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Old 12-16-2011, 08:17 PM
 
1 posts, read 9,145 times
Reputation: 10

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Hello. I am interested in making the move to either montreal or Toronto. I have lived in the states my entire life though I do have Canadian citizenship due to the fact my parents are Canadian. I was wondering, if I do make the move, what social/welfare benefits do I have until I settle down and find the job or go to school? Would I be given welfare in the mean time? Will I be assisted in paying for school? If so how much? I am 18 years old, and am considering conducting my studies in Canada.

Also I have never received any CCTB benefits. If I do move, will I be able to still apply and receive the benefits from the previous years though I was never an applicant before, and I am no longer under 18?
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Old 12-17-2011, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,284 posts, read 32,697,609 times
Reputation: 10432
Can you speak French? If you choose Montreal your life will be a lot easier if you do.
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Oakville, ON
377 posts, read 1,625,552 times
Reputation: 435
It sounds like you just want to move here to ride our social gravy train. Please try to figure out your work/school situation before arriving here. Sorry if that sounds harsh, it would be nice if you at least attempted to contribute to our society before taking from it.
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:15 AM
 
35,316 posts, read 47,525,721 times
Reputation: 30869
You have to be here for a while before you can qualify for all that free socialist stuff. In fact you'll probably starve to death before you get your first free government paycheck..
PS if you were born in the USA you arent automatically a Canadian Citizen,you only qualify to be a Canadian citizen.. time to start the paperwork, start here=
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/index.asp
Could mean a fair bit of paperwork will be involved but if and when its finished and you are granted resident Canadian status you'll be privileged to all that free socialist stuff we get up here..

PS Why even bother going to school or getting a job,nanny state will provide your life for you..

Last edited by jambo101; 12-17-2011 at 09:53 AM..
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:26 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,743,418 times
Reputation: 3277
Quote:
Originally Posted by ballhog23 View Post
Hello. I am interested in making the move to either montreal or Toronto. I have lived in the states my entire life though I do have Canadian citizenship due to the fact my parents are Canadian. I was wondering, if I do make the move, what social/welfare benefits do I have until I settle down and find the job or go to school? Would I be given welfare in the mean time? Will I be assisted in paying for school? If so how much? I am 18 years old, and am considering conducting my studies in Canada.

Also I have never received any CCTB benefits. If I do move, will I be able to still apply and receive the benefits from the previous years though I was never an applicant before, and I am no longer under 18?
CCTB benefits are paid to the parents to assist in raising their child. You are already raised. Besides that, they are paid based on salaries on which Canadian tax is paid.

Canadians are not assisted in paying for school apart from the government subsidies paid to the university which lowers tuition for Canadian students overall. If you qualify to attend as a Canadian you would benefit from that by not being charged international student tuition rates - but you should check on what qualifies one as a Canadian for studies - I am not sure whether you at this point would be considered an international student as you have never lived in Canada.

I won't address your welfare questions. Firstly I don't know the answers, and secondly, even contemplating the intention of someone moving to any country with the idea of going on benefits from the outset does nasty things to my blood pressure.
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:05 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 3,647,217 times
Reputation: 797
If you are a Canadian citizen, no one can deny you your entitlements if you so qualified for them.

Our federal and provincial governments are already providing freebies to foreigners to lure them to emigrate to our country. The very day they step on to our soil, they are eligible for GST/HST credit plus a host of other programs such as CCTB, UCCB, Childcare supplements, ABA funding programs (upto C$60k in Alberta), free ESL, and etc.

Your Canadian parents now living in the US, must have their reasons if they agree to you returning to Canada now. I won't pry. God bless.


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Old 12-17-2011, 06:30 PM
 
1,726 posts, read 5,534,105 times
Reputation: 1371
Someone born outside of Canada to a Canadian parent is automatically a Canadian citizen. The principle is called jus sunguinis ("right of blood"). A person who was born as a Canadian citizen has a birthright to the benefits of protection under the laws of Canada, and that includes certain social benefits. While some programs, such as provincial health care plans, take 90 days to kick in after a person relocates to Canada, other benefits such as resident tuition rates are generally available to Canadian citizens regardless of the duration of their residence in Canada.
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Old 12-17-2011, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Oakville, ON
377 posts, read 1,625,552 times
Reputation: 435
Whether you're entitled benefits or not, it's probably prudent to have some money saved up to support yourself for the first couple of months.

I'm curious to know how somebody who projects themselves as a qualified welfare recipient intends to cover the costs of an international move, such as air/train fare, first and last months rent on a place to live, a buffer while you find work, and other basic necessities to get started in a new city. Whether entitled to them or not, no amount of welfare benefits are going to come close to covering these costs.
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:11 AM
 
35,316 posts, read 47,525,721 times
Reputation: 30869
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarp View Post
Someone born outside of Canada to a Canadian parent is automatically a Canadian citizen. The principle is called jus sunguinis ("right of blood"). A person who was born as a Canadian citizen has a birthright to the benefits of protection under the laws of Canada, and that includes certain social benefits. While some programs, such as provincial health care plans, take 90 days to kick in after a person relocates to Canada, other benefits such as resident tuition rates are generally available to Canadian citizens regardless of the duration of their residence in Canada.
He still has to go through the processes, arriving at the border saying my parents were Canadian therefore so am i,wheres the gravy train eh! just aint gonna get it.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:46 PM
 
1,726 posts, read 5,534,105 times
Reputation: 1371
He probably already has a Canadian passport. If not, he would probably go to the Canadian consulate nearest him and fill out the paperwork for a passport before coming to Canada.
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