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Old 05-07-2015, 02:16 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,183 times
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Before you read my little rant below - keep in mind this little tid-bit of information - in the average temperature's charts of any weather sources - they only include the actual temperature - NOT - the temperature INCLUDING the humid x! By the way - it gets really humid here, I have a thermometer that reads humidity too - and I've seen it at literally 100% humidity once (over 90% several times)!

Let me tell you, it seems to me that either the people posting here about Toronto's summer climate are either people that have only travelled to Toronto, have only lived here for a few years - in other words only have seen a small amount of our summers, OR - maybe have lived here for a long time - AND - don't have good memories.

The information you posters before me have said is highly inaccurate - and, let me tell you, the memory possibility is very real, because I've had conversations with many friends (I have dozens) about weather, and whether the topic is on the winter or summer (Toronto gets extremes of both) - the coldest day I've ever seen here was -51 C (with wind shill), the hottest day I've seen here was 54 C (with humid x). Not just the hottest or coldest day, the order of summers (or winters) of the years - it astounds me how quickly people forget just a few years back! Man, I'm not trying to brag, I am smarter than most people, but don't mistake that for bragging, I do not by any means consider myself any better than anyone, even someone with an iq of 80, my intelligence alone makes me no better than anyone. But I have 1 memory from before I turned 1, I have about 10 memories from before I turned 4, and several between 5 and 7, and I remember every single day of my life after 8 years old, I'm 31 now. Some people tell me they don't remember anything before they were 8 or 10.

Anyway, I've been living in or around Toronto for most of my life. I lived in Toronto from '86 - '89, York Region between '89 - '94, lived in Toronto in '95 when my parents separated, went back to York Region from '96 - (mid) '99, but my Dad was living in Toronto during that time and I visited him frequently enough to remember Toronto weather at the time too. I've been living here since mid/late '99 to now without moving. Let me list the summers from my memory from '95 onward - and I can guarantee you, my memory is nearly flawless on this. Here I go:

'95 - one of the hottest summers I've ever seen, there was a day above 30 C in March! July was what some would call hellish - I'm not lying, August was very hot too
'96 - more mild
'97 - pretty scorching hot!
'98 - extremely hot the most of the summer
'99 - more mild'ish
2000 - pretty hot most of the summer
'01 - pretty hot most of the summer
'02 - more mild'ish
'03 - an extremely hot summer - the year of the great power out that swept much of the entire north east side of North America (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_blackout_of_2003) - which was caused by excessive use of AC - this wasn't just in the States - it was in Toronto - that summer was severe!
'04 - pretty hot
'05 - very cold - the coldest I've ever seen - it snowed in late July, and in August too!
'06 - more mild'ish
'07 - mostly pretty hot
'08 - very hot through most of the summer
'09 - more mild'ish
'10 - mostly pretty hot
'11 - extremely or very hot - the entire summer!
'12 - very hot through most of the summer
'13 - a cold summer - not as cold as '05 - but the 2nd coldest I've ever seen!
'14 - more mild
'15 - yet to be seen - but by the looks of - if it's above 30 C in early May (which it will be on Friday and Saturday the 8th and 9th) - it's very indicative of a scorching summer to come (this is always a tell-tale sign of a hot summer to come here...) - the farmer's almanac, and environment Canada also agree - this is to be a hotter than normal summer - which means a scorching summer for Toronto!

Look at my list - will you try to say it's impossible that I can accurately remember those several summers? Well, then disagree with me, but I speak out of experience, I've been living here for most of my life, so I can tell my memory deserves a say - especially because my memory is usually better than most peoples.

In my list - 12 of the 20 years (summer '15 hasn't actually happened yet) included hot in the description. 8 of those 12 indicated it was in some form a little bit excessively hot in one shape or another. 6 of the 20 included mild, while mild meant lower mild, and mild'ish meant higher mild - 4 of those 6 used the word mild'ish. 2 of the 20 included the word cold - they really were cold too - I wish they never happened - or repeat themselves, but I expect it to happen again in maybe 6 or 10 years from now.

I noticed some people were quoting averages - the problem with those is Toronto is a city of extremes, well normally we do have hot summers, but we also have the rare cold summer, and some milder summers, when you look at several decades of data, and create averages meshing the mild and rare cold summers together with the extreme hot ones that are more frequent - even though the hotter ones are the norm, the rare cold ones and reoccurring milder ones drop those averages down.

