Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Tucson
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-13-2010, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,869 posts, read 16,316,053 times
Reputation: 29240

Advertisements

A person in my family, who shall remain nameless, planted what is supposed to be a "dwarf" orange tree in our back yard. Very, very stupidly, I said, "I don't care," when asked where it should be placed. So it ended up in front of the bay window of the master bedroom. Theoretically, that would be fine since the room could use some shade.


However ...


This home is in the NW suburb of Tucson. I consider two of its biggest assets to be the fact that we see the sunset from the dining room bay window and mountains from the back yard. This mountain view includes a lovely scene of my neighbors' terracotta tile roofs and then Pusch Ridge, also visible from the master bedroom. In fact, if the drapes are open, you can wake up in the morning and view this picture while you are still lying in bed. It seems to me if I were to put my house up for sale, that feature would add to the value of the home.


The person who planted the orange tree does not see this my way and maintains that it's no problem that this "dwarf" has already grown taller than the concrete block fence and by next year will totally obliterate the bedroom-window view. Even in the back yard, the tree will have a negative impact on the view from some angles. I believe the argument went, "If the new owners don't like it, they can chop it down after I'm gone." I maintain that the new owner won't know what s/he has, and certainly won't pay for what s/he doesn't even know is there, if the tree stays in place.


I consulted a professional landscaper (not someone's brother-in-law or the guys from in front of Home Depot) about moving the tree. He said it can be done, since it won't have to go far. But this season is the last possible time a successful transplant is likely. The protector of the tree believes moving it is a "complete waste of money" and I am being silly.


The home will not be sold anytime soon. Like many properties in Tucson, it has lost "value" in the last three years and if forced to sell today we would incur a considerable loss. Since it's not wise to add any upgrades to a home in this situation, I believe it is also unwise to obscure an asset that already exists. I don't think waking up to a view of green leaves has an equal real estate value to waking up to a view of Pusch Ridge.


Agree or disagree? How much would you pay to see the sunrise bouncing colors off a mountain range every morning? Opinions are welcome.


PS: The dwarf has yet to produce even a single orange.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2010, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,576 posts, read 6,349,028 times
Reputation: 758
I think a nice mountain view adds some value to your house, but probably not a tremendous amount of value given the plethora of mountain views in Tucscon (the city is essentially in a valley surrounded by mountains). I think the value of a scenic view "feature" comes down to supply and demand. Contrast a Tucson mountain view with, say, an unobstructed view of Mount Hood in Portland. Given the hills and tree cover in Portland, combined with the fact that Hood is a single peak in a specific location, a scenic view of this mountain is a rarer (and thus more prized) thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2010, 08:08 AM
 
476 posts, read 1,676,707 times
Reputation: 718
As a current homeseller AND Tucson homebuyer my suggestion is... take a TON of great photos of the view you presently have from the areas that you mention - inlcuding the beautiful sunsets, thorugh the bay window and even morning shots from the bedroom. That way you can create and use these shots in a photo album that is displayed with your real estate materials so they can indeed see the potential of what they might not see otherwise.

It sounds like YOU enjoy the unobstructed view. If it is going to obliterate YOUR view and enjoyment of your house now, then transplant it. If the cost to move the tree is not fruitful then you can put a new one in a more strategic spot.

If you leave the tree and decide to sell your house and you get a few comments such as "I like the house, but wish they had a better view of Pusch Ridge" then you can go ahead and chop that bad boy down. That being said... most buyers will want a house that they have to do as little as possible when they move in - you don't want to give them any reason to bypass your home for another.

I included a small "Before & After" album that I left on the table with the marketing materials to show buyers what we have done to the house & yard since we took possession of it - that way they can see the added value.
.

To throw this another direction entirely... is it possible to "Espalier" the tree, that is train it to hug the wall? Not sure if it is too hot in AZ to do that? There is a lot of information on espalier technique online, but here are soem classic styles and a photo of an orange tree trained ona wall. That might allow you both to get what you want!







Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2010, 09:12 PM
 
4,235 posts, read 14,060,609 times
Reputation: 4253
can you trim back the tree a bit starting now and once a year from now on to hold onto the view?...

you said, sort of, that it's in front of a block wall....leaves sound nicer than a block wall....

transplant sounds too expensive and risky.....

how incredible really is the Pusch Ridge view?....can you enjoy that view from other rooms and/or a patio?....

how about cutting down the tree and starting over with lower plants?....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2010, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,869 posts, read 16,316,053 times
Reputation: 29240
Quote:
Originally Posted by azdr0710 View Post
can you trim back the tree a bit starting now and once a year from now on to hold onto the view?...
you said, sort of, that it's in front of a block wall....leaves sound nicer than a block wall....
transplant sounds too expensive and risky.....
how incredible really is the Pusch Ridge view?....can you enjoy that view from other rooms and/or a patio?....
how about cutting down the tree and starting over with lower plants?....

I need to clarify, since I've obviously made it sound like this tree is against the wall. It's not -- it's midway between the wall and the bay window. There are actually very nice roses growing against the wall, which are also largely unseen now thanks to the tree.

Every home in my community has an identical block wall surrounding the back yard. Actually it's nice, since it keeps coyotes out (we are near Canada del Oro wash) and it keeps me from having to see my neighbor in his hot tub. But the wall is only 7 feet tall, so if I kept trimming the tree it would remain the bush it essentially is now.

The view is only visible from the east side of the backyard and out the windows of the bedroom. It is not seen at all from the patio. I don't know how to describe the view -- is it incredible? The first poster who responded indicated he thinks mountain views are so common in Tucson, it doesn't have much special value. To that I would just say, it's a completely unobstructed view of Pusch Ridge (as seen driving east on Tangerine Road), which changes color throughout the day and often has magnificent cloud formations above it. The highest crags had snow on them much of this winter. At sunset, it's often purple and orange. Obviously, I appreciate it more than others.

The landscaper says any tree transplant is risky to some extent, but this one he feels is doable right now since it's only moving a few yards. He's doing other work at my house, so he will move the tree for an additional $100. It would actually cost more to remove it, if that ever needed to be done. I know that, because I've already had to remove a mesquite tree from the property.

Cutting down the tree is not an option to the person who planted it. Brooks2007, thanks for your very creative espalier idea. I've seen that done to many kinds of fruit trees in France. I think it's very interesting, but the tree isn't planted close enough to the wall for it to work in this case.

Thanks to everyone who's taken the time to respond!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2010, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Oro Valley AZ.
1,024 posts, read 2,747,458 times
Reputation: 1196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
A person in my family, who shall remain nameless, planted what is supposed to be a "dwarf" orange tree in our back yard. Very, very stupidly, I said, "I don't care," when asked where it should be placed. So it ended up in front of the bay window of the master bedroom. Theoretically, that would be fine since the room could use some shade.


However ...


This home is in the NW suburb of Tucson. I consider two of its biggest assets to be the fact that we see the sunset from the dining room bay window and mountains from the back yard. This mountain view includes a lovely scene of my neighbors' terracotta tile roofs and then Pusch Ridge, also visible from the master bedroom. In fact, if the drapes are open, you can wake up in the morning and view this picture while you are still lying in bed. It seems to me if I were to put my house up for sale, that feature would add to the value of the home.


The person who planted the orange tree does not see this my way and maintains that it's no problem that this "dwarf" has already grown taller than the concrete block fence and by next year will totally obliterate the bedroom-window view. Even in the back yard, the tree will have a negative impact on the view from some angles. I believe the argument went, "If the new owners don't like it, they can chop it down after I'm gone." I maintain that the new owner won't know what s/he has, and certainly won't pay for what s/he doesn't even know is there, if the tree stays in place.


I consulted a professional landscaper (not someone's brother-in-law or the guys from in front of Home Depot) about moving the tree. He said it can be done, since it won't have to go far. But this season is the last possible time a successful transplant is likely. The protector of the tree believes moving it is a "complete waste of money" and I am being silly.


