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Old 02-09-2021, 04:15 PM
 
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Anyone here have any info on moving to Toronto region with two school going children from Ireland.
I will have a Bachelor of Education Degree, and wondered is there much demand for primary/elementary school teachers around that region?
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Old 02-09-2021, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Lots of demand for sure.

The real issue is having an Ontario teaching certification. Which shouldn't be too big a problem to get, but you do have to jump through that hoop before you can get a teaching job.
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Old 02-09-2021, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
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OP, have you checked on Canada's IMMIGRATION POLICIES?

Last year you wanted to move to Massachusetts and seemed to just assume that you could fly to the U.S. and find a job. But of course immigration doesn't work that way.

Now you're asking the same thing about Canada. Maybe it will work (I hope for you that it does, since you seem to really want to leave Ireland), but please at least try to do some homework on IMMIGRATION POLICIES before asking about moving to an entirely different country.
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Old 02-10-2021, 05:28 AM
 
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Im not stupid, I know you cant just fly to the US and land in a job house etc, im trying to find information on the different areas its the whole reason I am asking on here. Those are the two places I am interested in. What I would like, is to chat with someone who has done this move previously, not people telling me to look at immigration polices. I know how that works on a points bases! I want info from people that have actually moved.

Thanks Acajack appreciate the info about the qualifications.
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Old 02-10-2021, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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If you have a recognized university degree in subjects that can be taught in school then I think it might only take 1 year in an Ontario university to get a teaching certification (a B.Ed. degree).
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Old 02-12-2021, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdc740 View Post
Anyone here have any info on moving to Toronto region with two school going children from Ireland.
I will have a Bachelor of Education Degree, and wondered is there much demand for primary/elementary school teachers around that region?
From someone in the field, unfortunately not. The reasons are varied and take some serious explaining that I’m not able to do at the moment. However, I can tell you that you will struggle to find a teaching position here that pays and offers stability. The school boards and some of the bigger private schools are the only places that offer decent pay and job security and they are not easy to penetrate. The school boards are the best venues for employment as a teacher, but there is an oversupply of teachers while demand is falling due to smaller family sizes compared with the past.

Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) has more employment potential, but you need a TESL diploma and OCELT designation, and the pay/benefits is garbage for a professional, with very little room for advancement or salary growth.

I wish I could tell you to come here and teach but I would be setting you up for major disappointment. The cost of living is so high and the readily available teaching jobs pay very little. You would be living a life at the edge of the poverty line, most likely. Getting a tenured position within the boards takes time - maybe years - and living off of supply gigs in the meanwhile. It’s a tough life that demoralizes even the most dedicated teachers.
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Old Today, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
If you have a recognized university degree in subjects that can be taught in school then I think it might only take 1 year in an Ontario university to get a teaching certification (a B.Ed. degree).
A B.Ed used to take a year to complete, but in 2016 it changed to a two-year degree and you now get an M.Ed. However, this MA is not what it seems. The reason the B.Ed changed to a two-year Masters of Education was primarily because teachers colleges in Canada were graduating too many teachers, with no possibility of them getting jobs in local school boards. The two-year M.Ed was meant to slow down the rate at which teachers graduated, produce fewer teachers, and deter prospective teachers from getting their degree.

At the same time, the M.Ed is not a real M.Ed. In the past, an M.Ed was something you needed to complete in order to become a principal or to work your way towards a Ph.d in Education and join a teachers college faculty. This new M.Ed does not give you the ability to become a school principal and is really just a less condensed version of the B.Ed that I completed.

The B.Ed was a gauntlet. At least, it was at OISE, which is U of T’s teacher’s college, and one of the best in the world. The senior (high-school) program was a brutal, 9-month endurance race consisting of year-long pedagogy courses in your two teachables, a year-long cohort class based on the kind of teaching you wanted to specialize in (ie., inner city schools, special education, working with English Language Learners, and so on,) education psychology, school and society courses, one or two electives like classroom management, optional courses if you wanted the opportunity to teach in the Catholic Board, 40 Praxis hours at an approved venue, a major independent scholarly project related to education, two month-long practicums at schools that reflected your cohort in order to practice your teachables, and an unpaid internship at the end of the program. For the B.Ed program, you would start in early September and finish in June. It was a challenging and exhausting program designed to weed out the posers and allow the cream to float to the top. I graduated with a 4.0 gpa, but it was probably the hardest thing I’ve done in my life.

What I described above was just the course requirements. Within those courses, one would learn how to teach their teachable subjects (pedagogy,) develop detailed lesson plans, unit plans, and learn how to use different methodologies depending on your teaching style and goals. Within one’s cohort, the majority of the work was reading scholarly work on the kind of education you wanted to specialize in and writing research papers that gave you the opportunity to engage with the scholarship in order to shape your approach to education. A lot of the cohort work was done in groups or pairs, presentations were frequent, and having the “right” politics meant a lot. There was no room to challenge or even question the status quo, and doing so could land you in serious trouble. I could tell you a story about how this almost ruined a student teacher, but it would be a major digression from the topic at hand. One brief anecdote is how the instructor of the cohort cut off a student in the middle of their presentation when they dared to posit that there were uniquely Canadian values, like the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, multiculturalism, and the embrace and celebration of difference. The instructor felt that this was deeply offensive, that the use of the pronoun “they” to refer to recent immigrants implied an unacceptable us vs. them dichotomy, and that any notion of Canada being exceptional in any way was prejudicial and unacceptable. It did not seem to matter to this instructor that the presenter was commenting on the scholarship they were assigned and giving examples of how that scholarship related to teaching in diverse Canadian communities.

Anyways, this is just another example of the challenges of teaching in Canada, and how easy it is to have one’s words misconstrued and distorted, which can really spell the end of one’s career before it even begins.

But back to the change from the one-year B.Ed degree to the two year M.Ed, the new program is mostly a way of stretching out the material so that students don’t have to complete such a condensed program. It doesn’t actually reflect what an MA is, and confers few of the benefits of an MA on its graduates. For the most part, it is a way for teacher’s colleges to collect double the tuition for what is essentially the same degree while slowing down the output of teachers into a market where few teaching jobs are available.

By and large, it has not worked. The M.Ed may confer bragging rights on the recipient, who can claim they have an MA, but the program itself is virtually the same and the job market has not improved much. Some teachers retired early in the pandemic when learning went online, but this was no solution to the thousands of trained teachers who could not find work in an Ontario school board.

As for me, I’ve had my B.Ed for almost a decade and teach LINC. I am waiting for more teachers to retire so that I don’t have to do years of supply teaching and LTO’s to even be considered for a tenured, union position. Still, the clock is ticking and I’m getting older. When the job opportunities do open up, my years of experience may not give me an edge of those teachers who are still wet behind the ears.

Again, I wish I could tell the OP that Southern Ontario and the GTA had a great job market for teachers, but it doesn’t. On top of that, the COL is insane and housing/rental prices are well beyond the means of a teacher who does not have a salary of $60,000 or more, not including benefits.
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