My memory isn't the only aspect of me that shows my intelligence. I'm good with math too. Let's just lay down 20 numbers, let's just say, for the fun of it, each of these numbers represents a theoretical temperature for July 26th of each of those years (the hottest day according to weather spark), and then let's see what the average will end up being - and keep in mind they don't record the temperatures WITH the humid x (so I put the theoretical normal temperature that the weather companies use to calculate averages - AS WELL AS - the humid x theoretical values - for the fun of it):

no humid x: with humid x:
37 47
25 28
32 39
33 40
28 32
31 36
30 34
27 30
35 45
32 38
17 18
26 30
30 35
33 39
28 31
31 35
35 46
30 36
19 22
24 26

This creates an average of 29.15 C (do the math yourself, you'll see the same number) - and weather spark said the average for that day is 27 (2 C off my number - but my number is an average from 20 years of data - there's is probably from 50 or more). Also, for the fun of it, let's compare that average of 29 C for pre-humid x numbers to their humid-x-added-ones - which is 34.35 - now that's more accurate - and still seems a bit low - that is when I remember the majority of our summers are hotter than average - but the majority of the minority are mild, and a tiny minority are cold - the mild and cold numbers are what're pushing those numbers down. The majority of our summers are scorching hot through most of it all, and our humidity is very high, a day that's 26 C without humidity can sometimes be 32 C with it. In the 12 year majority hot summers I listed - I guarantee you - no word of lie or exaggeration - there were at least (maybe at the VERY least in the lowest amount of such days of those 12 summers - I'd say maybe 25 such days (that were 30 - 45 C)) 35 (I'd say more like 34 to 45'ish (but nothing's written in stone, and 35 is probably a closer average for our hotter summers), I'd definitely break it down to a typical hot summer here has 2 to 4 days above 30 in May, 4 to 7 in June, 15 to 20 in July (with the rest of the 16 days in the month hovering just under 30 around 28 C), 10 to 14 in August, (with the rest of the 21 days in the month hovering just under 24-27 C), 3 to 5 in September (with quite a few days hovering close to 30 C - like 27-29 C)) days above 30 (some of the very hottest probably had about 47 or more days above 30).

I remember all these things - because I LOVE hot summers, DREAD the rare cold ones, and am not a big fan of the less frequent, but still prevalent milder ones.
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Old 05-07-2015, 05:03 PM
 
3 posts, read 7,597 times
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The Summer of 2004 was very cold, the summer of 2005 was very hot. I think your impeccable memory may have slipped up on this.

From Environment Canada:

At times during the summer, residents across Ontario and southern Quebec either enjoyed or endured bouts of torrid heat and insufferable humidity. Combined with a record number of smog days, it was easily one of the hottest, sweatiest and dirtiest summers ever. And what a contrast to 2004 when summer went missing - it was either too cool, too wet or too cloudy for the likes of most people. If 2004 was the year without summer, 2005 was the year summer wouldn't end.

The summer of summers began with the warmest June ever, and the record-breaking trend continued into July, August and beyond. For traditional hot spots such as Windsor and Toronto, June-to-August was the warmest on record. Of significance was the number of hot days (>30°C) in Toronto. Normally, the city gets approximately 14 hot days a year. In 2004 there were only 3 hot days, but in 2005 there were a whopping 41! Montreal was also well above its average of 8 hot days per year, logging in with 23 for 2005. In contrast, there were only 2 hot days in 2004. Back in Toronto, the city issued eight heat alerts and 18 extreme heat alerts for a total of 26 heat days. The previous record was 19 in 1991. If anything, the summer heat was uncommonly relentless with few breaks between each episode.

For many it was the oppressively high humidity that evoked most of the complaining and for good reason. At Toronto, the number of days with humidex values greater than an uncomfortable 35 reached 44, tying the record in 1955 and 2002. The summer also featured the longest-ever bout of jungle-like humidity lasting 13 consecutive days beginning on July 10. But while daytime sweats can be eased by swimming pools and workplace air conditioning, it was the high night-time minimum temperatures that often led to much tossing and turning. In Toronto, minimum temperatures were a sweltering four degrees warmer than normal. Further, there were 25 nights in which the minimum temperature did not drop below 20°C (i.e. tropical nights), breaking the previous record of 19 in 2002.
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Old 05-07-2015, 05:08 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,183 times
Reputation: 10
Default Correction to my above reply to this post

(if this forum allowed me to edit my post, I wouldn't be making this one, but I can't so I had to make this one) In the last moments of writing the above reply - I altered some of the information at the end of the second last paragraph- to make the data as accurate as possible - BUT - in doing so, I left a few spelling errors and number (of days) errors - it was around 4 am here, I was sleepy, and I just wanted to finish posting. This is how the end of that paragraph should've been written:

In the 12 year majority hot summers I listed - I guarantee you - no word of lie or exaggeration - there were at least (maybe at the VERY least in the lowest amount of such days of those 12 summers - I'd say maybe 25 such days (that were 30 - 45 C)) 35 (days) (I'd say more like 34 to 45'ish (days) (but nothing's written in stone, and 35 (days) is probably a closer average for our hotter summers), I'd definitely break it down to a typical hot summer here has 2 to 4 days above 30 C in May, 4 to 7 in June, 15 to 20 in July (with the rest of the days in the month hovering just under 30 C around 28 C), 10 to 14 in August, (with the rest of the days in the month hovering around 24-29 C), 3 to 5 in September (with quite a few (5-9) days hovering close to 30 C - like 27-29 C)) days above 30 C (some of the very hottest probably had about 47 or more days above 30 C).