The home will not be sold anytime soon. Like many properties in Tucson, it has lost "value" in the last three years and if forced to sell today we would incur a considerable loss. Since it's not wise to add any upgrades to a home in this situation, I believe it is also unwise to obscure an asset that already exists. I don't think waking up to a view of green leaves has an equal real estate value to waking up to a view of Pusch Ridge.


Agree or disagree? How much would you pay to see the sunrise bouncing colors off a mountain range every morning? Opinions are welcome.


PS: The dwarf has yet to produce even a single orange.
I'd move the tree. Not something one can really quantify for resale value without knowing the neighborhood or seeing the actual view. But views of Pusch Ridge are a BIG plus in resale. Citrus trees are a dime a dozen, and some people view them as a negative. A "Wow" factor for any home is a big plus, whether it is views, decorating style, condition etc. So if the tree were gone, and if prospective buyers were to walk into your bedroom, do you think their first comment be "oh wow, look at the views"? If so move the tree. And You are right, majority of people won't think about what the view might be like without the tree. With the tree gone, they could envision waking up in the morning and watching the sunrise over Pusch Ridge. It's the old first impression thing.
100 bucks is a bargain to move it also! So For 100 bucks you could have views and a citrus tree. For 100 bucks there would be peace in the house and you could sleep nights, (I noticed the time of your last post, 3:35am!)

Last edited by RickTucsonHomes; 06-14-2010 at 08:49 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2010, 07:59 AM
 
476 posts, read 1,676,707 times
Reputation: 718
I aprreciate your comments about the value the view of the ever changing mountains. No, it might not be Mt. Rainier, but it is YOUR view and YOU like it!

If your landscaper will transplant it now for $100 - I would "GO FOR IT!" Especially since it could cost more to remove later. Also - since it is not producing, it's value it's negatives in that spot outweigh the positives, blocking what you clearly consider a great feature and element of personal pleasure! If you don't you may come to resent said tree (and unnamed person) when the dwarf tree blocks your view entirely.

I'd be sure wherever you put it to amend the soil well, and add B-12 to help eliminate the shock of the move. Plently of TLC and water!

Found this information on the link below. Plant Citrus Trees - Young two to five-year-old trees transplant most successfully. Larger, older trees are more costly, harder to transplant without injury (to yourself and the tree), and suffer more from transplant shock. It will generally be three years after transplant before fruit production and that is the same whether you plant a 2-year-old tree or a 10-year-old tree. (May explain why no fruit yet?).

There is lots more info here: Caring For Citrus

And on transplanting - this is container oriented, but it gives pointers on what to look for: Four Winds Growers: Transplanting Citrus Trees

Post before & after pics for us!
.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2010, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Miramar, FL
117 posts, read 286,811 times
Reputation: 64
I think 95% of Tucson homes have a "Mountain View", lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2010, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Tucson
42,831 posts, read 88,150,679 times
Reputation: 22814
Quote:
Originally Posted by polo708 View Post
I think 95% of Tucson homes have a "Mountain View", lol
Not quite. How many houses have this kind of view and how many can afford them?



http://www.tucson-luxury-homes.com/newtestpic.jpg



http://imagesus.homeaway.com/mda01/f...f1c1b6bb30aa85



http://pimage9.homesandland.com/imag...A01I441889.jpg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2010, 05:26 PM
 
Location: GoJoe
713 posts, read 1,461,147 times
Reputation: 322
Quote:
Originally Posted by sierraAZ View Post
Not quite. How many houses have this kind of view and how many can afford them?
well, to be fair, "view" and "in the mountain" are two different things. a home near UoA, say between campbell and alvernon / pima to flowing wells really dont have good view of mountains, but most of tucson homes do have a "view".

i think "view" is used way too often to try and upsell a home. wash area behind a home is a plus, a ending community (the end of a sprawl) is also a plus.

btw, are some of those pics stone canyon? i like stone canyon, some 3+mil homes had to be reduced to sub mil price due to housing bust......


and to OP, just offer prospective buyer a option to move or remove the tree at your costs, this way you dont have to make the decision, etc....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Tucson

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:38 PM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top