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Old 05-06-2021, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
2,820 posts, read 4,104,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
You're right it is a bit confusing. Honestly I think more people call them by the station names, Bloor danforth line, Yonge line, scarborough etc etc.

When making announcements, the TTC broadcasts both the line number and the old commonplace name together, for example "Line 2 Bloor-Danforth". The subway lines in Toronto don't confuse me. You want confusing subway lines, try visiting New York and riding the Metro with its 24+ lines, several of which run local in one borough and express in another. The TTC bus system is another story however. For instance, when going to visit the Aga Khan Museum the last time I was in Toronto, I had to take Route #34C from Eglinton Station. However, two other similar sounding routes running on Eglinton Avenue but with different destinations. #34B and #34A also load at Eglinton Station. I nearly got on board #34A and luckily I asked the driver if the route would take me to the museum upon which he said no, I had to take #34C or else I would have gotten lost getting there. I really think the TTC ought to stop naming so many multiple branches of one single bus route and add more route numbers instead.

But I digress. I think Toronto is unique in a way that they like to do things their own way and there's nothing wrong with that.
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Old Yesterday, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,685 posts, read 2,135,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's a worlwide trend to move towards numbers (or letters in some cases) for subway lines.
Not doubting you, but I don't see Chicago going to numbers. Nor Perth, Australia. Nor London, which has always famously been colour-coded, but which gives its lines names that have absolutely no bearing on streets above: the Victoria Line, the Northern Line, the Circle Line, and so on.

Quote:
Colours are not the best as some people are colour-blind, and apparently numbers are more intuitive and easier to remember than long names like Eglinton or Danforth.
Colour-blindness is rare, only manifests itself in a small percentage of the population, and even then, sufferers still see colour--maybe not the way the designers intended, but they still see colour. And I say that as one who suffers from it.

Total colour-blindness--seeing the world in black-and-white--is so rare as to be negligible. Mostly, colour-blindness, or "dichromatism," to give it its fancy medical term, is limited to colour pairs: red-green and yellow-blue, are the most common. Those of us who "suffer" (in scary quotes because we aren't really suffering) from dichromatism may not see the same colours as you, but we still see colour, and can discern yellow from red, from green, from blue, and so on. If I couldn't do that, they would never have given me a driver's license. In other words, and in my case (red-green), neither red nor green are grey--they're just not as vivid as you might see. If I see the Bloor-Danforth line on Toronto subway maps as pale green--well, it's still green.

No snark intended, Acajack. There is a lot of misinformation and assumptions out there about colour-blindness. I hope that I have cleared up some misconceptions and assumptions.
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Old Yesterday, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,615 posts, read 31,157,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Not doubting you, but I don't see Chicago going to numbers. Nor Perth, Australia. Nor London, which has always famously been colour-coded, but which gives its lines names that have absolutely no bearing on streets above: the Victoria Line, the Northern Line, the Circle Line, and so on.

Colour-blindness is rare, only manifests itself in a small percentage of the population, and even then, sufferers still see colour--maybe not the way the designers intended, but they still see colour. And I say that as one who suffers from it.

Total colour-blindness--seeing the world in black-and-white--is so rare as to be negligible. Mostly, colour-blindness, or "dichromatism," to give it its fancy medical term, is limited to colour pairs: red-green and yellow-blue, are the most common. Those of us who "suffer" (in scary quotes because we aren't really suffering) from dichromatism may not see the same colours as you, but we still see colour, and can discern yellow from red, from green, from blue, and so on. If I couldn't do that, they would never have given me a driver's license. In other words, and in my case (red-green), neither red nor green are grey--they're just not as vivid as you might see. If I see the Bloor-Danforth line on Toronto subway maps as pale green--well, it's still green.

No snark intended, Acajack. There is a lot of misinformation and assumptions out there about colour-blindness. I hope that I have cleared up some misconceptions and assumptions.
Thanks for the info and no offence taken at all.

It's just that making things easier for the colour-blind is always cited as a reason when they add numbers to metro lines that were previously only identified with colours.

