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Old 01-10-2021, 09:22 AM
 
20,901 posts, read 12,086,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raquel976 View Post
It might be stronger in size because it is a more populated country, but in terms of Quality of Life which is what matters for the average citizen, Canada is simply way ahead.

This comes from someone who has lived in both places.

QOL as measured by various org's and agencies "bounces" to and fro when compared between the two countries.

The "happy" quotient doesn't move around as much and Canada is usually ahead on that one.

But, what do these really mean when taken apart to the individuals living parallel lifestyles?
Are autoworkers in the U.S. less happy than autoworkers in Canada, farmers, nurses, etc., etc.?

Cities in Canada do not in my mind, do anything markedly different by way of endorsing cultural uniqueness than do American cities. Take Caribbana in Toronto and compare it to Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Dare I mention Brampton in comparison to Dearborn? Where's the markedly different approach and outcome to having those places quite naturally evolve to what they've now become.

Taken in isolation and considering actual measurable factors one-on-one, there would be any number of cities in either country that could teach something to the other.

We need to just look at the actual title of the thread and debate that point alone; otherwise we'll end up in the usual slanging match over the price of walnuts in Newmarket versus Poughkeepsie.
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Old 01-10-2021, 12:24 PM
 
13,684 posts, read 6,825,323 times
Reputation: 13188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raquel976 View Post
It might be stronger in size because it is a more populated country, but in terms of Quality of Life which is what matters for the average citizen, Canada is simply way ahead.

This comes from someone who has lived in both places.
As someone who has lived in both places for over 20 years each time, both countries have their merits, and a lot depends on your socioeconomic status and goals.

But your statement is simplistic.

For example, if Canada is a 9, and the US a 7 on some 1-10 scale, if someone lives in a place where it’s a 2, either country is perfectly fine. And the US is far more accessible.

If Canada starts to get boat people like Cubans entering the US or Indonesians (and others) entering Australia then we can directly compare.

The kind of illegals entering Canada have already either legally entered the US or have legally entered Canada and overstayed. You’re not getting anyone tunneling 3000 miles or crossing a desert with no money after a caravan journey to the US southern border.
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Old 01-10-2021, 12:36 PM
 
13,684 posts, read 6,825,323 times
Reputation: 13188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
QOL as measured by various org's and agencies "bounces" to and fro when compared between the two countries.

The "happy" quotient doesn't move around as much and Canada is usually ahead on that one.

But, what do these really mean when taken apart to the individuals living parallel lifestyles?
Are autoworkers in the U.S. less happy than autoworkers in Canada, farmers, nurses, etc., etc.?

Cities in Canada do not in my mind, do anything markedly different by way of endorsing cultural uniqueness than do American cities. Take Caribbana in Toronto and compare it to Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Dare I mention Brampton in comparison to Dearborn? Where's the markedly different approach and outcome to having those places quite naturally evolve to what they've now become.

Taken in isolation and considering actual measurable factors one-on-one, there would be any number of cities in either country that could teach something to the other.

We need to just look at the actual title of the thread and debate that point alone; otherwise we'll end up in the usual slanging match over the price of walnuts in Newmarket versus Poughkeepsie.
I compare the 2 countries similar to 2 standard distribution graphs, with the midpoint being the median.

In the case of Canada, the graph is squeezed more, in that the “lows” are closer to the middle and the “highs” as well.

In the US, it’s stretched more, so the highs are higher but the lows lower.

If you’re in the upper quintile, both countries will be fine, but the US likely edges ahead. For the lowest 3 quintiles, Canada is likely better.

But without debating the price of walnuts, although it’s been a number of years for me, I did like Toronto’s approach to multiculturalism, and the concept of the “cultural mosaic”.

The US is founded on the motto of “e pluribus unum”...or also the “melting pot”. The idea for a long time is that while the immigrant maintains their language and culture their children learned English and American customs.
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Old 01-10-2021, 03:05 PM
 
20,901 posts, read 12,086,633 times
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I understand your points, and essentially agree with all of them.

Taken singly; Canada's illegal immigration problem in no way resembles that of the U.S. Canada tends to see illegals as you say in two categories only; overstays and periodic and predictable events such as the Haitians having their extensions ended in the U.S.
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Old Yesterday, 12:05 PM
 
133 posts, read 15,967 times
Reputation: 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
QOL as measured by various org's and agencies "bounces" to and fro when compared between the two countries.

The "happy" quotient doesn't move around as much and Canada is usually ahead on that one.

But, what do these really mean when taken apart to the individuals living parallel lifestyles?
Are autoworkers in the U.S. less happy than autoworkers in Canada, farmers, nurses, etc., etc.?

Cities in Canada do not in my mind, do anything markedly different by way of endorsing cultural uniqueness than do American cities. Take Caribbana in Toronto and compare it to Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Dare I mention Brampton in comparison to Dearborn? Where's the markedly different approach and outcome to having those places quite naturally evolve to what they've now become.

Taken in isolation and considering actual measurable factors one-on-one, there would be any number of cities in either country that could teach something to the other.

We need to just look at the actual title of the thread and debate that point alone; otherwise we'll end up in the usual slanging match over the price of walnuts in Newmarket versus Poughkeepsie.
No one can argue Canada is "so far ahead" on quality of life. Because it isn't.

