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Old 09-08-2011, 02:58 PM
 
1,831 posts, read 2,196,314 times
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There are a ton of different Marriott hotels in Tulsa. There’s a big one at 71st and Lewis, and another downtown. Most single people without kids prefer to live downtown or in the midtown area and both those hotels are close by. Midtown also has Riverparks which is the center of Tulsa’s trail system. Jenks is right across the river from Riverparks and is very connected to the trail system but is mostly a bedroom community for families. It could be kinda boring for you. Broken Arrow is a city in its own right with over 100k people and it is connected to the trail system but it’s just not as pretty as Tulsa and it also isn’t going to have a whole lot of single people either.

Traffic isn’t bad at all in Tulsa except in the Southeast area bordering Broken Arrow. This is an area with a lot of hotels though. Traffic can be bad in other areas, but usually only generally when there is construction.
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:17 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,542 posts, read 9,434,510 times
Reputation: 3296
Quote:
Originally Posted by swake View Post
My family has lived in the Tulsa area going back 100 years. My grandparents lived at 36th and Utica when 36th Street was a dirt road. I don’t just visit the area a few times a year, I’m here every day. And most everyone who lives here considers Tulsa a Midwestern city. When Tulsa is described on the news, we are the Midwest. Especially by the local news. It’s surprising to me that you act so shocked about this. It’s not just common, it’s a large majority. And I would not consider Oklahoma City southern either. OKC is more Southwestern than Midwestern but Southwestern has no negative “hick” stereotype that I know of. It’s no insult to connect Oklahoma City to booming Southwestern Cities like Dallas, Austin, Phoenix or Denver.
Large majority? Laughable and nonsensical. Everyone that lives there? = most everyone you know?

You and your fam are more than welcome to call Tulsa part of the Arctic Circle....doesn't make it so when the Census and every other major regional map has always included ALL (cities too) of the Indian Nations as a state within the overarching Southern region. Last time I checked Tulsa was within OkieVille's border.

Check it here: File:US Census geographical region map.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Also you purport very flawed logic. OK City is a Southwestern city and somehow Tulsa, a little over a 100 miles from OKC within state borders, is a Midwestern city? Strange, and again, not rational in the least. I would assert that Tulsa is culturally whatever you think OK City is.....again, you're not consistent here which makes no sense.

You do realize that by calling Tulsa a Midwestern city you are claiming it is the southernmost Midwestern city in the nation in a state that is always including in the South on respected regional maps?.....Much further geographically south than any other city of the Midwest. Again, nonsensical. I think many young people forget that Oklahoma's northernmost boundary is parallel to North Carolina's northernmost boundary. So, we should call Raleigh/Durham part of the Northeast now?! Or why don't we go ahead and call north Arkansas part of the Midwest now too?! See how far off your geographical designation is for Tulsa?

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 09-08-2011 at 10:39 PM..
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:22 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,542 posts, read 9,434,510 times
Reputation: 3296
Also, you might benefit from this article:

CHAPEL HILL – Ask even educated Americans what states form "the South," and you’re likely to get 100 different answers. Almost everyone will agree on Deep South states -- except maybe Florida -- but which border states belong and which don’t can be endlessly debated.

Now, the Southern Focus Poll, conducted by the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides strong support for including such states as Texas, Kentucky and Oklahoma in the South. On the other hand, West Virginia, Maryland, Missouri, Delaware and the District of Columbia don’t belong anymore, if they ever did.

Fourteen polls, surveying a total of more than 17,000 people between 1992 and 1999 show, for example, that only 7 percent of D.C. residents responding say that they live in the South. Only 14 percent of Delaware residents think they live in the region, followed by Missourians with 23 percent, Marylanders with 40 percent and West Virginians with 45 percent.

"We found 84 percent of Texans, 82 percent of Virginians, 79 percent of Kentuckians and 69 percent of Oklahomans say they live in the South," says Dr. John Shelton Reed, director of the institute. "Our findings correspond to the traditional 13-state South as defined by the Gallup organization and others, but is different from the Census Bureau’s South, which doesn’t make sense."