.... AND - since I wrote this reply, I had to add - when I say days above 30 C - I mean including humid x - but it really does have a strong effect - and I'm being honest - the average hot summer does have 35 days above 30 C (as much as 47 days) - and the days above 40 C on an average hot summer - is probably about 7-13 days (maybe at the very lowest 3 days, and highest - 15 days)!
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Old 05-07-2015, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,705 posts, read 4,049,361 times
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From what I remember 2009 was pretty cold. I remember 2011 and 2012 were pretty hot because I swam in Lake Superior which is usually too cold for swimming.

I don't think 2013 was that cold though? I think the end of it was cold but the first half of the summer was quite hot, and I remember one night in Waterloo the temperature only dropped to 24-25C with many others that stayed in the low 20s.

Anyways, I've never lived with A/C, so I notice when it gets hot. Usually there's a few nights a year when I sleep in the basement where it's cooler, and maybe a dozen more when I wish I did.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:08 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 12,349,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
All of the Africans I know are from various countries in west Africa or from the Congo in central Africa. Places where the average maximum is around 30C.
People for some reason think Africa is all scorching. We went to Tanzania in the summer and for a few nights had the heater on. The same people probably think cities near the equator are the hottest when it is completely wrong.

Like I said Toronto summers are real summers but nowhere suffocatingly hot. It is on the mild side if all cities are considered. 33C with a humidex if 40 is nothing and we have only a few every year, sometimes none at all. Most summer days are comfy.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Toronto
642 posts, read 745,536 times
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It can get very hot and humid. It may not last all summer but when it happens it is very uncomfortable. I've been to Atlanta, New Orleans, and Washington DC in the middle of summer and they are no worse than a really hot day in Toronto.
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Old 05-08-2015, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Seattle-WA-USA
678 posts, read 735,214 times
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I went to Toronto in August and it was 72F(20C) and cloudy. At the same time it was about 106F(36C) in LA.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:41 PM
 
907 posts, read 916,579 times
Reputation: 602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coompa View Post
The Summer of 2004 was very cold, the summer of 2005 was very hot. I think your impeccable memory may have slipped up on this.

From Environment Canada:

At times during the summer, residents across Ontario and southern Quebec either enjoyed or endured bouts of torrid heat and insufferable humidity. Combined with a record number of smog days, it was easily one of the hottest, sweatiest and dirtiest summers ever. And what a contrast to 2004 when summer went missing - it was either too cool, too wet or too cloudy for the likes of most people. If 2004 was the year without summer, 2005 was the year summer wouldn't end.

The summer of summers began with the warmest June ever, and the record-breaking trend continued into July, August and beyond. For traditional hot spots such as Windsor and Toronto, June-to-August was the warmest on record. Of significance was the number of hot days (>30°C) in Toronto. Normally, the city gets approximately 14 hot days a year. In 2004 there were only 3 hot days, but in 2005 there were a whopping 41! Montreal was also well above its average of 8 hot days per year, logging in with 23 for 2005. In contrast, there were only 2 hot days in 2004. Back in Toronto, the city issued eight heat alerts and 18 extreme heat alerts for a total of 26 heat days. The previous record was 19 in 1991. If anything, the summer heat was uncommonly relentless with few breaks between each episode.

For many it was the oppressively high humidity that evoked most of the complaining and for good reason. At Toronto, the number of days with humidex values greater than an uncomfortable 35 reached 44, tying the record in 1955 and 2002. The summer also featured the longest-ever bout of jungle-like humidity lasting 13 consecutive days beginning on July 10. But while daytime sweats can be eased by swimming pools and workplace air conditioning, it was the high night-time minimum temperatures that often led to much tossing and turning. In Toronto, minimum temperatures were a sweltering four degrees warmer than normal. Further, there were 25 nights in which the minimum temperature did not drop below 20°C (i.e. tropical nights), breaking the previous record of 19 in 2002.
Yeah I checked the weather history for 2004 on weather underground and it indeed seemed very cold. 2005 seemed hot.

And snow in July and August? I don't think that's possible in that part of Canada... Even Alberta never got snow in July but only a few times in June and August.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:45 PM
 
907 posts, read 916,579 times
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Toronto is super hot and humid in the summer. It is one of the hottest spots in Canada when you factor in the humidity.
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Old 05-09-2015, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
14,961 posts, read 10,515,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post
I went to Toronto in August and it was 72F(20C) and cloudy. At the same time it was about 106F(36C) in LA.
36C is 96F not 106F .
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