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Old 12-21-2019, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Cape Cod/Green Valley AZ
1,022 posts, read 2,351,020 times
Reputation: 2759

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My wife and I live in Green Valley. Not too far from us (35 miles or so), but about a century away in time, is the little town of Arivaca. Over the years we’ve visited the place, and have found the folks there friendly and hospitable. The funny thing is, when you mention Arivaca to the people who never visited the town you find they have the impression it’s still the “wild west” out there. Nothing but outlaws and, just maybe, “difficult” people.

Trust me, that ain’t the truth. There’s a diverse collection of souls that call the town their home. If I had to plant a title on them, I’d use the term “free-spirits.” Nobody bothers anybody, as far as I could tell.

Today we drove over to Arivaca for the Farmers Market, held there every Saturday. You head toAmado (another very small town), find Arivaca Road, and just drive (22 miles or so). Beautiful scenery, excellent road.

Arivaca is a small town, and the market is of a size to match. We first stopped off first at a little spot that sold pies and cakes. Found a nice pecan pie to take home. We were offered free coffee and a sample of the proprietor’s cake (yum!). Her husband works at the nearby Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, and she comes in from Alaska!

We meandered down the row of vendors, met a nice lady named Natasha, and purchased some of her wares. Also played with her dog. Gus-Gus (I think) was his name.

Breakfast was at the La Gitana Cantina, which, I have been told, is the oldest, continuously operating bar/cantina, in Arizona. I’ll take their word for that. Buddy of mine (WWII combat pilot, just passed away at 96), when he was a cowboy in the area (1945~1949) used to frequent the place. The way he described the ambiance then, the place was a bit more laid-back. Lots of broken glass on the floor sticks in my mind.

Breakfast there today was very pleasant, nice people, good food, rather inexpensive.

Below are a few photos of our day’s adventures. Enjoy.


Downtown...


Looking to one end of the town.


Wife checking out Gus-Gus. Trained attack dog (not...).


Where the elite meet in Arivaca!


The oldest bar, in the oldest ihabited townsite in AZ. OK, I'll buy it.


They run a nice clean town here!


Spouse about to saddle up!
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Old 12-22-2019, 09:29 AM
 
307 posts, read 168,196 times
Reputation: 919
Great photos, Rich! Thanks for sharing. I liked their 'Unwanted' sign in the window, that they run their town how they want it. Looks like you had nice weather and a wonderful day's outing.
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Old 12-22-2019, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Chemnitz, Germany previous in AZ, CA, AL, NJ,
3,397 posts, read 8,543,598 times
Reputation: 6170
I've been to Arivaca 3 or 4 times. It is a beautiful day trip from Tucson, Nogales or Green Valley. The first time I went there was with my mother and step father over 20 years ago when they were both still alive. We went to a bakery, which was probably the same place that you stopped at. There is a nice nature hiking trail just on the west side of town. My GF and I were there in April and it was her first visit to Arivaca. Very few people I know in Tucson have ever been there.

I would like to camp sometime in Arivaca. The thing I like about it is the almost complete silence because it is so far away from any busy highway or large city. The air is also pure and clean, and it is probably great for star gazing at night.
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Old 12-23-2019, 11:59 AM
 
Location: SW US
2,544 posts, read 2,386,363 times
Reputation: 4562
I went there several times when my parents were still active. At that time, 20+ years ago, the Wildlife Refuge had a really nice hiking trail we liked. We always stopped at the bakery too. But is it safe to even go to the Refuge now? Or to camp around there?
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Old 12-24-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Cape Cod/Green Valley AZ
1,022 posts, read 2,351,020 times
Reputation: 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I went there several times when my parents were still active. At that time, 20+ years ago, the Wildlife Refuge had a really nice hiking trail we liked. We always stopped at the bakery too. But is it safe to even go to the Refuge now? Or to camp around there?
Windwalker, I am unaware of any reason you should be concerned about visiting the Refuge or camping. Never heard anything that would indicate there would be any issues with visiting the area.

Rich
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Old 12-24-2019, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
7,594 posts, read 7,173,586 times
Reputation: 5354
Thanks for sharing that, RichCapeCod. That looks really appealing to me as a cool place to visit sometime. I love New Mexico and Arizona for traveling and exploring new places. We're exploring the Silver City area of New Mexico and I can't wait to go back and explore for ghost towns and such there.

