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Old 03-20-2010, 04:09 PM
 
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Growing up in tucson i never really got used to the hot weather. It was bearable but not liveable. Luckily I have a houseboat off of clarion island mexico. It feels so good having a cool ocean breeze hitting me instead of the dry desert oven. Though the beauty of tucson makes living in tucson bearable.
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Old 03-21-2010, 11:42 PM
 
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Hi,

In Tucson the weather is nice except for when the monsoon rains come in July and August. It becomes as humid as Miami but hotter and people can expire like in jungle heat. Refrigerated Air Conditioning is a must because evap coolers stop working very well.

Dennis in Tucson
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Old 03-21-2010, 11:59 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Originally Posted by DENLEM View Post
Hi,

In Tucson the weather is nice except for when the monsoon rains come in July and August. It becomes as humid as Miami but hotter and people can expire like in jungle heat. Refrigerated Air Conditioning is a must because evap coolers stop working very well.

Dennis in Tucson
Sorry, but other than for VERY BRIEF and INFREQUENT periods, even in July and August Tucson is not ANYWHERE NEAR as humid as Miami. It's not even close.

Ken
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Old 03-22-2010, 03:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Sorry, but other than for VERY BRIEF and INFREQUENT periods, even in July and August Tucson is not ANYWHERE NEAR as humid as Miami. It's not even close. Ken
His statement is generally correct. Official monsoon season accompanied by higher humidities starts late June and ends early Sept. While there are stretches of dryer, hotter weather interspersed within the season, to characterize a typical monsoon season as very brief and infrequent is *not* correct.

Humidities don't get close to Miami standards however the temperatures are typically hotter making the discomfort index similar. One look at the typical overnight low temps is a dead giveaway.
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Old 03-22-2010, 03:21 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
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Originally Posted by actinic View Post
to characterize a typical monsoon season as very brief and infrequent is *not* correct.
But that isn't what he did. He didn't say that the whole of the monsoon season was brief, but only that the episodic periods of higher humidity during that season are not long lasting. I would agree. The commonest kind of weather during the so-called "monsoon season" is one wherein laundry hung outdoors will be dry inside of half an hour. Morning laundry hung outside in the summer in Miami is still damp at sunset.
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Old 03-22-2010, 03:32 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Originally Posted by actinic View Post
His statement is generally correct. Official monsoon season accompanied by higher humidities starts late June and ends early Sept. While there are stretches of dryer, hotter weather interspersed within the season, to characterize a typical monsoon season as very brief and infrequent is *not* correct.

Humidities don't get close to Miami standards however the temperatures are typically hotter making the discomfort index similar. One look at the typical overnight low temps is a dead giveaway.
I didn't disagree with the part about higher humidities during the monsoon season, I disagreed with the stated fact that the typical humidities were similar to the typical humidities in Miami - a statement that simply NOT true. Humidity in Tucson CAN reach the same humidities found in Miami. The difference is that those high humidity levels in Tucson generally only occur just as very brief spikes just prior the arrival of a thunderstorm - and then only for very brief periods of time (perhaps just a few hours - often a LOT less than that), whereas in Miami those high levels of humidity are often the norm throughout most of the day pretty much ALL the time. That's a BIG difference.

Regarding overnight lows - well, sorry, but summer overnight lows in Miami are virtually IDENTICAL to summer overnight lows in Tucson. In fact July IS identical. June lows in Miami and August are slightly WARMER than the Tucson lows for those months - and Miami will have MUCH higher nighttime humidity levels than Tucson (one needs only consider that Miami gets 3 to 4 times the amount of rain during those months than Tucson gets)

Sorry, but Miami is MUCH more uncomfortable much more often than Tucson is. Tucson may get humid once and a while, but Miami is humid pretty much ALL the time.

Climatology Comparison for Tucson, AZ - weather.com

Ken

Last edited by LordBalfor; 03-22-2010 at 03:43 PM..
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Old 03-22-2010, 03:41 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Originally Posted by Brenda-by-the-sea View Post
But that isn't what he did. He didn't say that the whole of the monsoon season was brief, but only that the episodic periods of higher humidity during that season are not long lasting. I would agree. The commonest kind of weather during the so-called "monsoon season" is one wherein laundry hung outdoors will be dry inside of half an hour. Morning laundry hung outside in the summer in Miami is still damp at sunset.

