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Old 09-14-2007, 03:44 AM
 
Location: Nottingham UK
39 posts, read 142,934 times
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As a UK Resident, I have always been confused by Americans I have spoken to re their visits to the UK. Many seem to visit London, then travel directly to Scotland before flying back home.

I live in the Central UK, (East Midlands) where compared with London we see relatively few American tourist. Our area in common with many areas of the UK has as much history and character as London.

Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Norfolk, Devon, Cornwall, The peaks, The Lake District, all great places to visit.

I would be interested to know where you go when visiting the UK, and what you liked and disliked?
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Old 09-14-2007, 05:11 AM
 
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I have only been to the UK once. I visited London. This is where I have family. I was only there a week. I would love to see other parts, including the Central region.
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Old 09-14-2007, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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The area you're talking about is my favorite. Especially the Lake District.

Most tourists do go to London. It's easy, the plane lands there. Just like most tourists from the UK end up on the east or west coasts of the US. Most never see anything in the middle.

Americans tend to not have a lot of vacation time and we try to see a lot in just a few days. In depth travel takes more time. It's easy to do in your country because the train system is so good.

Lots to see and do in London but to me it's not THE UK. Just like New York City isn't THE US.
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Old 09-14-2007, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Nottingham UK
39 posts, read 142,934 times
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My father Lives in LA where I am a regular visitor, but would not consider it to be representative of the whole of the US.

Yes the train systems are good, but dont you guys like to drive here?
You would see more and be able to stop where you want?
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Old 09-14-2007, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Red Sox Nation
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We have been to England many times. I have family in Kent and in the Midlands. We always rent a car when we go, because my husband and I enjoy the countryside and the small town more than the big cities. London is a great city, and yes, a lot of Americans do spend most of their time there.
I think a lot of Americans are intimidated by driving in the UK. But once you get the hang of it, it's not a problem.
There are too many wonderfull places to mention, and hard to pick favorites, but a few come to mind. We once spent a fantastic week in Cornwall. I especially loved St Ives. I really enjoyed the small Cotswold villages, and Blenheim Plaace was so beautufull. One of my favorite cities is York, with that amazing Minster and architecture. It felt like you were stepping back in time. We once spent a really nice day in Lincoln, and went to an evening church service in the Cathedral there. I was lucky enough to see DH Lawrence's (my favorite author) home in Easton. On one visit, we drove all around Wales, just looking at castles. We have never made it to the Lake District. That will be our next trip! What I love about England, and the UK in general, is that no matter where you are, how small or large the town, there is always somethng interesting to do or see.
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Old 09-14-2007, 12:29 PM
 
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We jsut came back from a week in the UK. Specifically Birmingham. We have family there. We flew into Dublin and then connected to Bmx.
We had a wonderful time. We went to Cadbury's, warwick castle, Stratford, took the train to London (cheaper at weekends), and in general had a fantastic time.

In the past we have taken the ferry from Dublin to Holyhead and driven up to Glasgow. Stopped at the Lake District on the way back.

I cant wait to go back. It is a wonderful place. Sure after a while all large cities are the same, its the countryside that is different. We loved the canals ; may look into renting a houseboat sometime
d
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Old 09-15-2007, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uk-mike View Post
My father Lives in LA where I am a regular visitor, but would not consider it to be representative of the whole of the US.

Yes the train systems are good, but dont you guys like to drive here?
You would see more and be able to stop where you want?
I only drove in the UK once. I wrecked a car on the M4 on a Sunday night trying to get back into London. I thought driving in London was very stressful and I decided I wouldn't do it again. But I wouldn't be volunteering to drive in NYC either!
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Old 09-15-2007, 04:30 AM
 
Location: Nottingham UK
39 posts, read 142,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I only drove in the UK once. I wrecked a car on the M4 on a Sunday night trying to get back into London. I thought driving in London was very stressful and I decided I wouldn't do it again. But I wouldn't be volunteering to drive in NYC either!
Sorry to hear about that!

I know the feeling driving the LA Freways, Is New York any worse than LA. Where do you live that is easier on drivimg? I find Florida to be fairly stress Free. Thinking about it I wouldnt want to drive in London either.

Thanks to others for their replies, nice to know some are taking in more than the Londom >>> Scotland experience.
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Old 09-15-2007, 07:23 PM
 
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We have often visited. I have a friend in Liecester and last time I stayed with her and saw a lot. Once we spent a month taking care of a friend's home in Basingstoke whilst they were in France and took the trains as far as we could each day. This was back in the 80s when train travel was fun. The old wooden coaches with many doors and lots of kids commuting to school. We went as far north as Harrogate and York and south to Devon and Brighton. Loved Arundel castle. Took our parents to England for their 40th wedding anniversary.

Best drive I ever had was a local bus that drove thru the countryside from village to village around Salisbury. So beautiful.

But London is where we start and end.
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Old 09-16-2007, 12:57 AM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
2,408 posts, read 14,342,591 times
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I have only been to the London area my two times in England. I took the train from London-Paris once and another from Harwich-London (arrived in Harwich via the ferry from the Netherlands) and thought the countryside in passing was beautiful. I would love to properly explore more of the United Kingdom. I've seen pictures of some absolutely beautiful areas in England that I never even realized existed. I saw a photographic thread on another message board I go to that was devoted to a coastal area (or maybe an island) of the UK whose name I wish I could remember (maybe the Hebrides? Isle of Man? Cornwall?) where the environment looked almost tropical with white sandy desolate beaches, hilly greenery and tropical-looking flora and fauna. I was shocked that such a place existed in England.

I think a lot of Americans don't think that the UK has much to offer besides London. I think considering it's proximity to the more renowned beaches, countryside and scenery of continental Europe, that a lot of Americans just skip over the idea of exploring the UK outside of London and perhaps Scotland, and just head to France or Switzerland or Italy instead.
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