U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Tucson
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-15-2010, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Virginia
10 posts, read 25,847 times
Reputation: 16

Advertisements

Hello everyone, I could use your advice.

I plan to move from Virginia to Arizona or New Mexico and find property that allows horses for about $200,000. I'd like a town without rush hour traffic that supports the arts, with a liberal bent, singles in their 40s-60s, and summer temps not above 100. You're laughing, aren't you? I may be dreaming, but I know you guys will set me straight.

I'm in Arizona now and have about 8 days to explore. Plans now include checking out Bisbee, Tubac (too expensive?), Patagonia, and Silver City. Help me set my course, please. Thank you!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-16-2010, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Southern Arizona
9,549 posts, read 29,902,726 times
Reputation: 11527
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmyScammahorn View Post
Hello everyone, I could use your advice.

I plan to move from Virginia to Arizona or New Mexico and find property that allows horses for about $200,000. I'd like a town without rush hour traffic that supports the arts, with a liberal bent, singles in their 40s-60s, and summer temps not above 100. You're laughing, aren't you? I may be dreaming, but I know you guys will set me straight.

I'm in Arizona now and have about 8 days to explore. Plans now include checking out Bisbee, Tubac (too expensive?), Patagonia, and Silver City. Help me set my course, please. Thank you!!
Not all that difficult, Emmy.

Have you checked North of Tucson? Many small towns and lots of open spaces as you drive towards Phoenix on Oracle Road (Route 77) yet still fairly convenient to Tucson.

What part of Virginia? I grew up back there.

WELCOME and Good Luck.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Virginia
10 posts, read 25,847 times
Reputation: 16
Thank you, Bummer. Not all that difficult, eh? I love that answer!!! I think I've driven 77 from Show Low to Globe, but am not sure; it was a couple of years ago. I'll definitely try 77. Close to Tucson, would it be triple-digit hot in the summer? I'm hoping to avoid searing heat, although I'm going to have to compromise on something.

I grew up in Fairfax and live in Bailey's Crossroads now, a few miles away from the Pentagon. It's solid roads and buildings now.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2010, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Southern Arizona
9,549 posts, read 29,902,726 times
Reputation: 11527
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmmyScammahorn View Post
Thank you, Bummer. Not all that difficult, eh? I love that answer!!! I think I've driven 77 from Show Low to Globe, but am not sure; it was a couple of years ago. I'll definitely try 77. Close to Tucson, would it be triple-digit hot in the summer? I'm hoping to avoid searing heat, although I'm going to have to compromise on something.

I grew up in Fairfax and live in Bailey's Crossroads now, a few miles away from the Pentagon. It's solid roads and buildings now.
As with any city, the further out you go, "the more for your money" rule will apply.

Just an FYI . . . unlike the Phoenix area, the Tucson area rarely has more than a dozen or so "triple digits" each Summer. Also, 100 to 105 is not nearly as brutal as 85 to 90 in Virginia. Remember the UGH Summers are only July and August while the remaining ten months are near perfect. Go to the higher elevations and you'll experience some fairly cold Winters.

I grew up in Arlington and spent most summers along the coast.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2010, 08:35 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,768 times
Reputation: 10
Default Arizona heat

I'm a horse person too, and I've never been to Arizona. However, I have heard from people I know there that the coolest (or one of the coolest, in terms of temperature) places is near Prescott or Sedona -- in those areas. And people there say, as above, that heat without humidity is more tolerable than heat with humidity. I haven't been there yet, so it will be interesting to see what "heat without humidity" is like.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2010, 08:23 AM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
20,458 posts, read 25,171,941 times
Reputation: 7614
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwesterner92 View Post
I'm a horse person too, and I've never been to Arizona. However, I have heard from people I know there that the coolest (or one of the coolest, in terms of temperature) places is near Prescott or Sedona -- in those areas. And people there say, as above, that heat without humidity is more tolerable than heat with humidity. I haven't been there yet, so it will be interesting to see what "heat without humidity" is like.
Well, most folks seem to think that Arizona is one big desert, but that's not nearly the case - just as it's not true that the entire state is super hot. The first - and most important - thing to understand about the climate in Arizona is that the primary driver is not really how far north or south you are in the state, but rather what your elevation is. Arizona has HUGE variations in elevation from place to place - and consequently huge variations in climate (and vegitation) as well. As a general rule, if you draw a diagonal line from the NW corner of the state to the SE corner of the state the area above that line is at pretty high elevation while the area below that line is at pretty low elevation (and thus much warmer).

