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Old 06-14-2021, 10:16 PM
 
82 posts, read 11,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
I am stating the actual written law, weather Australia would have been welcoming to mass migration form Italy in the period is irrelevant, as their was never enough demand to make it an issue in the first place.

Now IF we had as much immigration as the US did during that time, it may have become an issue in Australia like it did in the USA, however it did not, and it was never an issue.

It was 15 years between 1924 and the start of WW2, and Australia suffered badly from the great depression as as well. So in a space of say 12 years where migration may have been able to happen, how may Italians do you think may have looked at what was then an very insignificant and virtually unknown country on the other side of the world?
I agree with you that there are other factors in why people immigrate. I would like you to agree with me that the USA and Canada had a little different mindset than Australia on what it wanted to be. The USA a melting pot, and Canada with its large French population, not quite as connected to the UK as Australia. I mean Canada hates cricket just as much as America. I think Australia wanted to be an extension of the UK, and therefore was late to the immigration game.
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Old 06-14-2021, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,119 posts, read 6,127,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
I agree with you that there are other factors in why people immigrate. I would like you to agree with me that the USA and Canada had a little different mindset than Australia on what it wanted to be. The USA a melting pot, and Canada with its large French population, not quite as connected to the UK as Australia. I mean Canada hates cricket just as much as America. I think Australia wanted to be an extension of the UK, and therefore was late to the immigration game.
I would agree on all those points, Australia is a far newer country, we did not have any wars of independence, and Europe (Outside the UK and France ) as a a colonizer was pretty much gone at the time Australia was first settled by the British. The French under Napoleon apparently had a go at Australia, however the battle of Trafalgar which pretty much destroyed the French navy, saw an end to that.

I just do not like misinformation regarding immigration to Australia, it was pretty much a free for all from Europe for most of our history as a nation, however as Australia "grew up" during an Age where the UK was at its most dominate and at the height of its wealth, Australia (and New Zealand I might add) became far more British than most. Obviously things like WW1, WW2 and the great depression fuel a large degree of anti-immigration sentiment, however Australia is hardly unique in that regards.
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Old 06-14-2021, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Australia
2,241 posts, read 997,505 times
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We were told that after WW2, southern Italians who had trade qualifications would go to Nth America. The unskilled, like my in-laws, came to Australia. Many of them never expected to see Italy again, because of the cost of travelling that distance as well as the time involved. My FIL only ever returned once in fifty years.

As an aside that situation has resulted, rightly or wrongly, in some of us being less tolerant to those who are upset at our borders still being closed. Until about twenty years ago few people expected to travel to Europe to attend funerals and other family events. Especially not for destination weddings. My FIL received the news of the deaths of his parents by mail, three months after the event.
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Old 06-15-2021, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
I mean Canada hates cricket just as much as America.
In fairness, I don't think Canada hates cricket. It's just not a part of Canada's sporting culture. When you live beside the much-bigger, population-wise, United States, things are going to rub off. So while ice hockey is something we taught the Americans, they taught us baseball and football. It is true that Canadian football has a few different rules than American football, though the skills are interchangeable; but baseball as played in Canada is the same as in the US. Soccer and basketball are catching on, but they have a ways to go before they find the minor league/college development systems that hockey, football, and baseball have, in both Canada and the US.

However unlike all those, cricket in Canada is completely off the radar. It's hard to hate it when most Canadians aren't even aware of its existence. Those that are aware of it, tend to look at it as a game played by Indians (from India), Pakistanis, and people from once-British Caribbean islands. I'm sure there are exceptions, but to say that "Canada hates cricket," is inaccurate, I'd suggest. Rather, it might be more accurate to state, "Canada ignores cricket."
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Old 06-15-2021, 07:43 AM
 
82 posts, read 11,510 times
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Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
In fairness, I don't think Canada hates cricket. It's just not a part of Canada's sporting culture. When you live beside the much-bigger, population-wise, United States, things are going to rub off. So while ice hockey is something we taught the Americans, they taught us baseball and football. It is true that Canadian football has a few different rules than American football, though the skills are interchangeable; but baseball as played in Canada is the same as in the US. Soccer and basketball are catching on, but they have a ways to go before they find the minor league/college development systems that hockey, football, and baseball have, in both Canada and the US.

