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Old 01-17-2012, 04:32 PM
 
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since i drove the car home with a full tank on 1/5, the fuel level on my new Toyota Yaris is approaching the halfway mark. I have probably put about 75 or 80 miles on it since then, all stop and go type traffic with about 3 miles of highway mixed in about 5 times per week

What is the minimum fuel level i should keep it especially in the winter months? The tank capacity is 11.1 gallons, which is 1.1 gal more than my old faithful
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rlrl View Post
since i drove the car home with a full tank on 1/5, the fuel level on my new Toyota Yaris is approaching the halfway mark. I have probably put about 75 or 80 miles on it since then, all stop and go type traffic with about 3 miles of highway mixed in about 5 times per week

What is the minimum fuel level i should keep it especially in the winter months? The tank capacity is 11.1 gallons, which is 1.1 gal more than my old faithful
It has always been my belief that 1/2 tank is "empty" so that I never run outta gas nor does the fuel pump suck up the normal gunk that forms in fuel tanks.

If a person wanted to use 1/4 tank in the summer that would be ok but never in winter. The extra fuel weight helps with winter traction.
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:42 PM
 
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The lower the level of fuel in the tank, the greater the chance of condensation taking place. Not good.

The trend appears to be for gas prices to increase again--at least in the short term--due to the permanent shutdown of at least 2 more US refineries. That means more importation of gasoline from overseas. Not good.

The gas gauges in cars are NOT laboratory-grade measuring devices, and just because the gauge indicates a half tank, that does not necessarily mean that you really have that much gas in the tank. Potentially, not good.

Since you are not saving money by deferring the purchase of gas that you will have to purchase anyway--at a potentially higher price--I have to ask:

Why does it sound like you feel the need to run the tank down to a really low level?
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Pipes View Post
The extra fuel weight helps with winter traction.
Not necessarily.
The Yaris is a FWD car.
The gas tank is located in the rear.

If anything, adding more weight to the rear of a FWD car helps to disrupt the normal "forward" bias of its weight distribution, and this could actually reduce traction.
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:27 PM
 
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Driving all the time near empty is a great way to burn up your fuel pump over time. The fuel provides cooling for the pump.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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I generally fill up on FI cars before I get to 1/4 tank. From the standpoint of the fuel pump, so long as you stay above about 1/4 tank you are good. There in NYC I would think you would never be more than a couple of miles from a gas station, so remaining range is not going to be important to you.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:20 PM
 
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yeah i'm heartbroken! the gas station that was here for years and years and was only footsteps from my apartment closed last year, so the closest one is now 4 blocks away!! bummer. another one is even further--12 blocks away!! disaster!!
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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You can safely run it until the light turns on. After that, the pump may start running warmer than normal due to lack of liquid immersion. I'd start looking at about the 1/4 mark, so you're not in any sort of panic.

When you fill up, just fill it up all the way. (I use pay at the pump to avoid going inside for my change.) The ethanol in most gasoline will absorb any condensation that had a chance to form since the last fill up, which is not much. It's a closed system, unless the gas cap is off/loose, so moisture doesn't get in normally between fill-ups.

(All fuel line anti-freeze/"fuel-drier" is, is ethanol or methanol. Therefore, there's no need to ever buy such products if the fuel in your area is "oxygenated," aka, contains ethanol.)

Fill up all the way at least every other time you get fuel, and you're very unlikely to ever have a problem.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Pipes View Post
The extra fuel weight helps with winter traction.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
Not necessarily.
The Yaris is a FWD car.
The gas tank is located in the rear.

If anything, adding more weight to the rear of a FWD car helps to disrupt the normal "forward" bias of its weight distribution, and this could actually reduce traction.
Baloney!

Weight is weight be it front or back it all adds up to traction in winter driving.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Northern MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Pipes View Post
Baloney!

Weight is weight be it front or back it all adds up to traction in winter driving.
Even more baloney.
Misplaced weight can actually take weight off of the drive and/or steering axles.

But I bet the engineers designed it to be balanced with a full tank of fuel.
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