What IS absolutely accurate is that the SW corner of the state is the hottest part - not only of the state, but pretty much of the entire country. While the northern part of the state is dominated by the nearly 8,000 foot high Colorado Plateau (this is the Plateau the Colorado River cuts through to create the Grand Canyon) the southern section of the state abruptly drops in elevation along the edge of the plateau down to the lower elevation deserts. While the area atop this plateau - especially the area along the very center of the diagonal (places like Flagstaff etc) is largely pine forest, the area south of - and thus below - the plateau is true desert. Phoenix, Tucson and most the population of the state lay in this lower desert region. The area more or less along the line of the drop off (which is quite sudden) is often extremely scenic - Sedona for example is drop dead GORGEOUS and lies right along this borderline area between the high country plateau and the lowland deserts.

From this sudden drop-off just north of Phoenix, the land continues to slowly drop downwards towards the SW. This is the area of lowest elevation in the entire state and essentially the further SW you go, the lower it gets - Yuma for example (along the California border & near Mexico) is at a mere 200 feet - and in the summer it is unGodly hot. Except for areas along the Colorado River (which runs along the California border) that are irrigated, SW Arizona is pretty darned barren, with very little rainfall and sparce vegitation. This part of the state is SERIOUS desert.

The rest of Southern Arizona slowly gains in elevation as you move east towards the New Mexico border - with Phoenix at 1,000 feet, Tucson at 2,400 feet, Benson at 3,600 feet, Sierra Vista at 4,200 feet and Bisbee at 5,300 feet. This elevation gain is for the most part gradual and not really noticable. In addition to this general elevation gain as you move east, there are also a number of scattered mountain ranges towering above the lowlands. The various clumps of mountains (the Catalinas, the Santa Ritas, the Whetstones, etc) are collectively known as the Sky Islands and get up to 9,000 feet or so - high enough to be forested with pines - AND critically, to form rainclouds.

Aside from these tree-covered mountains, the lowlands gradually change over from the truly barren deserts of the SW corner of the state, to the relatively lush grasslands of the SE corner of the state. This happens (again) partially because of the general elevation gain that takes place as you move eastward but mostly because of the presence of all those rain collecting Sky Islands. Scientists refer to this area as the Apache Grasslands and it's pretty ideal horse country (some of the areas south of Wilcox along highway 181/186/191 are very lush indeed - at least by Southwest standards). The general elevation gain and the presence of the various Sky Islands produces more abundant rainfall than in the SW corner of the state - consequently the presence of grassland and scrubland rather than true desert.

Along with the increase in rainfall as you move eastward in Southern Arizona, there is also the expected moderation of temperatures as well. As I mentioned, Yuma - in the SW corner of the state - is a blast furnace in the summer (though pretty darned delightful in the winter) but summer temps become easier to bear as you move east. Phoenix is still super hot in the summer (but again with nice winter temps) but summer in Tucson is a bit easier to take, Benson a bit easier yet, and places like Wilcox and (especially) Sierra Vista have a VERY NICE climate indeed with very pleasant summers and pretty darned mild (though not entirely frost-free) winters. Again, keep in mind that ALL of this - the temperature AND the rainfall - is driven by the elevation of these various towns and cities and the nearby presence of the scattered Sky Islands.

We have property that sits on a small rise along I-10 between Tucson (40 minutes away) and Benson (10 minutes away) and runs between the Whetstone Mts to the south and the Rincons & Little Rincon Mts to the north that puts us a bit above Benson and at a nice elevation of 4,200 feet. This gives us a bit cooler climate than Tucson's 2,400 feet or so - and more like that of Sierra Vista. Our average summer highs in June, July & August are 93, 91 & 88 and our average December and January highs (the coldest months) are 60 with average overnight lows in the mid-upper 30's (occasionally below freezing at night). Vegitation in our area is a combination of scrubland and grassland (with an occasional cactus) and a scattering of mesquite trees - all producing a look similar to an African Savanna. In my opinion, SE Arizona has probably the best climate (aside from Southern California) in the entire continental US - with sufficient rainfall (most years anyway) and warm but not too hot temps.

Hope this helps you understand Arizona's geography and climate. It's not a complete picture but - at least in regards to Southern Arizona - it's a pretty accurate one.

Ken

PS - The lower humidity of the Southwest DOES make the heat a LOT more bearable than that found in the Midwest or the East Coast (I've lived in both) and certainly MUCH MUCH easier to handle than that of the South. The "It's a dry heat" that you hear all the time is REALLY TRUE. Mind you, some days WILL be uncomfortable (especially in the hotter parts of the state) but for the most part summer is a lot easier to handle than you would think.

Last edited by LordBalfor; 09-28-2010 at 09:53 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Tucson

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top