However unlike all those, cricket in Canada is completely off the radar. It's hard to hate it when most Canadians aren't even aware of its existence. Those that are aware of it, tend to look at it as a game played by Indians (from India), Pakistanis, and people from once-British Caribbean islands. I'm sure there are exceptions, but to say that "Canada hates cricket," is inaccurate, I'd suggest. Rather, it might be more accurate to state, "Canada ignores cricket."
You forgot to mention that basketball was invented at McGill University in Montreal, and the first NBA game was played at Maple Leaf Gardens. You are so wrong about the college development systems of baseball and basketball. College basketball is far bigger in the US, than college baseball. March Madness is almost as big as the Super Bowl. I am more of an MLB fan, than NBA fan. Also you are comparing the popularity of soccer in Canada to basketball? When the Raptors won the NBA title, millions came out to party on the streets of Toronto. When Toronto FC won the MLS title, the parade was tiny by comparison. Isn't it ironic that a Canadian based team hasn't won the Stanley Cup since 1993, and after the powerful Vegas Golden Knights make short work of the Montreal Canadiens, you can add another year! This Canadian/American hates cricket, and I guarantee you, if you could force Canadians to watch it, they would all hate it. Cricket could never match the incredible electricity of a baseball playoff game at Rogers Centre (SkyDome), Fenway Park, Yankee Stadium, Wrigley Field or Dodger Stadium. If you followed the Blue Jays in the playoffs a few years ago, you will agree baseball creates awesome tension.
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Old 06-15-2021, 09:22 AM
 
82 posts, read 11,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
We were told that after WW2, southern Italians who had trade qualifications would go to Nth America. The unskilled, like my in-laws, came to Australia. Many of them never expected to see Italy again, because of the cost of travelling that distance as well as the time involved. My FIL only ever returned once in fifty years.

As an aside that situation has resulted, rightly or wrongly, in some of us being less tolerant to those who are upset at our borders still being closed. Until about twenty years ago few people expected to travel to Europe to attend funerals and other family events. Especially not for destination weddings. My FIL received the news of the deaths of his parents by mail, three months after the event.
You are correct, almost none of my Toronto ancestors since 1895, ever stepped foot in Italy again. The only one was my mother's father who built several successful Toronto businesses, and was wealthy. My mothers family didn't live with the other Italians downtown, because my grandfather built a large house up in Thornhill. He was sort of a selfish guy, in that he would galavant around London, Paris, and of course Italy. He never took his wife (my grandmother) or any of his kids, on several trips he made. Those several trips to Italy is what got him in trouble with the Canadian Government during WW2. So he was placed in a concentration camp they had for certain Germans and Italians. Even though he was a subject of the Crown, a Canadian citizen, they said he was sympathetic to Mussolini. At the same time his 2 sons (my uncles) were serving with honors in the Canadian military. He was released after only 9 months, only because a powerful friend of his (Canadian General) vouched for him. Most of these Germans and Italians stayed in for the duration of the war.
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Old 06-15-2021, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,700 posts, read 31,429,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
You forgot to mention that basketball was invented at McGill University in Montreal, .
Basketball was actually invented by James Naismith of Almonte, Ont. when he was teaching at a college in Springfield, Mass.

So it was developed by a Canadian in the U.S. where he has immigrated to.
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Old 06-15-2021, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,700 posts, read 31,429,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
This Canadian/American hates cricket, and I guarantee you, if you could force Canadians to watch it, they would all hate it. .
If I asked sports fans in my entourage about cricket, they wouldn't hate it any more than they hate pasapallo, bandy or netball.

As Chevy says, it's more that they don't really know it. They don't have any reason to "hate" it.
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Old 06-15-2021, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,700 posts, read 31,429,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
You are so wrong about the college development systems of baseball and basketball. College basketball is far bigger in the US, than college baseball. .
If you actually read what he said, he wasn't saying that college baseball in the US has a popularity that's equivalent to college basketball. Any sports fan knows that that's not true.

What he said was that soccer and basketball don't have high-performance well-honed development systems in Canada.

Which is absolutely true.
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Old 06-15-2021, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,700 posts, read 31,429,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
Cricket could never match the incredible electricity of a baseball playoff game at Rogers Centre (SkyDome), Fenway Park, Yankee Stadium, Wrigley Field or Dodger Stadium. If you followed the Blue Jays in the playoffs a few years ago, you will agree baseball creates awesome tension.
I grew up watching baseball so I'd prefer that sport for sure, but when people say things like this it's more a reflection of their upbringing and resulting preferences than anything fundamental about the sport.

Cricket fans can deride baseball with the best of them, I assure you.

As another example, I am not that big a curling watcher but geez a curling match is way more compelling and dynamic than watching golf.

And yet how many people are golf fans compared to curling fans?
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