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Old 04-14-2021, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,691 posts, read 31,396,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
What a way with words, very diplomatic. lol


Here is some more diplomacy from Montreal...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAWkVk0SZuE
His accent sounds very familiar to that of many francophones when they speak English.
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Old Today, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,729 posts, read 2,171,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
Many of my Italian relatives immigrated to Toronto from 1895 to 1912, and lived on Dundas, Clinton, Bellwoods, or Manning Ave.
Clinton Street! Home of one of the best pizzerias in Toronto--Bitondo's. Best pizza in all of the GTA, and the panzerotti--holy hannah, they are worth the clogged arteries. I've been to Bitondo's on Clinton Street many times, and it is worth a visit. Thanks for reminding me about Clinton Street and Bitondo's!
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Old Today, 06:13 AM
 
51 posts, read 8,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Clinton Street! Home of one of the best pizzerias in Toronto--Bitondo's. Best pizza in all of the GTA, and the panzerotti--holy hannah, they are worth the clogged arteries. I've been to Bitondo's on Clinton Street many times, and it is worth a visit. Thanks for reminding me about Clinton Street and Bitondo's!
I was born in Toronto, grew up in Philadelphia, and lived most of my life in Los Angeles. All 3 of "my" cities have great pizza. Still have fond memories as a kid of attending Leafs games at Maple Leaf Gardens on Carlton, in the 1960's. My uncle had 2 season tickets, and he would give them to my brother, and me when we were visiting Toronto. Most of the fans had suits on, and my brother and I were probably the youngest people there. Sporting events were not the family type of events they are today. I am probably related to half of the Italians buried at Mount Hope Cemetery. Hate cold weather, but love Toronto!
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Old Today, 12:58 PM
 
51 posts, read 8,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoGeeks View Post
When did most of the Italians in Toronto arrive? Like when they went to America? Or a bit later, like post WWII?

Here a lot of Italians still strongly identify as Italian, even if many don't speak much or any Italian. You'll hear some talk about 'wogs and Aussies/skips'. I can't imagine Italian Americans talking about 'Italians' as opposed to 'Americans'. I mean Italian Australians still consider themselves Australian, of course, but many will make a big deal about how Italian they are. Whereas Anglo-Celtic Australians with English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish ancestry often say they're 'just Australian.' Whereas other groups are hyphenated Australians. In the US I feel immigrants integrate more (not that a lot don't here, but it feels more international). I think the fact Australia is 24% born overseas, Canada 17% and the US 12% has something to do with this discrepancy.
My Italian family arrived in Toronto from 1895 until 1912. In fact my grandmother on my mother's side was born in Toronto in a house on Division Street, which is no longer there. The street later became part of the University of Toronto. There was a second and third wave of Italian immigrants that came after WW1 and WW2. Basically this first and second wave of Italians are immersed into Canadian culture, and a lot of them today wouldn't even look like, the stereotypical Southern Italian look. I am 70 yrs old, 100% Southern Italian, and do not speak Italian. There are 500k people of Italian descent in Greater Toronto, far more than there was ever in Montreal. My father graduated from The University of Toronto in 1952, worked for Canada Packers awhile, and then we moved to Philadelphia for a better job opportunity. Now Italians in Philly were a lot more boisterous about being Italian. Sort of like comparing the laid back fans at Maple Leaf Gardens in the 1970's, to the absolute crazy fans at the old Philly Spectrum! I live in LA now, still consider my 3 cities as Toronto, Philly, and Los Angeles.
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