(In Montreal BTW I've never heard anyone refer to the lines by proper names, like the "Angrignon-Honoré-Beaugrand line".)
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Old Yesterday, 01:02 PM
 
Location: PVB
4,625 posts, read 2,671,952 times
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Getting back to the original post I would say NYC. I was born in NYC as was my mother, my dad was born in Toronto so I have spent much time in both cities. The similarities are live theatre, fantastic cuisine, rapid transit systems, dreadful traffic jams and sky scrapers everywhere. The differences are Torontonians are much nicer and more polite, Canada takes much better care of its citizens, Toronto is much much cleaner and safer. Hotels are more affordable as are restaurants. I love Toronto and have spend thousands of hours there enjoying it. I now live far away and visit infrequently. I haven't been to NYC in at least 13 years and I could care less if I ever went back, I would rather remember it the way it used to be. My son lives in Toronto and daughter in Ottawa so I will be back as soon as COVID lets up. Go Canada!!
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Old Today, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Toronto
2,102 posts, read 3,176,293 times
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I think that those who have said Toronto is its own city, with its own vibe, and is not easily compared to a single American city, have the right idea. You can take aspects of different American cities and stick them together to get some kind of approximation of the US version of Toronto, but the goal of this thread seems to be a comparison with a single American city that is the most like Toronto. Again, I don’t think there is a single American city that is much like Toronto.

I know this is an American board and people often try to understand something they don’t know much about by comparing it to what they do know. Canada and the US do share a common language and broadly similar politics, culture, and values. Our cities were born and grew at roughly the same time in history, experiencing many of the same immigration patterns and urban planning experiments. There has been a lot of cross-pollination of culture due to business, political, and community-level connections between the US and Canada. In that sense, I can understand why one might think Toronto has an American analogue. The thing is, it doesn’t because it has its own unique history just like every major American city.

When I used to visit New York City a lot, I would come back to my apartment in Toronto after a week or two there and would have to acclimate to Toronto over a few days because it is different in so many ways. Broadly speaking, New York City is probably the one US city that is MOST like Toronto, but that doesn’t mean the two are similar at ground level. Only in a broad sense, and even then, there are many important differences.

What I have learned from being a member of this forum for almost ten years is that many of the Americans who post about Toronto in this forum or city vs. city don’t know it very well and think of it in terms of its Central Business District and the immediate vicinity. Thinking this area to be representative of Toronto, they are largely underwhelmed because Central Business Districts are pretty similar in North America and are places where people mainly pass through or work in; not so much where they live and play. This area is not very emblematic of the rest of Toronto, which is mostly a collection of a few dozen low-rise urban neighborhoods with their own unique offerings and demographics. They often have one major retail strip, with the odd small business on some of the larger side streets, with most side streets containing a blend of tightly-packed semis, some SFHs, some low-rise apartment buildings, and all kinds of architectural styles. Oh, and also a beautiful tree canopy that shades residential streets during the summer.

The CBD, Yonge St., Queen West, Bloor St. and Yorkville, as well as a Harborfront, are largely tourist areas. Most Torontonians move to a neighborhood that suits their needs and personality and will spend most of their time in that neighborhood, opening and patronizing businesses there and giving each one a distinct character. When Torontonians do move around the city, it’s usually to other neighborhoods outside the CBD, to experience the unique offerings that those neighborhoods have to offer.

For example, when I lived around the Danforth, I spent most of my time on the Danforth, with occasional trips down to South Riverdale. If I wanted nightlife, I didn’t go to the Entertainment District; I would choose my destination based on what I was looking for. Every neighborhood, from Roncesvalles to Parkdale, to Dundas West, College St., the Annex, west Queen West, Trinity Bellwoods, Baldwin Village, and on and on are all unique and interesting in their own way. One great thing, that is usually not advisable in American cities, is that a tourist can get on a streetcar, get off somewhere that looks interesting, and just walk in any direction without ever worrying about stumbling into the “wrong” neighborhood. You can go anywhere in Toronto and feel safe so long as you pay attention to your surroundings and exercise some basic street smarts and common sense.

Anyways, I just wanted to reiterate that Toronto is its own city and comparing it to American cities is unlikely to provide any real insight into what Toronto is like. Also, if you do visit the city, talk to a local and ask them where to go. Plan your trip beforehand to get the most out of your time here. Most importantly, get out of the downtown and experience Toronto’s neighborhoods.
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