The U.S. Census Bureau includes Delaware, D.C., Maryland and West Virginia in its definition. "Clearly some parts of Texas aren’t Southern – whatever you mean by that -- and some parts of Maryland are," Reed said. "But sometimes you need to say what ‘the Southern states’ are, and this kind of information can help you decide. Our next step is to look inside individual states like Texas, break the data down by county, and say, for example, where between Beaumont and El Paso people stop telling you that you’re in the South."

A report on the findings, produced by UNC-CH’s Institute for Research in Social Science, will appear in the June issue of the journal "Southern Cultures." Reed, who directs the institute, says the results should interest many people including survey, marketing and census researchers. "Personally, I think they ought to be interesting too to ordinary folk who are curious about where people stop telling you you’re in the South as you’re travelling west or north," he said. "Where that is has been kind of hard to say sometimes."

Perhaps surprisingly, 11 percent of people in Utah, 10 percent in Indiana and slighter fewer people in Illinois, Ohio, Arizona and Michigan claim to be Southerners. "That’s because in the early part of this century millions of people left the South, and their migration was one of the great migrations not just in American history, but in world history," Reed said. "Their children may not think of themselves as Southern, but they still do." The UNC-CH sociologist said he was surprised that 51 percent of Floridians describe themselves as Southerners even though 90 percent know their community is in the South. "Florida is the only state in lower 48 where most people living there weren’t born there," he said. "In fact, most of them weren’t born in the South, much less in Florida."

Because of the South’s growing economy, only between 90 and 80 percent of residents of Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, Georgia and the Carolinas said they are Southerners, the surveys showed. "If you want to define the South as where people say it is, now we have a better sense of it," Reed said. "For the most part, it confirms what I already suspected, which is why I’m glad to see it. This work shows something we wanted to show, but haven’t been able to before."

(UNC-CH surveys reveal where the ‘real’ South lies)

Going against authentic research still?

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 09-08-2011 at 10:37 PM..
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:31 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,542 posts, read 9,434,510 times
Reputation: 3296
Perhaps a history lesson?

Much of what we know of Oklahoma today was actually "Arkansaw Territory." Yep, I hate to admit it, but Oklahoma's roots are thoroughly Southern. This is really just to remind you of the geographic affinity between Western South Central states.....it's been there from very early. Geography and region, of course, are key contributors to culture.

Missouri Compromise anyone? Just google it for an image map.

I guess the Tulsa area isn't the epicenter of Midwestern culture that you claim? Something to think about.

Sorry to bombard you with all these posts.....just wanted to show you some legitimate evidence (not mere opinion, although our experiences are important, don't get me wrong) that might help you reconsider your mis-designation when it comes to Tulsa.

At the end of the day, you're absolutely free to think whatever you want about Tulsa and Oklahoma. But just so you know, you're bucking generally accepted regional norms/classifications backed up by historically relevant and time-tested true data.

Cheers.

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 09-08-2011 at 10:56 PM..
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
7,525 posts, read 16,906,746 times
Reputation: 7110
So where's the evidence we aren't from the Arctic Circle?
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Old 09-08-2011, 11:11 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,542 posts, read 9,434,510 times
Reputation: 3296
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodpasture View Post
so where's the evidence we aren't from the arctic circle?
Doh! :-)
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Old 09-09-2011, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Brooksville Florida
100 posts, read 212,305 times
Reputation: 86
Are we not South of the Mason Dixon line? End of discussion.
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Old 09-09-2011, 07:14 AM
 
16,433 posts, read 22,102,049 times
Reputation: 9622
One question to ask: how do you feel about tornados?
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Old 09-09-2011, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
7,525 posts, read 16,906,746 times
Reputation: 7110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
One question to ask: how do you feel about tornados?
I think they are mostly a midwestern thing..........
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Jenks, Oklahoma
620 posts, read 1,743,327 times
Reputation: 533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post

Sorry to bombard you with all these posts....
Are you truly sorry? I remember you and others beat this dead horse at least once before.
I can't believe you guys really care about this.
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