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Old 01-24-2012, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Floresville, TX
169 posts, read 393,990 times
Reputation: 113

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Sounds like is it/was a "neighborhood", but perhaps never an organized community.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joqua View Post
Reminds me of Luchenbach! Not sure anyone would ever have heard of it had it not been given a presence in C&W music and later with concerts held there by Willie Nelson and others.

Difference is Luckenbach is in fact a current-day existing town.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
4,276 posts, read 7,762,424 times
Reputation: 3671
Quote:
Originally Posted by m48xhp View Post
Difference is Luckenbach is in fact a current-day existing town.
It was never a town - and isn't today. My point is that it might be past history today if it hadn't been kept on the map by country music enthusiasts.

From Wikipedia:
Quote:
Luckenbach is an unincorporated community ... It consists of 9.142 acres (37,000 m2) ...
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Floresville, TX
169 posts, read 393,990 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by joqua View Post
It was never a town - and isn't today. My point is that it might be past history today if it hadn't been kept on the map by country music enthusiasts.

From Wikipedia:
well, yes. that is why i said town, not city. i guess that was a misnomer on my part. I guess I meant that it is a current day individual community, while lonesome dove seems to have been an unorganized neighborhood of sorts that has been swallowed by the southlake area some time ago.
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,791 posts, read 43,858,884 times
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The Texas State Historical Association website has two references for "Lonesome Dove".

Quote:
GRAPEVINE, TX (TARRANT COUNTY) | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)
Grapevine, Texas:

In 1846 Lonesome Dove Baptist Church was established at the settlement. About 1854 James Tracy Morehead, A. F. Leonard, Henry Suggs, and others met to lay out the town and arrange for a post office. Judge Morehead suggested the name Grape Vine for the town, as it was located on the edge of the Grape Vine Prairie, which in turn had taken its name from the Grape Vine Springs.
So the Church was established there before the town was named Grapevine. It would not be unusual if some people refereed to it back then as Lonesome Dove.

Quote:
KELLER, TX | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)
Keller, Texas
The Lonesome Dove Baptist Church sent some members, among them Daniel Barcroft and Permelia Allen, to establish the Mount Gilead Baptist Church in 1852.
Both are in North Texas so they don't fit the description of Lonesome Dove, which was near the Mexican border.

Quote:
It is 1876.[5] Captain Augustus "Gus" McCrae and Captain Woodrow F. Call, two famous ex–Texas Rangers, run a livery called the Hat Creek Cattle Company and Livery Emporium in the small dusty Texas border town of Lonesome Dove.

Last edited by CptnRn; 01-25-2012 at 01:07 PM..
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Old 01-25-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,791 posts, read 43,858,884 times
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Quote:
The basic story is a slightly fictionalized account of Charles Goodnight's and Oliver Loving's cattle drive. In particular, Loving (Gus) was attacked by Indians, and died several weeks later of blood poisoning with Goodnight (Call) at his side. Goodnight honored Loving's dying request to be taken back to Texas for burial.
Taking hints from the story:

Charles Goodnight was sometimes known as the "father of the Texas Panhandle."

Quote:
In order to take advantage of available grass, timber, water, and game, Goodnight founded in 1876 what was to become the first Texas Panhandle ranch, the JA Ranch, in the Palo Duro Canyon[3] of the south Texas Panhandle.
Quote:
Loving was born in Hopkins County, Kentucky. From 1833 to a decade later, Loving was a farmer in Muhlenburg County until he, his brother, and his brother-in-law moved their families to the Republic of Texas, where Loving received 640 acres (2.6 km²) of land in three patents spread through three counties Collin, Dallas, and Parker. He farmed and, to feed his growing family, hauled freight in his early years as a Texan.
Quote:
The Goodnight Loving Trail began at Fort Belknap (Texas), along part of the former route of the Butterfield Overland Mail, traveling through central Texas across the Staked Plains to Horsehead Crossing, north along the Pecos River and across Pope's Crossing, into New Mexico to Fort Sumner. The trail then continued north into Colorado up to Denver and was extended on into Wyoming.[
Quote:
Fort Belknap, located near Newcastle, Texas, was established in 1851 by brevet Brigadier William G. Belknap to protect the Texas frontier against raids by the Kiowa and Comanche.
So, in the real world, most of the Goodnight - Loving story took place in North Texas and the panhandle. Not all that far from the Lonesome Dove community of Grapevine, Texas.

Loving was wounded in a comanche attack while on the trail, he made it to Fort Sumner only to die there of gangrene, but not before Goodnight promised to bury his friend in Texas. Goodnight carried his body back to Texas as promised, where it was buried near Weatherford, TX

Last edited by CptnRn; 01-25-2012 at 01:36 PM..
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Floresville, TX
169 posts, read 393,990 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
The Texas State Historical Association website has two references for "Lonesome Dove".

So the Church was established there before the town was named Grapevine. It would not be unusual if some people refereed to it back then as Lonesome Dove.

Both are in North Texas so they don't fit the description of Lonesome Dove, which was near the Mexican border.
Similar to the movie "The Sugarland Express". Named for an actual place (Sugar Land), but in the movie, the geographic location of Sugarland, TX was also near the Mexico border.
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Old 04-08-2012, 06:33 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,991 times
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In the book, Lonesome Dove is located 100 miles upriver from Matamoros. That would put it in Starr County.
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Old 04-22-2012, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Down the road a bit
556 posts, read 1,435,108 times
Reputation: 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
Taking hints from the story:

Charles Goodnight was sometimes known as the "father of the Texas Panhandle."



So, in the real world, most of the Goodnight - Loving story took place in North Texas and the panhandle. Not all that far from the Lonesome Dove community of Grapevine, Texas.

Loving was wounded in a comanche attack while on the trail, he made it to Fort Sumner only to die there of gangrene, but not before Goodnight promised to bury his friend in Texas. Goodnight carried his body back to Texas as promised, where it was buried near Weatherford, TX
Bose Ikard is also laid to rest in Weatherford's Greenwood Cemetery.....he was the former slave who became a lifelong friend of Charles Goodnight. He inspired the character "Deets" in Lonesome Dove.

His headstone is etched with this bit of poetry:

"Bose Ikard served with me four years on the Goodnight-Loving Trail, never shirked a duty or disobeyed an order, rode with me in many stampedes, participated in three engagements with Comanches, splendid behavior." - C. Goodnight
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Old 05-01-2013, 03:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,645 times
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Default Lonesome Dove Texas

Deductive reasoning tells me that it was located along the Texas/ Mexico border. That would explain how they swept into Mexico and back in one evening. Also if you follow the list of rivers crossed and the fact they went through the LLano also tells us that same thing. The book is based on two actual people Mr. Charles Goodnight and Mr. Oliver Loving. There is a Goodnight and Loving Texas...both named after these individuals. The book and movie are very accurate to the true story as they kept meticulous records of their exploits. The shootout with the indians along the river bank was exactly as it happened in real life except that Loving had the arrow go through his arm and side....not in the leg as in the movie/ book. He was escaped in the river as the movie depicts but was taken by mexican vaqueros to Fort Sumner, not Ogallala. That is where Loving died. Goodnight took his body back to Weatherford Texas. This can all be found at The Texas Historical Society.
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:52 AM
Status: "We're all broken, that's how the light gets in." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
55,818 posts, read 44,244,762 times
Reputation: 78988
All of Texas is Lonesome Dove - except for Dallas!
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