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Old 11-30-2010, 09:33 AM
 
41 posts, read 91,332 times
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We just moved here in the summer and have a very small plot of grass in our backyard. There is an irrigation system installed and we have it watering the grass once a day. We haven't had to mow it in a long time (at least 2-3 months). It's just staying one length and looks fine, a few brown spots but no big deal.

We are still thinking about whether or not to keep the grass or replace it with more of a natural desert setting. We decided to live with it for our first year here and then decide. One landscaper said you can't kill it unless you get the roots which could go as deep as 5 feet in the ground.

Anyway, our questions is does the grass needs to be watered over the winter months? Can we save some money by not watering for certain months?

Thanks!
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Old 11-30-2010, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Metro Phoenix, AZ USA
17,873 posts, read 40,965,635 times
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Five FEET? No grass roots go anywhere near that deep, even Bermuda, which I suspect is not the kind of grass we are talking about. Do you know what kind of grass it is?
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Old 11-30-2010, 03:12 PM
 
41 posts, read 91,332 times
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I think it's a type of Bermuda grass. When we asked him about how to kill the grass to put in desert landscaping he said it wouldn't die just by not watering it and it's the drought resistant grasses grow the deepest roots.
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Old 11-30-2010, 03:15 PM
 
41 posts, read 91,332 times
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I got this off of a horticulture web site: The frequency of irrigation is dependent on water use rate and soil type. Clay soils, for example, hold more water than sandy soils and, consequently, require less frequent irrigations. The depth of the rootzone also influences the frequency of irrigations. Bermudagrass roots can grow to a depth of six feet or more depending on soil profile characteristics. However, the majority of the root system, 80% or more, is found in the top 6 inches of soil. Where roots extend several feet into the soil, thorough and infrequent irrigation produces the most drought tolerant turf.
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Old 11-30-2010, 11:08 PM
 
Location: West of the Catalinas East of the Tortolitas
4,923 posts, read 8,082,024 times
Reputation: 8031
FWIW: Our condo complex has lots of grass and every October they completely stop watering it, let it go to where it's totally dry, brown and dead looking, then November 1, start watering twice a day until the next October. After looking dead, it responds and turns green again in about 5 days. The sprinklers run about 5 minutes at 5:00 a.m. and 5 p.m.
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Old 12-01-2010, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Oro Valley AZ.
1,024 posts, read 2,598,021 times
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Most grasses in the Tucson area are some sort of hybrid bermuda grass. There are exceptions of course. With bermuda grasses you have two options in the winter. It will naturally go dormant in Oct/Nov as the weather cools and turn brown once it freezes. You can let it stay dormant, give it one good last mowing, then forget about it till the spring. Or you can plant a winter grass, this is what many offices, condo complexes, golf courses etc. do to have green grass in the winter. It is referred to as "overseeding", the golf courses will close down for a couple of weeks while being overseeded, giving the new grass a chance to get established. So if you want a nice green lawn in the winter you need to overseed. If you want a break from the maintance and water bills, just let it stay dormant.

I previously had about 1200 aquare feet of grass in my backyard. I took it out about 5 years ago and converted to desert landscaping. I have had no problems with the grass coming back, so it can be done.
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