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Old 07-23-2012, 06:38 PM
 
18,845 posts, read 34,823,507 times
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Fyi....the DOT is a cabinet level branch. They interpret the ADA, and are compliant...based on their own interpretation of a "service animal". Their interpretation is stricter....and no, a therapy dog is not a service animal...it is therapy and comfort....the dog does not perform a specific function, trained to perform a function like guiding a blind person, alerting a siezure patient, picking up items for a quadriplegic. Comfort service is not considered an activity of daily living.
http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm
http://www.assistancedogsinternation...gStandards.php

Last edited by jasper12; 07-23-2012 at 07:17 PM.. Reason: edit
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:35 AM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,934 posts, read 7,900,472 times
Reputation: 3497
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
this was not a comfort dog. Sarge is a certified service dog with appropriate saddle with all the proper id. This man and his wife run a foundation which helps place dogs with similar vets with disabilities. Many wounded vets have SERVICE dogs even if we cannot see the disability. Especially vets with traumatic brain damage and their dogs do provide a service. Many of these vets would not be able to even leave their homes without their service dogs.
You appear to have a personal involvement with this incident which you should probably disclose so that readers can take that into consideration when thinking about your allegatons. In time, facts usually see the light of day. I sense there's more to the story than you've shared.
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Old 07-24-2012, 02:23 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 21,532,384 times
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Some information has arose (not yet confirmed) that this may not have been the individuals first brush with the airlines. Some are saying, in quiet voices, that the trips are designed to push the limit of these service anaimals on airlines. Even though they may know the ADA/DOT regulations, they feel their dogs should be included so they are sort of creating the PR situation to bring light on their cause. Supposedly there are some public info on this, so if anyone comes across it, post the link.
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Old 07-24-2012, 03:20 PM
 
13,507 posts, read 16,304,533 times
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A pet site with info on service animals and comfort animals. Therapy Animals | Comfort Animals - Pet Travel
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Old 07-24-2012, 05:41 PM
 
13,808 posts, read 24,856,214 times
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The shuttles at IAD aren't even run by UAL, they are airport employees.

I hate to say it but you get what you pay for. In most cases the airline employees are making $10 or less per hour, you don't get top tier service at those wages, just isn't going to happen.
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Old 07-25-2012, 02:38 AM
 
13,507 posts, read 16,304,533 times
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It would help if there were eye witness testimony to the alleged abuse of the animal. As for the man's interactions with airline employees that may be more difficult if they occured one-on-one without being overheard.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:49 PM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,934 posts, read 7,900,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificFlights View Post
Some information has arose (not yet confirmed) that this may not have been the individuals first brush with the airlines. Some are saying, in quiet voices, that the trips are designed to push the limit of these service anaimals on airlines. Even though they may know the ADA/DOT regulations, they feel their dogs should be included so they are sort of creating the PR situation to bring light on their cause. Supposedly there are some public info on this, so if anyone comes across it, post the link.
And ... he didn't make his reservation directly with United. He used an online travel agency site. As I said earlier in the discussion, over time the facts will come out. And I'm suspecting more strongly now this is probably a made-up story, with the purpose to gain publicity for the group.
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,570 posts, read 16,729,903 times
Reputation: 16646
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
My issue with this, is that based on this article, the dog is NOT a service dog, a "service dog" performs an actual "service" for a person with a disability, such as a guide dog, who guides a blind person. This veteran states he has PTSD, that indicates to me, that this is a "therapy dog", and United Airlines IS NOT required to transport these dogs, as therapy dogs are not covered by the Department of Transportation, to follow the ADA law, passed by congress. The DOT has a separate law, that specifies a service dog, that actually does a service. A therapy dog is not performing a compensatory service.

Now, that being said, in the article, it states the dog was kicked by airline personell, that is inappropriate, however, if the dog was adaquately trained, by a school, the dog would have been close to his owner, seated. Which makes me question if this dog has a certifciate from a school, and has been trained appropriately. Many veterans get a dog, for comfort, state it is their "service" dog, and expect the same level of treatment, as someone with a guide dog, who has been trained for countless hours, and is certified as a service dog. The issue with this, is a myriad of problems, especially if someone has a large German Shepard, is this dog aggressive? There is no certification of comprensive training...from an approved school.

Just my two cents on this issue.

And my 10c on the issue of service dogs: There is no rule/regulation that a service dog must be trained by a school, nor is there any type of certificate which is recognized or required.

Only your last sentence is correct: There is no certification. There is no "approved" school. Period.

Additionally, the ADA revision - 2011 - on what constitutes a service animal - specifically states

PTSD as a covered disability for which there is a service animal.

Here is the link:

Revised ADA Requirements: Service Animals

Additionally, it makes reference to the broader definitions under the Air Carrier Access Act.


So on all counts, EXCEPT for the last statement, what you posted is incorrect.

Whether it's a GSD, monkey, or great Dane, if the owner states it's a service animal, it's a service animal. The only dispute of that would be the animal not being under control of the handicapped person or an animal that is misbehaving.
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Old 07-26-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,570 posts, read 16,729,903 times
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BTW, after 2 days in an airport, that service animal needed some opportunity to walk around and stretch its legs - just as humans do. It also needed a place to go potty. And being that it was in Alaska, I have a feeling the humans weren't dressed for outdoors. No service animal is "supposed" to be on a leash 24/7. The airline has to take FULL responsibility for the situation.
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Old 07-26-2012, 10:58 AM
 
13,808 posts, read 24,856,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post
BTW, after 2 days in an airport, that service animal needed some opportunity to walk around and stretch its legs - just as humans do. It also needed a place to go potty. And being that it was in Alaska, I have a feeling the humans weren't dressed for outdoors. No service animal is "supposed" to be on a leash 24/7. The airline has to take FULL responsibility for the situation.
Did you read the article? They were in Washington DC. And he spent two days in the airport. The airline is not responsible for that. The airlines/airport do not lodge people - hotels do. He also doesn't even specify what "airline employee" is. Like I said above he said the shuttle driver kicked his dog, that is an airport (county?) worker not even related to UAL. Plus allowing your dog to invade someone else's personal space certainly warrants a reaction if someone is afraid of dogs. You also have no idea if the "kick" was really a series of nudges that didn't get the point across.
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