other parts of TX deal with from tornado risk.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2021, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
56,329 posts, read 44,643,161 times
Reputation: 79697
Quote:
Originally Posted by aen935 View Post
No! I haven't. That's the part that scares me and makes me apprehensive to move, for sure. Haha. My husband has been in Arizona in the summer and says it's pretty awful, but manageable (I also have family who are there that say it was hard at first but they adjusted). I've spent a lot of time in Florida in the summer and know that type of humidity and heat! I'm not sure how it compares to Texas though. Do you have experience with both states?

Ideally I would love to spend time in Texas and Arizona in the summer to get a taste, and we could definitely make another trip. However, we do have a blended family and so we are working with the other household to make the move possible (the parent in the other household is from Arizona). We are trying to keep the kids on a week on/week off schedule, as we started that when the pandemic hit and everyone was doing online learning. It seems to work well for our families and it seems healthier (for the most part) for the kids to see both sets of parents on a more even schedule. Because of this, we are attempting to be able to move before the next school year begins (and unfortunately that means before the fall).
Honestly, I think you should visit in August. Late August is even better. Every single September, I get the hell outta Dodge (TX) because by September I am so sick to death of heat I could scream. When I say heat, I mean temps of around 100 degrees. And I live in NE Texas which is a bit cooler than much of Texas is. "Cooler" is a relative term by the way.

Most of Texas does not enjoy four distinct seasons. I mean, we have them but summer is by far the longest. A running joke is "Texas has four seasons - Almost Summer, Summer, Still Summer and Christmas." But I will say this - the winters and springs are fabulous here! And we enjoy copious sunshine, which is nice. I just visited some friends and family in Ohio and brrrrrr, it's cold and gray and wet there. I was so glad to get back to our bright, nippy but not freezing, big Texas skies! But I know it's cyclical and that by August I will be tired of being hot, and by September I will be beyond tired of it!

Much of Texas gets really spectacular thunderstorms and even tornadoes or tornado watches or warnings. Actually, I do enjoy stormy weather so that's a great fit. But you need to know it's a reality, especially in the spring. The Hill Country that you're interested in is prone to flash flooding during heavy rains. Also, really check out the water supply of any place you're interested in, especially in central Texas.

Please keep us posted!

Oh, to the other person who said that there are left lane restrictions for large trucks in Texas - they are allowed (not universal in other words), but only under some conditions. From TXDOT:
Quote:
The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), cities, and counties are allowed to enact lane restrictions under certain circumstances. These restrictions typically prohibit trucks with three or more axles from using a particular traffic lane of a freeway with three or more lanes.
Sign Guidelines and Applications Manual: Restricted Truck Lanes
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2021, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
56,329 posts, read 44,643,161 times
Reputation: 79697
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
I don't have experience with Texas vs Florida weather. Generally speaking, DFW, San Antonio, and Austin will be less humid than Florida, but considerably hotter. Temps in the 90s are common in June, July, August, and September, and you can expect 1-2 dozen days above 100 in a typical summer (fewer in DFW, more in Austin and San Antonio).

Houston's weather will be the closest to Florida's. A little more humid than the other cities, and the slightest bit cooler.

The eastern half of Texas won't be as hot as the Arizona desert, but it's not exactly cool, either. The added humidity means overnight lows in the upper 60s to mid 70s during the dog days of summer. You won't be leaving windows open at night during the summer.
I agree with this but I want to add that in the dog days of summer, it's not unusual for temps to remain in the 80s till late at night in NE Texas. It's typical for the coolest temps during the night to still be above the inside AC temps and it just doesn't feel fresh and cool outside at any point in any day or night for weeks, especially during July through mid September.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2021, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
56,329 posts, read 44,643,161 times
Reputation: 79697
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashbeeigh View Post
While tornadoes are frequent in the north texas area, Austin and San Antonio are in the very very bottom tip of tornado alley. While they do happen, and we get our fair share of tornado watches and every once in a while f1 and maybe f2 tornadoes, it’s not so frequent that it needs to be a worry. We’re more likely to get a tornado from a tropical storm then from a wild cold front that’s coming through. Most central and south Texans worry more about flash flooding then tornadoes. We are known as the flash flood capital of the world, not just the country. Checking the fema flood plain map is a frequent process in the home buying process since we’ve had a handful of 100 year floods in the last thirty years. Houston has to worry about hurricanes and the occasional tornado from those storms more then the wild fronts. I’m not as familiar with their weather as I am with SA and Austin.
I just want to point out that I have lived in NE Texas for about 30 years and yes, we do have tornado watches and even warnings just about every year. That being said, I've never experienced a bit of significant damage from a tornado, nor has anyone I know. Typically it's exciting but uneventful. Unless you do get hit, which is extremely rare but it does happen.

I love big storms and we do get some pretty spectacular thunderstorms here in Texas.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2021, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
56,329 posts, read 44,643,161 times
Reputation: 79697
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristieP View Post
Tornadoes are not “frequent” in the DFW area. In fact, they are fairly rare. In a normal year, we may have less than 5 storms that produce a tornado. It is highly unlikely that your home would ever be damaged by a tornado, and most Texans have never even seen a tornado. So, don’t make a decision based on whether an area could possibly have a tornado.

One thing to note: school buses in Texas are not required if the student lives a mile or less from the school without crossing a major road. Most suburban school districts avoid busing wherever possible, especially at the elementary level. For junior high and high school, your kids may be able to ride a bus.
Right on both counts.

The last tornado I actually saw was the one that hit Fort Hood around 1989. For the OP, Fort Hood is in central Texas, not NE Texas. Wow, that was a huge tornado too.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2021, 11:35 AM
 
14,128 posts, read 6,831,490 times
Reputation: 8904
Quote:
Originally Posted by aen935 View Post
Hi! My family and I are considering a move. We are debating between Texas and Arizona. My husband has never been to Texas so we're taking a week trip down in January for him to get a taste (and for me to get a better feel, as I've only been to the Dallas area and San Antonio a couple of times).

