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Old 10-20-2012, 07:25 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 3,071,365 times
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Indeed - the shift towards suburbia among Italians over the past 30 years has been dramatic, in both New York and Toronto. The old urban Italian working class communities (like St. Clair West, Toronto, Bensonhurst, Brooklyn and Morris Park, Bronx) still exist but are a lot smaller than they used to be.

Manhattan's Little Italy hasn't really been Italian in years. Even in the 1920s it was declining as Italians began moving to the outer boroughs and by the 1950s and 1960s it was already a sliver of what it once was. It was pretty much bypassed by postwar immigrants who opted for outer borough Italian neighborhoods.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 10-20-2012 at 08:00 PM..
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:59 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 3,071,365 times
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Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
Yes, Montreal reminds me of an east coast American city, just further inland and French-speaking......Toronto just feels differant...not east coast, nor midwestern
How about Northeastern but not East Coast? The most "East Coast" city in the Great Lakes region?
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Old 10-21-2012, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,336 posts, read 30,586,760 times
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Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Pish posh! How would we be able to put pressure on anyone? We don't have any power. All we do is just go about our lives casually in English and if Italians want to speak it to us in it we're perfectly happy about it. We aren't actively working to assimilate anybody, that's just the paranoia of the Francophone press getting into your head and confusing us with assimilationists in Ontario.
The anglo community in Montreal certainly does have power: economic especially. Becoming anglo in Quebec for many immigrants is also seen as a ticket to joining the North American mainstream.

And the issue about how can attend which schools (English vs French) is all about who assimilates to which group is it not? Correctly or not, anglos think that immigrants who go to French schools will be more likely to espouse separatist views.

Also, because of the high emigration rate for native-born anglos, some feel that the streaming of immigrants into French schools is depriving the anglo community of immigrants that it is entitled to and that it desperately needs to replace those who are leaving.

Immigrants (Italian or otherwise) to Montreal who integrate into the anglo community did not or do not do so simply ''naturally'' or because anglos are nicer or smell better. There are many factors at play.
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Old 09-09-2020, 01:08 PM
 
42 posts, read 7,751 times
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Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
Even though people don't seem to equate Toronto with being a huge Italian-North American center, i would venture to guess thatit probably has a higher percentage of Italians in its metro than Chicago or Philly, or even NYC. Anyone have real numbers?
Um, this isn't city-specific, but the US has 20,000,000 descended from Italians, roughly, compared to Canada's 1.5 million.

The states of New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey are the most proportionally Italian places on the continent. Toronto definitely does not have a higher percentage of Italians in it relative to NYC or Philadelphia. That's why. That answers your question.

I'm really tired of Canadians trying to play the "proportion" game. For any given ethnic demographic, they'll try to argue, erroneously, that they have a larger "proportion". Which begs the question: what do they think the US is comprised of, ethnically? And how un-diverse do they seriously think a population of 350 million is?
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Old 01-21-2021, 11:10 PM
 
25 posts, read 5,546 times
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I believe that except for Quebec, statistics show that immigrants in Canada tend to hold onto their original cultures and languages less than in the U.S., and assimilate even more quickly into the mainstream here.
It's quite literally the exact opposite, and I'm not sure how you can erroneously make this statement - ever heard of "American civic religion"? American culture is so hegemonic and so widely exported, that most immigrants are already half-American before they even get to America.

I recognize a greater visibility and ease of assimilation for a much larger array of ethnic groups in the US than I do in Canada. And most of these groups are larger, and more long standing in American society, than they are in Canada.
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