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Old 09-27-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,762 posts, read 3,701,826 times
Reputation: 7800

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Toronto Life magazine has just released their 2015 Toronto neighbourhood survey.

It covers all 140 of them, rated on a number of factors. Schools, recreation facilities , transit routes, police crime reports, educational levels of residents, income levels, shopping , and eating choices.

Not surprisingly, the best Toronto neighbourhood is The Bridal Path, while the very worst is Rouge Hills.

Take a look and see where your part of the city rates. Take the time to read the whole thing, it has a lot of insightful information about why certain places are on the rise, while others are dropping in home values. I was pleasantly surprised to find that my area has had a year over year increase of home sale prices of eleven percent, and since 2011, my home has increased in value by a dollar figure of 178,000.

link here. The ultimate Toronto neighbourhood rankings | Toronto Life#

Some random observations.........The Annex, which has had a long standing reputation as a safe and nice place to live, has a horrible crime problem, compared to the area just to the east of it, the Casa Loma district. Not surprisingly, the Church Wellesley corridor has the fewest children of any place in Toronto.

The highest percentage of renters are found in Regent park, Thorncliffe park, and Mount Dennis. The area with the lowest average levels of education are Black Creek and Jane Finch .

The condoland area, south of the Gardiner, along Queens Quay has a high crime rate. One of the lowest rates for all types of crime is central Etobicoke's 22 Division .

This is one of the must read articles of this year, for Torontonians, and those who don't live here, but are interested in the city's life. The methods used are explained in the article's preamble.

Your comments are welcome.

Jim B.
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Old 09-27-2015, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Toronto
6,754 posts, read 4,376,211 times
Reputation: 4619
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Toronto Life magazine has just released their 2015 Toronto neighbourhood survey.



It covers all 140 of them, rated on a number of factors. Schools, recreation facilities , transit routes, police crime reports, educational levels of residents, income levels, shopping , and eating choices.



Not surprisingly, the best Toronto neighbourhood is The Bridal Path, while the very worst is Rouge Hills.



Take a look and see where your part of the city rates. Take the time to read the whole thing, it has a lot of insightful information about why certain places are on the rise, while others are dropping in home values. I was pleasantly surprised to find that my area has had a year over year increase of home sale prices of eleven percent, and since 2011, my home has increased in value by a dollar figure of 178,000.



link here. The ultimate Toronto neighbourhood rankings | Toronto Life#



Some random observations.........The Annex, which has had a long standing reputation as a safe and nice place to live, has a horrible crime problem, compared to the area just to the east of it, the Casa Loma district. Not surprisingly, the Church Wellesley corridor has the fewest children of any place in Toronto.



The highest percentage of renters are found in Regent park, Thorncliffe park, and Mount Dennis. The area with the lowest average levels of education are Black Creek and Jane Finch .



The condoland area, south of the Gardiner, along Queens Quay has a high crime rate. One of the lowest rates for all types of crime is central Etobicoke's 22 Division .



This is one of the must read articles of this year, for Torontonians, and those who don't live here, but are interested in the city's life. The methods used are explained in the article's preamble.



Your comments are welcome.



Jim B.


Read the article, but did not actually find it too meaningful. I do not think I would really use this to help determine where in the city I would want to live. For example I would never want to spend $300 000 to 500 000 more on a property to live around some of the areas that rank higher on the list to live in a smaller space when I could live in some of the areas that are literally a 20-30 minute communte away and get more bang for my buck. Regarding crime in Toronto, I have spent a lot of time in some of the worst areas and in some of the better areas ... and never had anything significant happen to me so I am not really getting holding that particular factor too high when choosing a location to live in Toronto. Regardless an interesting read.
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Old 09-27-2015, 04:07 PM
 
494 posts, read 1,120,674 times
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First of all, Yonge-Eglinton was ranked number one. Rouge (there is no neighborhood named Rouge Hills on the list) was not "the very worst", Westminster-Branson was ranked last. The Bridle Path was actually ranked number 72, just behind Regent park (71) , 9 points behind Rexdale-Kipling (which was ranked 63), and 53 points behind Thistletown-Beaumonde Heights which is a part of Rexdale.

