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Old 03-11-2008, 03:33 AM
 
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never been to such a cold place like this, but I will eventually move to Toronto this year. Could anyone advise what kind of winter clothes to bring? It sounds silly but I have no idea. Like many layers or a sweater and a down jacket/warm coat will be enough?

I am from a place there is usually no indoor heating at home, but winter could hit below zero. So people wear long johns in winter when they have to. Are these necessary in Toronto? By the way, chances are that I won't buy a car for some time, so I may spend some time walking outdoor instead of always from cars to indoor places.

Thanks!
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Old 03-11-2008, 11:23 PM
 
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Depending on where in Toronto you finally set up housekeeping, yu may be very close to a subway station for your transportation needs, or you may be on a bus route and spend time waiting at the bus stop. This could well determine what is appropriate outdoor wear.

It also depends on what the weather of the moment is and what you'll be doing.

Boots would be a good idea, long johns are a maybe, and a decent down coat will get you through anything Toronto has to offer.

Personally, I'd be inclined to bring very little and buy as I needed once there.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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I second that. Expect to buy most of your clothes here, unless of course you plan on arriving in the middle of winter; the selection in the stores will be limited.

Many people need gloves, all day long when we have highs of -5 C (24 F) or lower.
A lot of people will where gloves when it's near freezing.
You WILL need gloves when it approaches 0 F. (-18 F)

*Actually, mitts are recommended over gloves, but generally mitts are probably not needed over gloves above 0 F (-18 F) if you're spending up to an hour outside, unless your fingers are sensitive to cold like mine.

Look for "Thinsulate," "Micro-fibre" etc. insulation. Clothing made with these fancy materials are usually noticeably a lot warmer than traditional materials.

*Even Thinsulate winter hats are a lot better than regular winter hats; I just discovered this a year or two ago.

Winter Coat:

If you could only have one winter coat, you'll want to have one with a waterproof or water-repellent outer-layer. Our winters are generally a damp cold, and snow can easily switch over to freezing rain, or regular rain without warning.

During "ordinary" Toronto winter-weather, you should not need to put much extra clothes on to be comfortable outside. Wearing a winter coat, a hat and gloves will be more than adequate if the winds are light and the temperatures are seasonal; basically -10 C (15 F) or milder.

Winter boots are only an advantage if you need to walk in ankle deep or deeper snow, or your toes are getting cold easily. (like mine do) That being said, it'll probably be worth it to own a pair just in case.
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:16 AM
 
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I'd make sure I had a 'light' coat and a 'heavier' coat myself. And sometimes, it can be a nice winter day and a thick fleece sweater and a well-insulated vest works. I'd also get my coats with hats - I tend to need my head warm in order to stay warm. Today our feet got terribly soaked from stretches of badly-cleared sidewalks with patches of deep water alternating with snow & ice. Our regular shoes and runners didn't cut it today. However, everyone is individual and I have friends who are perpetually cold and wear a lot of layers. Your first year will probably get you acquainted well enough and buying as you go will help to fill out your needs. But mostly everyone I know from most provinces ends up owning several types of outerwear.
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Old 03-17-2008, 05:42 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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touque (hat), gloves, jacket, coat (there is a difference), long johns, windbreaker, boots, scarf.
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Old 03-17-2008, 05:04 PM
 
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wear stuff you can shed. i visited for the month of february and currently live in the carolinas. i thought i would be shocked by the cold, but not really. i wore a sweater, gloves, and a leather jacket one day while out for a walk downtown. i walked about 10 blocks and was unbuttoning my jacket on the way back. but the weirdest thing i noticed was how hot the buildings and apartments were kept. they must have cheap energy bills. i literally wore shorts and t-shirts around the condo i stayed at. and i could not wait to shed my coat whenever indoors (stores, restaurants, etc)
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Old 03-17-2008, 09:08 PM
 
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That's I what I worry about. The big difference between indoor and outdoor. I guess we need to put on some light clothes inside but a huge overcoat so that it is easy to take off whenever we need to. Just imagin if you wear warm longjohns to walk outdoors but suddent have to step into a 25 C building! That will be awkward.
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Old 03-17-2008, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Personally I never wear longjohns. If I want my legs warm I wear sweat pants under whatever pants I want to really wear (EG my work pants) that way when I arrive I can change (take off my sweat pants) without any big deal. I also wear a heavy sweater, and a coat. When needed (EG on the bus) I can unzip my coat.
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Old 03-23-2008, 10:47 AM
 
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Smile Warm clothes and lots of it !!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanusc View Post
never been to such a cold place like this, but I will eventually move to Toronto this year. Could anyone advise what kind of winter clothes to bring? It sounds silly but I have no idea. Like many layers or a sweater and a down jacket/warm coat will be enough?

I am from a place there is usually no indoor heating at home, but winter could hit below zero. So people wear long johns in winter when they have to. Are these necessary in Toronto? By the way, chances are that I won't buy a car for some time, so I may spend some time walking outdoor instead of always from cars to indoor places.

Thanks!
Living in Toronto during the winter months is really cold. You should have a warm long lengthed coat with a hood that has a cord to tighten for windy days, you should have a warm wool hat, set of insulated mits or gloves (I recommend a brand known as hotpaws), a long and warm tightly knit scarf, a set of boots with high legs and really good treads, so they grip when you walk in icy conditions. Wear warm clothing underneath, as the colder winds can chill you right through to the bone.
Homes in Toronto would usually be heated using natural gas,oil, or electric baseboard heating, so you would be wise to have a set of warm slippers and a nice and cozy sweater or polar fleece jacket too. This winter in Toronto was a really tough one, lots of snow, strong winds and icy conditions. The main thing to watch for in Toronto is the "windchill factor" on really cold days. As long as you bundle up and keep dry , covering your hands, head and face you will not get frostbite. hope this info helps you. lorri
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Old 03-23-2008, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 25,193,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evanusc View Post
That's I what I worry about. The big difference between indoor and outdoor. I guess we need to put on some light clothes inside but a huge overcoat so that it is easy to take off whenever we need to. Just imagin if you wear warm longjohns to walk outdoors but suddent have to step into a 25 C building! That will be awkward.
It's unusual for a building to be heated as high as 25 C. (equalivalent to 77 F)

However, we are not like the southern U.S., no place will be heated to just 62-65 F.
90-95% of all places indoors seem to be heated somwhere between 70-73 F.

Sometimes I can feel slightly overheated wearing a warm sweater, but it's no big deal.
It's not like you'll stick to your long sleeves, unless you're doing moderate to heavy excersize.

If you tend to feel cold, no sweater will be too thick.
If you tend to feel hot, lighter weight long-sleeved shirts would still probably comfortable indoors.

*When you come indoors, you can take off your coat. (and most other winter clothing)
It's generally as simple as that to not feel hot when you come inside.
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