But this Arivaca looks enchanting.
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Old 12-25-2019, 12:14 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,544 posts, read 2,386,363 times
Reputation: 4562
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichCapeCod View Post
Windwalker, I am unaware of any reason you should be concerned about visiting the Refuge or camping. Never heard anything that would indicate there would be any issues with visiting the area.

Rich

I'm really glad to hear that smugglers no longer pose a danger to people visiting the Refuge, if that is the case.
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Old 12-27-2019, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Seattle
3,063 posts, read 1,699,212 times
Reputation: 6039
Hello Rich! Good to see your posting and thanks for the pictures and text. My adventure posted here that included Arivaca (and the kind women at the Arivaca Mercantile) was so memorable for me. I'll be back down in March and will take that beautiful ride again.

Thanks again for your book, your appreciation for our Third Nation was big assist to my (eventual full time) relocation.
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Old 12-27-2019, 02:30 PM
 
2,410 posts, read 5,150,197 times
Reputation: 1893
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichCapeCod View Post

My wife and I live in Green Valley. Not too far from us (35 miles or so), but about a century away in time, is the little town of Arivaca. Over the years we’ve visited the place, and have found the folks there friendly and hospitable. The funny thing is, when you mention Arivaca to the people who never visited the town you find they have the impression it’s still the “wild west” out there. Nothing but outlaws and, just maybe, “difficult” people.

Trust me, that ain’t the truth. There’s a diverse collection of souls that call the town their home. If I had to plant a title on them, I’d use the term “free-spirits.” Nobody bothers anybody, as far as I could tell.

Today we drove over to Arivaca for the Farmers Market, held there every Saturday. You head toAmado (another very small town), find Arivaca Road, and just drive (22 miles or so). Beautiful scenery, excellent road.

Arivaca is a small town, and the market is of a size to match. We first stopped off first at a little spot that sold pies and cakes. Found a nice pecan pie to take home. We were offered free coffee and a sample of the proprietor’s cake (yum!). Her husband works at the nearby Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, and she comes in from Alaska!

We meandered down the row of vendors, met a nice lady named Natasha, and purchased some of her wares. Also played with her dog. Gus-Gus (I think) was his name.

Breakfast was at the La Gitana Cantina, which, I have been told, is the oldest, continuously operating bar/cantina, in Arizona. I’ll take their word for that. Buddy of mine (WWII combat pilot, just passed away at 96), when he was a cowboy in the area (1945~1949) used to frequent the place. The way he described the ambiance then, the place was a bit more laid-back. Lots of broken glass on the floor sticks in my mind.

Breakfast there today was very pleasant, nice people, good food, rather inexpensive.

Below are a few photos of our day’s adventures. Enjoy.


Downtown...


Looking to one end of the town.


Wife checking out Gus-Gus. Trained attack dog (not...).


Where the elite meet in Arivaca!


The oldest bar, in the oldest ihabited townsite in AZ. OK, I'll buy it.


They run a nice clean town here!


Spouse about to saddle up!
Really nice photos! What was the temp? I see people in parkas! I'm in Michigan (heatwave at the moment, 40 degrees), but wondering about wearing parkas in southern AZ. Looks like a really nice day and lots of sun!

BTW, how did you load your photos to C-D? Can they reside on your computer?
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Old 01-07-2020, 04:39 PM
 
61 posts, read 53,496 times
Reputation: 181
Default Should be very safe

we go every winter when we're out there and the last couple times my husband & I were amazed at the sheer number of border patrol vehicles. That whole area southwest of Green Valley down to the border is very scenic and quiet. We especially like to take Ruby Rd from Rio Rico out to Pena Blanca Lake and the various hiking trails like Sycamore Canyon. Although very near the border we've never seen anyone but border patrol although we have seen water jugs a few times. It's not a highly publicized area and I only really learned about it from Forest Service resources. I always try to find forest service roads wherever we go as they often provide good access to more remote places.

This is a forest service map of the area

[IMG][/IMG]

and a link to the forest service site
https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/coro...5800&actid=105

I think people who never visit southern AZ are the most concerned about the danger from illegal immigrants. We've hiked for years all around the border areas on our numerous visits and have never seen one. Not saying there aren't any, more that they don't seem interested in making themselves known. I'm a female who often hikes alone and I've never been uncomfortable. And, yes, the trails at Buenos Aires are very nice. Last time we were there last Feb the only other person around was the visitor center worker.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I went there several times when my parents were still active. At that time, 20+ years ago, the Wildlife Refuge had a really nice hiking trail we liked. We always stopped at the bakery too. But is it safe to even go to the Refuge now? Or to camp around there?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
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