The most directly measurable, quantifiable metric of life quality is material living standard, and for that, the US is much better than Canada.

That will dictate what kind of lifestyle you can afford.

On top of that, it's bottom 10% is hardly less rich than Canada's. It has a richer middle class, and it's cost of living is not as high - it has a better job market and a lower overall tax rate. Your money goes farther. This is what matters.

Happiness quotients are subjective, indirect nonsense.

The US has more people because it's been a more desirable society to move to. Period. More Canadians move to America than vice-versa for a reason.

Quality of life indices have been around for 100+ years, and 100+ years ago the US was still in very high QOL categories on such indices, with a very high income economy going as far back as the 1890s. The United Kingdom still isn't as rich as the US was in the 1970s.

It's the consistency and longevity of the US's high life quality, along with it's superlative material living standard, that vastly outstrips that of other western nations, Canada included. Add on the more dynamic, unique, and world-famous cultural landscape of the US compared to Canada, and the greater diversity of urban environments, geography, and climate, and you have a society that many saw as "the promised land". To this day, it maintains high rankings on QOL and standard of living measurements.

People nitpicking specific placements on such indices are ridiculous, considering how fickle these indices are from year to year. As long as your country is in the very high quality of life bracket, the placement matters little.

The US offers the highest level of wealth and life quality for the largest, most diverse array of people on the globe, and has done so the longest of any country. Just because Ireland places in 2nd on HDI this year doesn't erase that it simply doesn't have the same QOL and living standard track record that the US does, for example - for obvious reasons.
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Old Yesterday, 12:14 PM
 
133 posts, read 15,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
If you’re in the upper quintile, both countries will be fine, but the US likely edges ahead. For the lowest 3 quintiles, Canada is likely better.
But that is delusional - that means you think the US isn't livable at all for the average person - that it's only livable for rich people?

No basic observation of reality could give a person that conclusion.

For one, this is income distribution per nation:



Factoring in cost of living and tax rates, the US is simply the better place to live - for really every income bracket.

America's middle class, judging by an aggregate of socioeconomic measurements (average wage, median and average household income, median disposable income, GDP per capita, gross financial wealth per adult, financial consumption, GNI per capita) is richer than Canada's.

A lot of this stuff is common sense - which is why America has the better economy and the larger society - more people want to move there for a reason.
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Old Today, 08:21 AM
 
3 posts
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicinterest View Post
No one can argue Canada is "so far ahead" on quality of life. Because it isn't.

The most directly measurable, quantifiable metric of life quality is material living standard, and for that, the US is much better than Canada.

That will dictate what kind of lifestyle you can afford.

On top of that, it's bottom 10% is hardly less rich than Canada's. It has a richer middle class, and it's cost of living is not as high - it has a better job market and a lower overall tax rate. Your money goes farther. This is what matters.

Happiness quotients are subjective, indirect nonsense.

The US has more people because it's been a more desirable society to move to. Period. More Canadians move to America than vice-versa for a reason.

Quality of life indices have been around for 100+ years, and 100+ years ago the US was still in very high QOL categories on such indices, with a very high income economy going as far back as the 1890s. The United Kingdom still isn't as rich as the US was in the 1970s.

It's the consistency and longevity of the US's high life quality, along with it's superlative material living standard, that vastly outstrips that of other western nations, Canada included. Add on the more dynamic, unique, and world-famous cultural landscape of the US compared to Canada, and the greater diversity of urban environments, geography, and climate, and you have a society that many saw as "the promised land". To this day, it maintains high rankings on QOL and standard of living measurements.
.
LOL!

This user seems to be obsessed with everything related to Canada. It reminds me of Manitopia and Kimkukuyi, users who can't accept that their northern neighbor is doing things better.

There is a reason Canada ranks better than the US in all Quality of Life and Standard of Living studies.

Just look at the disaster in Texas for God's sake, a state looking to secede. Worse than a third world country, look at your half a million dead from COVID, your absurd crime rates, even worse than some African and Latin American cities, etc. Did Canada cause that?

Probably the most ridiculous statement is saying that X country is better than the other because there is more people.

Under that assumption then India with over 1 billion people has a better quality of life than Norway with less than 6 million, LOL
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Old Today, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,620 posts, read 1,618,293 times
Reputation: 1950
Quote:
Originally Posted by saritapelaez View Post
LOL!

This user seems to be obsessed with everything related to Canada. It reminds me of Manitopia and Kimkukuyi, users who can't accept that their northern neighbor is doing things better.

There is a reason Canada ranks better than the US in all Quality of Life and Standard of Living studies.

Just look at the disaster in Texas for God's sake, a state looking to secede. Worse than a third world country, look at your half a million dead from COVID, your absurd crime rates, even worse than some African and Latin American cities, etc. Did Canada cause that?

Probably the most ridiculous statement is saying that X country is better than the other because there is more people.

Under that assumption then India with over 1 billion people has a better quality of life than Norway with less than 6 million, LOL
Lol, that’s exactly what I thought after reading through so many threads about Canada in which he/she has commented on. It’s rather comical how excessively obsessed he is with telling Canadians how amazing the USA is and how poor, backwards and boring we are.
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