Their metrics are seriously flawed. For example, they don't include subways or Go transit stops for the transit score and use voter turnout to calculate the "community" score.

For anyone moving to Toronto and looking for a place to live, take this article with a grain a salt.
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Old 09-27-2015, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Toronto
642 posts, read 745,692 times
Reputation: 501
24. 1 is right down the street.
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Old 09-27-2015, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Toronto
6,754 posts, read 4,376,211 times
Reputation: 4619
Default Agreed

Quote:
Originally Posted by Average Fruit View Post
First of all, Yonge-Eglinton was ranked number one. Rouge (there is no neighborhood named Rouge Hills on the list) was not "the very worst", Westminster-Branson was ranked last. The Bridle Path was actually ranked number 72, just behind Regent park (71) , 9 points behind Rexdale-Kipling (which was ranked 63), and 53 points behind Thistletown-Beaumonde Heights which is a part of Rexdale.

Their metrics are seriously flawed. For example, they don't include subways or Go transit stops for the transit score and use voter turnout to calculate the "community" score.

For anyone moving to Toronto and looking for a place to live, take this article with a grain a salt.
I did not get the metrics either. According to the matrix I live in an area ranking fairly low, yet every house up for sale sells above asking price in days and my property value has almost doubled in the last 5 years. The population density is low. Good ttc and go access. Best green space in the city and a beach and marina. As long as articles like this justify keeping my property tax from going up keep them coming. No idea how there is such a big difference between where I live then five minutes away? The areas are like 65 spots different from each other Really strange.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,893 posts, read 12,330,236 times
Reputation: 3942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Average Fruit View Post
First of all, Yonge-Eglinton was ranked number one. Rouge (there is no neighborhood named Rouge Hills on the list) was not "the very worst", Westminster-Branson was ranked last. The Bridle Path was actually ranked number 72, just behind Regent park (71) , 9 points behind Rexdale-Kipling (which was ranked 63), and 53 points behind Thistletown-Beaumonde Heights which is a part of Rexdale.

Their metrics are seriously flawed. For example, they don't include subways or Go transit stops for the transit score and use voter turnout to calculate the "community" score.

For anyone moving to Toronto and looking for a place to live, take this article with a grain a salt.
Agreed! I mean the Annex a high crime area - how threatening a place that is - you might burn your tongue sipping on a latte at Snakes and Lattes
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Old 09-28-2015, 11:04 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 12,351,103 times
Reputation: 7742
These kind of rankings are bound to be controversial because people have vastly different preferences.

For example, you can't pay me to live in Lawrence Park North. The idea of living anywhere in North Toronto and looking at those houses and trees makes me shudder.
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Old 09-28-2015, 11:47 AM
 
1,218 posts, read 2,284,153 times
Reputation: 1343
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
These kind of rankings are bound to be controversial because people have vastly different preferences.

For example, you can't pay me to live in Lawrence Park North. The idea of living anywhere in North Toronto and looking at those houses and trees makes me shudder.
Hey, don't be dissing my hood! I would shudder living at Yonge and Dundas (I think you are there) as well for many reasons. But as I've mentioned to you before, have a kid and your preferences just might change, and what it has to offer may not seem so bad.

But I agree, this ranking seems more focused on a middle aged person's perspective if anything.
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Old 09-29-2015, 08:01 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,797 times
Reputation: 10
Dammit! #68, all of my neighbors are ranked higher. Although I'm sure it is somewhat related to the amount of social housing in the area, as the housing score is super low.

Not sure I'd agree that the waterfront communities has a stronger community and is more diverse than Kensington-Chinatown.

I kind of wish the report was not based on the city's ward's (I think thats what these are?), but based on more specific neighbourhoods. Its almost too large of an area in some of the DT spots, where a couple of blocks can make a big difference in vibe.
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