U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
 [Register]
U.S. Territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, etc.
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2010, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 980,902 times
Reputation: 257

Advertisements

Not really (in my opinion).

I can walk up to anyone on the train, talk about stuff.

But offensive confrontations can still happen day-in and day-out. The aggressors are usually the first people I classify as threats. Everyone is the same, until they disrespect.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-25-2010, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
353 posts, read 968,287 times
Reputation: 174
That's not respect username3, that's fear. LOL However, you're right, people usually keep to themselves while on the street. You never know who might take offense on the littlest thing and shot you.

As davsot said, I think that with some practice you can actually make out those who are more prone to pose problems or snap at you just because.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2010, 08:17 PM
 
86 posts, read 449,939 times
Reputation: 53
Thanks for the great replies everyone! I was originally going down there with native PRans, but who are not familiar with any of the seedier areas. Now, due to extenuating circumstances, I will be going down alone. I guess I will have to exercise some more caution...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 11:31 AM
 
3,206 posts, read 3,606,299 times
Reputation: 4801
I returned from PR Wednesday morning. Although I had a great time with my friends, the truth is that things in PR are not good. Mind you, I was there in January of this year. Since then, there seems to have been a major downward spiraling in many sectors of society.

I've covered the waste management dilemma enough to require no further mentioning. However, theft, murders, unemployment, drug use, alcohol & tabacco consumption seem to have increased exponentially. Without fail, everyone I sustained a conversation with had a crime story to tell. Saddest of all was the story of my 70 year old aunt. She told me how, on more than one ocassion, she crawled on her knees from her bedroom to the hallway to avoid getting hit by a stray bullet during yet another shootout outside her rural community house.

All these negative factors have made people visibly and audibly on edge. You can see it in people's faces and hear it in their voice. Common courtesy appears to be an antiquated formality practiced only by society's seniors. Many male youths seem to aspire involvement in "el bichotismo." What is "bichotismo?" That's an exclusive term for those wishing to be future neighborhood "bichotes." What's a "bichote?" It derives from the word "big shot."

What strikes me most is the fact that people have become so accustomed to crime that it's an acceptable part of everyday life. Crime isn't unusual to them. For example, waking up in the morning and not having phone service because someone stole the copper wiring the night before is business as usual. "No biggie; it happens," people say.

While I was there, I realized that I felt like a stranger in my birthplace. This was no longer the island whose beach roads I once confidently jogged upon, nor was it the place where I went out on foot at night for a drink with friends. This is a different place with people of a different mindset. This is. . .the new Puerto Rico.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 980,902 times
Reputation: 257
Hmm, yes that may be the case in some places, but it is not where I live in.

Yes, I believe that is happening, but no need to go so far and say... "the new Puerto Rico". :lol:

I get your point, though.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 02:14 PM
 
3,206 posts, read 3,606,299 times
Reputation: 4801
Quote:
Originally Posted by davsot View Post
Hmm, yes that may be the case in some places, but it is not where I live in.

Yes, I believe that is happening, but no need to go so far and say... "the new Puerto Rico". :lol:

I get your point, though.
I'm glad you posted this response. I've noticed that many people in PR seem to be unaware as to how bad things really are. I realize it's all relevant. But PR does appear to be crime ridden to those of us living outside the island. Maybe you live within a gated community whereby you're relatively free from what many people are exposed to.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 03:05 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,801 posts, read 9,068,891 times
Reputation: 7327
It's an undeniable fact that Puerto Rico has the highest crime rate of any state or territory in the nation. They also have one of the highest poverty rates but I believe either the Northern Mariana Islands or American Samoa take 1st place in that category.

Puerto Rico has the highest ratio of police officers to civilians in the nation, yet they have the highest crime rate as well. I think the corruption within the PRPD and the various municipal police forces plays a role as well. I know the Puerto Ricans arent going to like this, but we need to replace the Puerto Rican held upper ranks (any officer above the rank of Captain) with mainland Americans. This will massively reduce corruption.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,411 posts, read 2,342,807 times
Reputation: 1677
Cops probably make, what, $15,000 a year starting off in PR? How would we expect them to act? I think corruption runs from top to bottom. I was in Rincon in January and people were talking about this sergeant who was on a "fishing trip" on the Mona Passage and was found by the Coast Guard with a duffel bag full of cash and no fishing poles. As long as mainlanders want cocaine then Dominican crime rings will be sending it through PR. There's not much that can be done. And with the economy probably being twice as worse in PR than on the mainland, things are pretty grim right now. Im moving to San German which is supposed to be pretty peaceful, but that doesn't mean I won't lock my doors
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 980,902 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
I'm glad you posted this response. I've noticed that many people in PR seem to be unaware as to how bad things really are. I realize it's all relevant. But PR does appear to be crime ridden to those of us living outside the island. Maybe you live within a gated community whereby you're relatively free from what many people are exposed to.
Chacho how can you say that, you know where I live! I told you the other day.

I live in what I like to describe as a humble fishing village. It is a very safe community and it is not gated. Most people would call it ghetto, but I am glad to call this my home. And you were here a few days ago. You know there is no crime here.

Why don't you just say where your aunt lives instead of making assumptions.

Places that look ghetto but are actually pretty tame:

Downtown Santurce, Miramar, Puerta de Tierra, Río Piedras, my community of Cerro Gordo, where I have lived all my life.

Gosh! It sucks when you grow up in such a safe place in PR. Then you get this positive perception towards the whole Island. You start to believe everyone hear is humble and giving and united. Alas, such is not the case, but we aren't all like the evil side of PR.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 08:01 PM
 
1,821 posts, read 4,182,253 times
Reputation: 4911
The problem with Puerto Rico is that you're unable to insulate yourself from the blight and the violence.

In an island of 100x35 miles, it is simply impossible to go about your day without being exposed to potentially lethal situations. You can't be young and able to socialize at the outlets available in the island, as it simply peppered with a whole demographic of people involved in the drug trade, or dependent on government assitance. As such, violence breaks out in places considered mainstream, and you become collateral damage. I find that too high a price to pay for the benefit of having 85 degree weather all year, which is why I left. My social life while growing up was non-existent; it wasn't worth it risking a confrontation with somebody with no sense or nothing to lose. I visit the folks a couple times a year, and I simply stay home or go catch up with friends at their residence; but I neveer socialize at pubs or otherwise. I feel bad for those I left behind, they have no choice but to chance it. Forget that.

Cut someone off in traffic? Wildcard. Look someone the wrong way or bump him at the pub/bar? Wildcard. Stop at a light day or night next to another vehicle? Wildcard. This is all borne out of economic blight. When the majority have little to look forward to, violence and mediocrity is accepted as the opportunity cost of "living in paradise". It's a self-sustaining misery. In the absence of an emerging economic engine to change the face of the island it will simply remain a wonderful place to visit and a terrible place to live or set foot on for more than a week. The best thing PRicans got going for them is that blue passport that allows them a legal avenue to escape that misery. Many Dominicans, Cubans et al simply don't have that legal avenue. In that regard, Puerto Ricans deserve every little bit of the misery they tolerate daily....
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top