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Old 11-10-2006, 07:22 PM
 
2 posts, read 13,407 times
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Thank you for all the good tips for this trip, it was very helphul for me as probably it was for HouseMartin.

Enduangel
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Old 11-11-2006, 11:25 AM
 
Location: in a house
5,835 posts, read 4,230,477 times
Reputation: 4890
My family traveled by car from Massachusetts to California two years ago by car and it took us four days driving Highway 80 or route 6. We passed probably, in my opinion the most boring parts of the U.S. No problems with danger at any time, just lots an lots of cornfields! We went through New York,PA.,Ohio,Illinois,Indiana,Nebraska, Colorado,Neveda, and then California. Then again, we weren't into it for the sightseeing..just wanted to get to California asap. Now I wonder why? Quality Inns, Resident Inns and Holiday Inns have free breakfast and most times kids are free. Good luck!
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Old 11-12-2006, 05:29 AM
 
Location: Where the grass grows
175 posts, read 280,458 times
Reputation: 87
Thanks a lot for your advices, Chris and all the mates.

Puffle: the most boring parts of the U.S.A.? Never mind, I love the road, and lots and lots of cornfields can be funny with good music .
Chris: if you say that the biggest risk is bears at campgrounds, you mean that isn't any risk, isn't? I can't imagine any place in USA next to a motorway with bears around it. Well, anyway, good adventure for the children...
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Old 11-12-2006, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Missouri
6,046 posts, read 22,047,036 times
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Yes, that is what I meant, that risk is very, very low. And oh yes, there are areas near major highways with bears. Bears are generally intelligent enough to know to stay away from major roadways, but not always. We camped off of major highways in New Mexico, Montana, and California, and received stern warning that bears could come into the campground, so we had to take specific precautions (for example, never leave food or anything scented in the tent). Also I used to live in northeastern Pennsylvania and every once in a blue moon, a bear would cross the road and get hit by a car! Oops. So we have bears pretty much everywhere, although you are not very likely to see many, and you will probably see none. You will see deer; they are everywhere!

When you know it, you may want to consider posting what cities you plan to pass through, and people here can let you know if there are certain areas to avoid. But overall, I think America is very safe.
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Old 03-02-2008, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Kauai
649 posts, read 3,243,006 times
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Default East to West in summer

We're going to be driving cross-country this summer - two 40-somethings and our 12-yr-old son. We're relocating to Hawaii, and want to see some more of the mainland before we go. We want to start in Washington D.C. (we'll be going down there from upstate NY, because we want to show our son a few of the sights of D.C.) and end in San Francisco, with a stop in Colorado (we have a friend there). We want to do it in about 2 weeks, maybe a little more. So, we'll have time to stop and see things, and not go at too hectic a driving pace.

Here is my question: should we go through Missouri and Kansas, or Iowa and Nebraska? I-80 or I-70?

And, any other tips? We will be traveling light, not camping, as once in SF we will be putting our car on a transport to Hawaii and will have to take everything we have with us on the plane (or junk it, or send it in a box or two to the islands). We plan on staying in moderately priced hotels and trying not to spend TOO much along the way. We're big on natural beauty, outdoor activities and history, not so much on heavily-tourist-type "attractions".
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Old 03-03-2008, 04:32 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 55,220,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetbeet View Post
We're going to be driving cross-country this summer - two 40-somethings and our 12-yr-old son. We're relocating to Hawaii, and want to see some more of the mainland before we go. We want to start in Washington D.C. (we'll be going down there from upstate NY, because we want to show our son a few of the sights of D.C.) and end in San Francisco, with a stop in Colorado (we have a friend there). We want to do it in about 2 weeks, maybe a little more. So, we'll have time to stop and see things, and not go at too hectic a driving pace.

Here is my question: should we go through Missouri and Kansas, or Iowa and Nebraska? I-80 or I-70?

And, any other tips? We will be traveling light, not camping, as once in SF we will be putting our car on a transport to Hawaii and will have to take everything we have with us on the plane (or junk it, or send it in a box or two to the islands). We plan on staying in moderately priced hotels and trying not to spend TOO much along the way. We're big on natural beauty, outdoor activities and history, not so much on heavily-tourist-type "attractions".
That is a tough call. Eastern Missouri is actually a very pretty area as is SE Iowa, the rest of the states are pretty flat and open. I would say that there is probably more to do in Missouri then Iowa but not so much in Kansas and Nebraska.

The St. Louis area has a lot of things to do and see with the zoo, the Gateway Arch, Grant's Farm and our personal favorite the City Museum. It is worth a stop in St. Louis for a day or so.
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Old 03-03-2008, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,617,657 times
Reputation: 1932
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetbeet View Post
We're going to be driving cross-country this summer - two 40-somethings and our 12-yr-old son. We're relocating to Hawaii, and want to see some more of the mainland before we go. We want to start in Washington D.C. (we'll be going down there from upstate NY, because we want to show our son a few of the sights of D.C.) and end in San Francisco, with a stop in Colorado (we have a friend there). We want to do it in about 2 weeks, maybe a little more. So, we'll have time to stop and see things, and not go at too hectic a driving pace.

Here is my question: should we go through Missouri and Kansas, or Iowa and Nebraska? I-80 or I-70?

And, any other tips? We will be traveling light, not camping, as once in SF we will be putting our car on a transport to Hawaii and will have to take everything we have with us on the plane (or junk it, or send it in a box or two to the islands). We plan on staying in moderately priced hotels and trying not to spend TOO much along the way. We're big on natural beauty, outdoor activities and history, not so much on heavily-tourist-type "attractions".
I would suggest I-70 from Denver west. Since your interest is in natural beauty, you will find plenty of it on this route, especially in western Colorado and Utah. There are also lots of neat things to see nearby (Arches & Canyonlands National Parks, for example). If you really want to see some beautiful sights, try some of the non-interstate routes in southern Utah (for example: US 191, SR 12, and/or SR 24). If you decide to stay on I-70, when you reach I-15, you'll have to head either north or south if you want to stay on the interstate.

If you don't mind leaving the interstate, US 6 through the middle of western Utah and Nevada has some neat sights, but it's pretty lonely. One option to consider is that you could take US 6 - which is co-signed with US 191 until it splits north of Helper, UT - from I-70 just west of Green River, UT, through Price, UT, then on to I-15, and across the rest of UT into Nevada. Otherwise, you could take I-70 to I-15 North to US 6 West. Some of the desert stretches in Nevada can get pretty long if you're not into that sort of thing. US 6 also passes by Great Basin National Park, so you might want to check that out. Once you get into California, you can take US 6 to SR 120 over Tioga pass through Yosemite. This is a beautiful drive.
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Old 03-04-2008, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Kauai
649 posts, read 3,243,006 times
Reputation: 466
Thanks for the suggestions!
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