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Old 06-09-2015, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 548,722 times
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What about Vaughan then?
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,692 posts, read 31,404,358 times
Reputation: 10104
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_jordania View Post
Respectfully, I'm pretty sure that the Italian, Hispanic, Greek, and Portuguese populations are larger in number in Toronto. North African, Lebanese, etc, could be larger in Montreal, but most likely on a per-ethnicity basis. For example, there are more Lebanese in Quebec, but more "Arabs" in general in Ontario.

Re: Latin Americans in Canada, Ontario wins out: The Latin American Community in Canada


Re: Arab populations, Ontario wins out by a mere fraction: The Arab Community in Canada
Two things.

I wasn't saying there were more people of Italian origin in Montreal. I know there are more of all four first groups in Toronto. The stat I had was language spoken at home. Which may or may not be higher in Montreal. We never got a definitive number. But language use is not the same as total number of people of X origin.

And I also wasn't saying that there were more Latin Americans, Lebanese or even Arabs in Montreal. Only that their impact on the character of the city (true of Italians too) seems higher than in Toronto. Because Montreal doesn't have as wide a diversity of immigrant groups as Toronto.

My post makes that clear.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Canada
2,601 posts, read 1,389,823 times
Reputation: 5420
A lot in terms of festivals and food. Not so much in terms of people anymore.
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Old 09-17-2015, 12:30 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 3,151,495 times
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Don't expect to find many on College St.! That was the city's Little Italy from the 1920s to the 1960s, they left the area long ago. The Dufferin-St. Clair area has a good number of Italians (and Italian is commonly spoken) but the population is shrinking there.

Like in the Northeast US, an Italian Canadian identity exists and many live in ethnic enclaves (such as in Downsview and the suburb of Vaughan). But they're mostly populated by the children and grandchildren of immigrants. They're well integrated, but not fully "melted". The last wave of Italian immigration occurred between 1950 and 1970, so the Italian immigrant population is quite old. So there's still lots of Italian-speaking seniors around, but virtually no Italian kids who have to enroll in ESL programs in school.

Chinese and South Asians are more visible because the majority of them are foreign born, and came to Canada within the last two decades.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 09-17-2015 at 01:17 PM..
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Old 09-17-2015, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Toronto
6,751 posts, read 4,533,280 times
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Default Downsview Italian Population

Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Don't expect to find many on College St.! That was the city's Little Italy from the 1920s to the 1960s, they left the area long ago. The Dufferin-St. Clair area has a good number of Italians (and Italian is commonly spoken) but the population is shrinking there.

Like in the Northeast US, an Italian Canadian identity exists and many live in ethnic enclaves (such as in Downsview and the suburb of Vaughan). But they're mostly populated by the children and grandchildren of immigrants. They're well integrated, but not fully "melted". The last wave of Italian immigration occurred between 1950 and 1970, so the Italian immigrant population is quite old. So there's still lots of Italian-speaking seniors around, but virtually no Italian kids who have to enroll in ESL programs in school.

Chinese and South Asians are more visible because the majority of them are foreign born, and came to Canada within the last two decades.
In the 80s and 90s there were much more Italian people living in Downsview, but many migrated to north of Steeles (Maple and Woodbridge). Many (but not all) of the Italian businesses moved with them. You could actually get Italain Breads and Soda delivered to your home on a regular basis. In the area I grew up in the Galati Bros grocery store is now an Asian grocery stores. The local Italian owned pizza stores is now a West Indian Take out restaurant. Nona and nono may still live there, but the next generation split a long time ago. Even in the 80s I did not know any Italian kids in school that were in ESL. The kids in ESL were usually from Latian America, Poland or the Middle East. All of the Italian kids were like second generation and a few had 1 or their 2 parent that were born in Italy. Most of their grandparents either did not speak English or spoke English with a very strong Italian accent. This is the cool thing about Toronto .. with every group of immigrants you get a fun burst of excitement. It keeps it interesting.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:08 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 3,151,495 times
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Downsview is certainly a lot less Italian than it was 20 years ago, and as you say, it's skewed toward the older side. Still there's some 30%+ Italian census tracts in the area.
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Old 04-12-2021, 07:33 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 417,521 times
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Is Italian influence the reason Madame Plante uses her hands while speaking?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubesfmkFpoQ
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Old 04-13-2021, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,692 posts, read 31,404,358 times
Reputation: 10104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
Is Italian influence the reason Madame Plante uses her hands while speaking?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubesfmkFpoQ
The French do that too so it's probably more that it's a trait of theirs that Canadian francophones have retained.
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Old 04-13-2021, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,825 posts, read 9,320,867 times
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It's kind of in the ether in Montreal. I talk with my hands alot and don't have any Latin roots at all.
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Old 04-13-2021, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Canada
6,791 posts, read 5,986,361 times
Reputation: 4700
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
GTA has a lot large fat Greek mobsters too. I wonder what position he played in hockey. Probably goalie so he dont have to skate much.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifKgli-9Z4U

What a way with words, very diplomatic. lol


Here is some more diplomacy from Montreal...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAWkVk0SZuE
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