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Old 07-10-2007, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Ohio, but moving to El Paso, TX August/September
431 posts, read 1,559,044 times
Reputation: 285

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Things I've learned:

1. Never go to Luxembourg on Second Christmas day. Nothing is open.

2. Different countries have different cultures. I may not like all the aspects of the other cultures, but they look at our culture like it is just as different so at least give it the good college try when you go abroad. When in Rome...

3. Never try to keep up in drinking with a European, they will win every time.

4. Don't take small kids to Britain if you can avoid it.

5. Dutch food is bad. Go to ethnic restaurants if there and stay away from the typical Dutch kitchen.

6. Countries exist that don't force religion down your throat which I can appreciate being a religious minority in this country. Tolerance is not a dirty word.

7. For all the faults of the capitalist system, you are better off in this country economically if you are upper middle to upper class. You are better off in most Western European countries economically if you are lower or lower middle class..

8. Long international flights with kids are the best if they are direct and you give the people around you candy ahead of time.

9. It's nice to see countries give full rights to all citizens regardless of sexual orientation. Once again, tolerance is not a dirty word.

10. We have a very dog eat dog mentality here (and I fully admit I'm guilty of this). It's nice in Western Europe where people are judged less by what they do and who they are. There, it's ok to not go to college. It's ok to be a low skilled worker. Here, not so much.

11. For me, I've learned a lot by going abroad, but there's no place like the US where social mobility is much easier, you can reap the fruit of your labor, and there is an ingrained sense to want to do better and not settle.
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Old 07-11-2007, 09:19 AM
CBB
 
Location: Munich + FL, 32082
481 posts, read 2,072,958 times
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7. For all the faults of the capitalist system, you are better off in this country economically if you are upper middle to upper class. You are better off in most Western European countries economically if you are lower or lower middle class..
I'd say you're always better off when you are upper middle to upper class, no matter where. But you're better off when being poor in Western Europe because we have a welfare system (which has its downsides as well, of course).

10. We have a very dog eat dog mentality here (and I fully admit I'm guilty of this). It's nice in Western Europe where people are judged less by what they do and who they are. There, it's ok to not go to college. It's ok to be a low skilled worker. Here, not so much.
Again Being a low skilled worker may be okay for some but not for those who are doing better.

I agree with #6 and #9. Those are things I really appreciate about Western Europe.
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Old 07-11-2007, 11:29 AM
 
207 posts, read 695,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBB View Post
7. For all the faults of the capitalist system, you are better off in this country economically if you are upper middle to upper class. You are better off in most Western European countries economically if you are lower or lower middle class..
I'd say you're always better off when you are upper middle to upper class, no matter where. But you're better off when being poor in Western Europe because we have a welfare system (which has its downsides as well, of course).

10. We have a very dog eat dog mentality here (and I fully admit I'm guilty of this). It's nice in Western Europe where people are judged less by what they do and who they are. There, it's ok to not go to college. It's ok to be a low skilled worker. Here, not so much.
Again Being a low skilled worker may be okay for some but not for those who are doing better.

I agree with #6 and #9. Those are things I really appreciate about Western Europe.

You don't have to go far to get # 6 and #9. Just head Noth of then border to CANADA
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Old 07-11-2007, 02:35 PM
 
1,397 posts, read 4,475,411 times
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Traveling taught me that there are wonderful people out there, no matter what race they are.
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Old 07-26-2007, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Roanoke VA
2,031 posts, read 6,257,120 times
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From my travels at an earlier age I learned:

How air travel can get you there so quickly and the anticipation of a new culture and new experiences await you when you arrive.

The history of Europe can be so humbling from an Americans' perspective. I remember walking down the street in front of Westminister Abbey in London and seeing gravesites that were over 300 years old.

How deja-vu or the feeling that "I have been here before" can be a real experience. I discovered the sensation on a street in Paris(of which my ancestors hailed).

How Japan seemed so closed to non-Japanese. We in the U.S. are so accustomed to a cosmopolitan lifestyle.

How isolated the average American is in relation to the world at large.
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Old 07-26-2007, 10:31 PM
 
1,397 posts, read 4,475,411 times
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I traveled throughout the whole Europe, I've been to Africa, now I live in America...I think that the BIGGEST thing I've learned is that people can be great friends no matter what race and religion they are!!!Honestly speaking, that is the biggest thing I've learned!!!
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Old 07-30-2007, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Southern California
31,391 posts, read 17,541,469 times
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Talking American conveniences

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
That indoor plumbing, underground sewers, central heating, refrigeration, and hot running water are the greatest inventions man has ever made.
I tend to agree with this. You don't know how much you take these things for granted until you travel to another country where these things aren't so common.

Traveling to another country has also taught me that we here in the U.S.A. are so incredibly blessed, not only materially, but with the vast range of opportunities as far as education and career choices. Also, the amount of freedom we have here, to be what we want and live where we want--thus, one of the reasons this forum exists.
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Old 08-02-2007, 11:22 AM
 
59 posts, read 212,433 times
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Default answer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingler View Post
I think I am a better person for all my travels overseas. It has taught me alot and now look at things differently as a result.

How has foreign travel changed you? What have you learned from the experience?
Here's what I've learned, or at the very least, my impressions.

a) lot's of people in other countries despise America.
b) lot's of travelling American's are arrogant beyond belief.
c) even poor American's are wealthy beyond belief as compared to...
d) American's care more, about the common good.
e) good people are good people, no matter where they live.

I've been to Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Mexico, Canada, Philippines.
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Old 08-03-2007, 07:11 AM
 
25,699 posts, read 24,731,708 times
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I can tell you that if you go to another country, you should have some basic language knowledge. Dont expect other countries to always know what you are trying to say. Ive heard up in some parts of Canada, (from several sources) namely Quebec, if you dont speak fluent French, you could have a problem.
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Old 08-05-2007, 06:24 PM
 
Location: New Zealand
1,872 posts, read 5,893,029 times
Reputation: 5575
Travel to a country where you don't look like the rest of the people gives you a small insight into what it's like to be a minority.

It's not just that you stand out and everyone looks at you, but more the fact that everyone has a preconceived notion of you as a person which you have to overcome, and that you become the de facto representative of your country, race, society, and culture -- suddenly, your individual actions help shape others' ideas of your country/race/society/culture.
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