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Old 08-29-2010, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 995,356 times
Reputation: 257

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I wish every part of Puerto Rico was like that. Then I wouldn't get this urge to question the comment.

Hehe, the US is suffering from this too, though economic blight.

Remember the pickup driving on the airport? the terrorist who ran a plane into the IRS? Gang wars on the border?

That all sounds like it is mainstream to me.

@WIHS: When you say the fact is undeniable, can you maybe JUST MAYBE show some proof?
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:01 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
1,473 posts, read 2,446,832 times
Reputation: 1814
^ Troll much???
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Old 07-01-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: The Bay
6,915 posts, read 13,367,167 times
Reputation: 3093
Quote:
Originally Posted by username3 View Post
it may sound sick, but i like the crime and violence because it creates a mutual respect for everyone you dont know and they respect you cause no one knows who is a murderer or criminal and who is not. and its not like the states where obviously a white guy is definetly not going to shoot you, here theres no give away whatsoever in terms of appearance on whos packin heat and ready to shoot. so theres a lot more respect here to one another than in the states, a lot more. get it? anyone feel the same? no one messes with anyone, and if they do, its rare and limited. in the states i notices a lot of stuff going around the ppl here would never ever put up with.

Uh... I don't know where to start with this one.
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Old 07-01-2011, 10:44 AM
 
Location: The Bay
6,915 posts, read 13,367,167 times
Reputation: 3093
Anyway, I know this thread is old but since the OP asked for pictures, here's a set I took in La Perla:


La Perla, Old San Juan PR - SkyscraperPage Forum
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Old 07-03-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 995,356 times
Reputation: 257
Wow great photos. That place got raided a few days ago.
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Old 07-04-2011, 01:32 PM
 
2 posts, read 4,278 times
Reputation: 15
Whoever said that walking through most housing projects in Puerto Rico is safe--um, where did you get that info from? I live in Puerto Rico, and I would NEVER give someone the impression that going into a "caserio" AKA project is safe. Especially not a white guy who said that he now has to go alone and will be taking pictures!!!!! Seriously dude, do not even THINK about taking pictures of people who remotely look like they might have anything to do with underground stuff. And don't even THINK about taking even your cell phone out of your pocket to make a phone call if you are brave enough to go into the projects. Please. They do NOT tolerate that at all, and they will turn you into swiss cheese in a second.

I agree that Llorens Torres is one of the worst caserios. La Perla is HORRIBLE, but they are forcing everyone out of there in order to turn it into a tourist site. They just cut off the lights and water to La Perla a few days ago in order to force people to leave.

Anyway, I live in Gurabo, and it is going downhill fast. Drug dealing is huge, even though my town is kinda out in the country. However, I would never tell you to go to the caserios in my town, especially not alone and with the agenda you have. I heard a guy get shot to death about a month and a half ago right on the other street and I live in a "good" neighborhood.

While I do appreciate what you're doing, I will just tell you to be careful. Like someone said about looking at people wrong in a pub/club and getting a beat down, it's true. Puerto Ricans have VERY bad tempers, let me tell you. It is extremely easy to set somebody off here. The island is gorgeous, but unfortunately crime has taken over. And the person who said 3 murders a day is about correct. It isn't two, that's way too low.
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Old 07-22-2011, 12:33 PM
 
199 posts, read 323,587 times
Reputation: 234
I lived in P.R. for 26 years, during which time I went through college, married and bought a house. Although I did comparatively well for my situation, I must say that Puerto Rico has never been a place where those with less than rock-solid character can prosper. Anything that you could do to get ahead in the 'states was three times as hard to do in P.R. That tends to either make folks more resolute or to make them bitter and cynical. From firsthand experience I can say that all this has been caused by a combination of perennial substandard government leadership who's main concern lay more with personal gain than it's constituency and the socioeconomical isolationism that comes from being a second-class citizen on an island. Both the incredible degree of unemployment and the high crime rate that we see today have come to pass because Puerto Rican politicians HAVE NOT DONE THEIR JOB for the last 40 years. They have been seeing the growing trends and red flags brought about by self-serving and ministerial lassitude for a long time, yet they have been pushing partisan and personal agendas to the detriment of industry and education in Puerto Rico, for the longest time. Yet only NOW has the U.S. State Department started intervenening in P.R. to the same degree that they would in the face of similar fiscal and management transgressions in a state. Many Puerto Ricans who have neither the monetary nor linguistic resources to leave the island, have adopted an attitude of seething anger, expediency and desperation, as they have nowhere near the mobility that U.S. citizens have in the lower 48. Yet this scenario is not unique to this point in time or P.R., the same was true of mid-19th century New York, the Reconstruction South, the Dustbowl Midwest and minority neighborhoods in the U.S. before the Civil Rights Act of 1964. To those folks in Middle America who seem smug and judgmental about the Puerto Rican plight, be careful who you trust to run your government, and who holds your money while you sleep, because where Puerto Rico is, you may soon be.
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Old 07-23-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
3,486 posts, read 4,251,008 times
Reputation: 7184
expatriado....Excellent post, thanks for sharing.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 11-13-2011, 12:40 PM
 
Location: New England
1 posts, read 2,836 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by davsot View Post
Hmm, yes that may be the case in some places, but it is not where I live in.

Yes, I believe that is happening, but no need to go so far and say... "the new Puerto Rico". :lol:

I get your point, though.
I agree that it depends on where you live. I have been there twice a month for the last 6 months and now have decided to move there with my wife and child.
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Old 11-13-2011, 03:14 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,801 posts, read 9,212,394 times
Reputation: 7340
Quote:
Originally Posted by expatriado View Post
I lived in P.R. for 26 years, during which time I went through college, married and bought a house. Although I did comparatively well for my situation, I must say that Puerto Rico has never been a place where those with less than rock-solid character can prosper. Anything that you could do to get ahead in the 'states was three times as hard to do in P.R. That tends to either make folks more resolute or to make them bitter and cynical. From firsthand experience I can say that all this has been caused by a combination of perennial substandard government leadership who's main concern lay more with personal gain than it's constituency and the socioeconomical isolationism that comes from being a second-class citizen on an island. Both the incredible degree of unemployment and the high crime rate that we see today have come to pass because Puerto Rican politicians HAVE NOT DONE THEIR JOB for the last 40 years. They have been seeing the growing trends and red flags brought about by self-serving and ministerial lassitude for a long time, yet they have been pushing partisan and personal agendas to the detriment of industry and education in Puerto Rico, for the longest time. Yet only NOW has the U.S. State Department started intervenening in P.R. to the same degree that they would in the face of similar fiscal and management transgressions in a state. Many Puerto Ricans who have neither the monetary nor linguistic resources to leave the island, have adopted an attitude of seething anger, expediency and desperation, as they have nowhere near the mobility that U.S. citizens have in the lower 48. Yet this scenario is not unique to this point in time or P.R., the same was true of mid-19th century New York, the Reconstruction South, the Dustbowl Midwest and minority neighborhoods in the U.S. before the Civil Rights Act of 1964. To those folks in Middle America who seem smug and judgmental about the Puerto Rican plight, be careful who you trust to run your government, and who holds your money while you sleep, because where Puerto Rico is, you may soon be.
Puerto Ricans don't have the mobility that mainlanders have not because they are Puerto Rican, but because many Puerto Ricans (especially the older generations) do not speak English either at all or they only know a few basic words and phrases. Ir's pretty obvious to me that the younger generation is much more fluent in English, almost to the point where except for the accent I would have guessed it was their first language. They should also be encouraged to seek higher education on the mainland.
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