I'm interested in the Hill Country area/San Antonio/Austin area, although I would consider Dallas as well. Love the thought of Houston and coastal cities, as I LOVE water (we're from Michigan), but I don't want to be on the coast because of Hurricanes.

We're flying into DFW (it was much cheaper than the other major airports). My thoughts were this for an itinerary:

21st (half day) - drive to San Antonio
22nd - San Antonio
23rd - Drive to San Marcos / Kyle
24th - Night out in Frederickson (Check out Marble Falls?)
25th - Drive Austin
26th - Austin
27th - Drive to Dallas
28th - Fly out

I know it's A LOT of travel each day. That's fine with us. I think of this as a little taste of a large area. Is there any place you think we should skip or spend more time in? Are there areas of Texas I should really consider? It looks like we would pretty much be seeing a narrow north/south portion of the state. Would it be worth diverging off the path with our quick trip?

Thanks so much in advance! I appreciate constructive and helpful feedback.
DFW Airport is between Dallas and Fort Worth. To drive South toward Austin, San Antonio, the Hill Country - you will need to reach I-35 (most direct South Freeway) and the closest way is into Tarrant County (Arlington, Fort Worth). You really need to check out Fort Worth. Lots of Museums, great Downtown, easy to get around and all around great City. Very friendly.

As for airport access .... easy anywhere in the DFW area and it’s a large Hub. Austin’s Airport is on the south side.... probably 30-45 minutes from most of Austin Metro unless you are on the South end. Hill Country would use the San Antonio Airport. Both Austin & San Antonio will have more limited Air Choices. You will find Lakes and hiking/parks all over Texas & particularly in the areas you are considering. Hill Country is cooler/drier and property more expensive. If you like Ocean/Beaches - then any Central Texas location puts you about a 3 hour drive to Mustang & North Padre Beaches near Corpus Christi.

I think it’s difficult to judge any State from the Freeway - Freeways are for getting from point A to point B in the fasted way possible ... consider some alternate routes on the way down or way back. Best alternate route (N/S thru Central Texas) will be on the West side of Central Texas, State Hwy 16. You could take that from Fort Worth (explore the Hill Country) cut over to San Antonio and the come back up the Center with Stops along I-35, taking I-35 East to Dallas. Odd, but I-35 splits into East and West at Hillsboro, Texas. From DFW, you have to either go to Dallas or Fort Worth to get to I-35E or I-35W to go South. W is better unless you teally want yo go to Houston ... which I don’t think you have time for at all.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2021, 11:48 PM
 
Location: East Texas, with the Clan of the Cave Bear
2,329 posts, read 4,641,843 times
Reputation: 2887
Let's get some clarity on the Houston flooding thing . . . It floods on the coastal plain especially with all the development (concrete/paving). North of Houston, 70 miles from the coast there is drainage so most roadways stay passable. I despise metro Houston but northward deserves a look.

Guidelines for minimizing hurricane effects include getting 100-125 miles from the coast. 150 miles is perfect (I live 70 miles inland and have weathered several hurricanes and a once in 1000 year flood. The rain didn't affect me at all at my home (although I was marooned at work in Beaumont for 4 days due to all roads flooded). Hurricane winds were my only issue just because of the forests. By the time a Cat4 hurricane gets 100 miles inland it's losing it's punch and at 150 miles it is probably only a tropical storm or cat 1 hurricane (75 mph wind).

So if the green part of Texas draws you (east of Interstate 45) and 150 miles inland should be your goal points.

aen935 . . . I know this is your 1st trip feeling this huge state out but you must check out the parts of Texas where there are forests. City / towns to investigate are Tyler, Nacogdoches, Huntsville are the larger ones but perusing a map will give you other towns much smaller (Palestine, Crockett, Marshall and many smaller). Tyler area is worth the look.

You Dallas area folks. Aren't there lots of thunderstorms with lots of hail in the region. Having never lived there I don't know but I frequent a fishing forum that is 75% DFW folks and there seems to be a lot of talk about roof replacement and cracked windshields. Being in East Texas I never see that type of weather.

Negatives about East Texas is a more Florida type humidity but that is what supports all the greenery. Closer to the Gulf the more humidity.

I really like the western parts of the Hill Country too though. Bandera, Blanco, Fredericksburg, Kerrville. Be careful driving at night and evenings there because of the deer. Much smaller deer than in Michigan but still will jack your vehicle up.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 12:45 PM
 
Location: TX Hill Country
26 posts, read 29,042 times
Reputation: 33
The Austin area is the last place I would live in TX. It's like a mini-CA. Over-priced & over-crowded. It seems driving to SA, then going to New Braunfels & San Marcos is redundant. You will go through San Marcos & New Braunfels driving from DFW to SA. Just stay in one of those towns from the get go, then drive to SA. I would do a loop through Marble Falls(Blue Bonnet Cafe), Wimberley, Llano(Cooper's Old time BBQ), Enchanted Rock, Fredericksburg, Kerrville(The Empty Cross) over to Bandera on the way to Utopia(The Laurel Tree-Saturday's only). On the road to Utopia you may want to check out Lost Maples State Natural Area. If you're going from SA to Kerrville, see the Empty Cross just N of I-10, then go SH-16 To Fredericksburg. going E on 290 to Johnson city, then N on 281 to Marble Falls is a nice ride. Then you could go to Llano to experience Cooper's Old Time BBQ. going S on 16 back to Fredericksburg, don't miss Enchanted Rock and, if in the spring, Willow City Loop. Happy Travels!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top