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Old 11-24-2012, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Toledo, OH
896 posts, read 1,857,876 times
Reputation: 860

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I live in Library Village and can attest to its future potential. There's a lot of active residents around here who would gladly welcome positive development and investment. At one point, the city designated our neighborhood as a model or special project they would be working on, since we have a lot if the elements in place to become a great neighborhood, but were at the crucial tipping point of easily becoming a wonderful neighborhood again or succumbing to growing crime problems and disinvestment. Library Village has most of the elements to become a nice walkable, urban neighborhood. Interesting streets, a healthy stock of 1920s houses, and a business corridor ready to be developed into a walkable, "urban village".

Library Village won't thrive due to proximity downtown. Library Village will grow via what it already has within its confines that attracts people. I picture Library Village becoming like Coventry Village, or the Cedar/Lee area in Cleveland Heights....I think those are examples of realistically achievable futures for Library Village.
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Old 11-24-2012, 10:40 AM
 
4,861 posts, read 9,326,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313 TUxedo View Post
True, but forget about walking to and from downtown from LV (it's almost to the Michigan line).
The OP didn't say anything about wanting to be able to walk to downtown from where he buys, that was brought up by a PP.
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Old 11-24-2012, 10:47 AM
 
4,861 posts, read 9,326,932 times
Reputation: 7762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tobias C View Post
I live in Library Village and can attest to its future potential. There's a lot of active residents around here who would gladly welcome positive development and investment. At one point, the city designated our neighborhood as a model or special project they would be working on, since we have a lot if the elements in place to become a great neighborhood, but were at the crucial tipping point of easily becoming a wonderful neighborhood again or succumbing to growing crime problems and disinvestment. Library Village has most of the elements to become a nice walkable, urban neighborhood. Interesting streets, a healthy stock of 1920s houses, and a business corridor ready to be developed into a walkable, "urban village".

Library Village won't thrive due to proximity downtown. Library Village will grow via what it already has within its confines that attracts people. I picture Library Village becoming like Coventry Village, or the Cedar/Lee area in Cleveland Heights....I think those are examples of realistically achievable futures for Library Village.
I think what did LV in was the housing crash when the recession started. When housing prices plummeted, too many people from outside the area who have no stake in the neighborhood snapped up inexpensive properties and rented to anyone and everyone, which is kind of dragging things down. My fil sold his house on N. Haven in the early 2000s for around $76,000 and he would be lucky to get $40,000 for it now.

I personally love LV. We lived there when our kids were little, and I have a lot of fond memories of walking along those tree-lined streets to take them up to the West Toledo Library for story hour or walking over to Milo's Meats to buy food for an inpromptu backyard picnic. We had the nicest neighbors there that we have ever had anywhere. I am rooting for it to hold up and for home values to go back up again once people realize what a great place it is to live and what quality is built into those old 1920s homes. Our house was built like a fortress, with gorgeous walnut woodwork, solid, textured plaster walls, leaded glass cabinets by the fireplace and hardwood floors. I don't think anyone could duplicate those beautiful old homes today, not at any price. The craftmanship is just gone.

Last edited by canudigit; 11-24-2012 at 11:15 AM..
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Old 11-24-2012, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Toledo, OH
896 posts, read 1,857,876 times
Reputation: 860
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
I think what did LV in was the housing crash when the recession started. When housing prices plummeted, too many people from outside the area who have no stake in the neighborhood snapped up inexpensive properties and rented to anyone and everyone, which is kind of dragging things down. My fil sold his house on N. Haven in the early 2000s for around $76,000 and he would be lucky to get $40,000 for it now.

Youre completely right. Houses have been foreclosed upon and have been turned into rentals, and nothing against renters (ive been one), but like you said, they dont have much of a stake in the neighborhood. Crime is on the rise. Theres lots of burglaries, and violent crimes happen here and there. I bought my house here a year ago, solely on the premise that I have hope for the future of the neighborhood. I dont have children or anything, so its safer for me to take a risk, I feel. House values keep plummeting. I was able to buy my beautiful old home for just over $40k. It seems like the areas with the most rental properties are those on the periphery of the neighborhood, especially near Lewis (like North Haven). You hear about the most burglaries and other crimes around the periphery of the neighborhood, likewise. The areas in the central core of the neighborhood are the nicest I would say, the streets like Willys Parkway, Overland Parkway, and all the little random diagonal streets in between.

The good thing is Library Village isnt even close to too far gone. Theres still lots of attractive elements to the neighborhood. We have a little committee/organization that was originally called the Overland Park Project, where we discussed development topics, primarily the redevelopment of the old Willys-Overland Jeep site and our neighborhoods mutual relationship with it. This was the original intent but most of us are more interested in the redevelopment of the business district down Sylvania Ave. Sylvania Ave is now the main focus of the group and were working with an organization that helps neighborhoods come up with revitalization solutions. Over the past few months they have surveyed hundreds of people in the neighborhood collecting ideas and opinions of residents about how they feel about Library Village, what needs to change, and what things they would like to see. Its a good start, because with such studies, we can prove what we want and what were willing to support, to both the city, and to any potential businesses and developers. So needless to say, theres a little bit of a movement around here to be a great urban neighborhood again.
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Old 11-25-2012, 05:42 AM
 
4,861 posts, read 9,326,932 times
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I'm so glad to hear that people are working to keep LV a safe, viable, family neighborhood. It sure was when my dh was growing up, and even when our kids were little in the '90s I felt safe enough there to walk the neighborhood for exercise in the wee hours of the morning before it got light outside, and no one ever bothered me. We lived on Sabra Rd. We sold our house for just over $80,000 in the late '90s because dh wanted to live in the country. The folks who bought our house from us then sold it for just over $100,000 in the mid-2000s right before the crash. I can't even imagine how much the people who bought it are upside down in their mortgage right now, unless they paid cash. The thing is, it is a gorgeous house! If it was sitting in Perrysburg or Maumee, even in this housing market it would probably bring at least $150,000. We have a friend who is a real estate broker and has been in the business for decades. He told us that the 43612 ZIP code was the hardest hit by the foreclosure crisis in the entire Toledo Metro, and I believe it. Every week they print the home sales records for each ZIP code in the Toledo Blade and the transactions in the 43612 almost always list a bank as one of the parties involved in the sale, either buying or selling.

Well, again, I'm thrilled that people are taking an active interest and not just letting the neighborhood go. It's way too valuable, both tangibly and intangibly, for that to happen. A group of us actually did start a neighborhood organization back in the early '90s, called the Library Village Association. LOL, you can thank us for all of those lovely speed bumps on the main thoroughfares. People used to fly up and down N. Haven to avoid Lewis and it was so dangerous, what with all the side streets and parked cars. We held various events to help raise neighborhood awareness, etc. and it was a lot of fun. People taking an interest and working to keep the neighborhood from going down the tubes is the thing that will decide what ultimately happens to LV.
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Old 11-25-2012, 06:05 PM
 
615 posts, read 1,394,323 times
Reputation: 489
I also like LV. It reminds me of how the neighborhood I grew up in (Cadieux/Harper, Detroit) looked when I was younger. In fact, LV looks and works just like my old neighborhood did in the early to mid 1980's, and it's nice to see a neighborhood like this still alive and well.
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