Yup. That's exactly right.
The Monsoon Season in Tucson is STILL mostly hot and dry - with occasional afternoon and evening thunderstorms (that bring relief actually). It's NOT characterized by more or less constant high humidity the way the Gulf Coast is. Generally even during the Monsoon Season, humidity in Tucson is usually relatively low. It spikes a few times a week as thunderstorms approach if there is an "active" Monsoon Season - or even less if it's a relatively dry Monsoon Season - but it is NEVER a case of the constant high humidity levels Florida is so known for.

Ken
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Old 03-22-2010, 04:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Brenda-by-the-sea View Post
But that isn't what he did. He didn't say that the whole of the monsoon season was brief, but only that the episodic periods of higher humidity during that season are not long lasting. I would agree. The commonest kind of weather during the so-called "monsoon season" is one wherein laundry hung outdoors will be dry inside of half an hour. Morning laundry hung outside in the summer in Miami is still damp at sunset.
You are incorrect. The 'episodic periods' even without the rain & storms can last for a a considerable period, sometimes weeks. When it rains of course humidiites are even higher but certainly not Miami levels. Thank goodness, the hot temperatures even with a slight bump in humidity is quite noticeable, and to many quite uncomfortable.

I lived there for a number of years. You?
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Old 03-22-2010, 04:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
I didn't disagree with the part about higher humidities during the monsoon season, I disagreed with the stated fact that the typical humidities were similar to the typical humidities in Miami - a statement that simply NOT true. Humidity in Tucson CAN reach the same humidities found in Miami. The difference is that those high humidity levels in Tucson generally only occur just as very brief spikes just prior the arrival of a thunderstorm - and then only for very brief periods of time (perhaps just a few hours - often a LOT less than that), whereas in Miami those high levels of humidity are often the norm throughout most of the day pretty much ALL the time. That's a BIG difference.

Regarding overnight lows - well, sorry, but summer overnight lows in Miami are virtually IDENTICAL to summer overnight lows in Tucson. In fact July IS identical. June lows in Miami and August are slightly WARMER than the Tucson lows for those months - and Miami will have MUCH higher nighttime humidity levels than Tucson (one needs only consider that Miami gets 3 to 4 times the amount of rain during those months than Tucson gets)

Sorry, but Miami is MUCH more uncomfortable much more often than Tucson is. Tucson may get humid once and a while, but Miami is humid pretty much ALL the time.

Climatology Comparison for Tucson, AZ - weather.com Ken
No disagreement about humidities, Miami certainly trumps Tucson. No disagreement with the 'spikes' either, however humidities remain at elevated, non spiked levels for considerable length.

The fact overnight lows in Tucson approximates Miami's during the summer reinforces the presence of these higher, non spiked humidities, and for extended periods.

No question about Miami's virtually continuous humidities, however the temps don't hit Tucson's extremes. I'm sure this is a down side to the heat lovers who live in Tucson who complain about temps getting below 70 ... a bit of humidity would probably keep them within their comfort level.
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Old 03-22-2010, 04:36 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Originally Posted by actinic View Post
You are incorrect. The 'episodic periods' even without the rain & storms can last for a a considerable period, sometimes weeks. When it rains of course humidiites are even higher but certainly not Miami levels. Thank goodness, the hot temperatures even with a slight bump in humidity is quite noticeable, and to many quite uncomfortable.

I lived there for a number of years. You?
I don't care how many years you've lived there. You are clearly not very observant - or more likely you have nothing else to compare Tucson to. You certainly aren't able to accurately compare Tucson to Miami.

Tucson average humidity in August (the most humid month) is 65 in the morning and 33 in the afternoon.
Miami average humidity in August is 85 in the morning and 65 in the afternoon. In other words, even the time of day with the LOWEST level of humidity in Miami is comparable to the time of day with the HIGHEST level of humidity in Tucson.
In fact, EVERY SINGLE MONTH in Miami has higher afternoon levels of humidity than Tucson does for ANY MONTH OF THE YEAR.
That's a huge difference.

Average Relative Humidity(%)

I don't care how uncomfortable it is to YOU - that's entirely subjectively, the fact is the stats don't lie and the stats CLEARLY point out that humidity levels in Tucson are not ANYWHERE NEAR the humidity levels in Miami - PERIOD.
Yes, it does indeed SPIKE to high levels of humidity in Tucson during the Monsoons - but if those SPIKES were all that common it would be reflected in the AVERAGE humidity readings, and the fact is this is no such reflection - for the simple reason that those SPIKES are few and far between compared to Miami.

Just compare the city-data charts for yourself. It couldn't be more obvious.

//www.city-data.com/city/Miami-Florida.html
//www.city-data.com/city/Tucson-Arizona.html

Ken
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