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Old 06-28-2013, 09:26 AM
 
252 posts, read 566,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
It may not even all be racism. There are some studies that show that even in societies that were never colonized people do prefer lighter skin people as mates. It could be human nature in the same way that many studies show that newly born babies stare at good looking people for much longer than they do the not so good looking.
Any there are studies that show otherwise as well. There is clear evident of the effects of White supremacy on people with melanin. Objective attractiveness has nothing to do with skin color.





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Old 06-28-2013, 03:19 PM
Status: "177th Anniversary of Freedom!" (set 5 days ago)
 
6,726 posts, read 9,458,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phillystress215 View Post
Any there are studies that show otherwise as well. There is clear evident of the effects of White supremacy on people with melanin. Objective attractiveness has nothing to do with skin color.
I couldn't find the exact study I was referring to, but this is basically what it said:

Quote:
It has long been noted that black men prefer lighter-skinned women, both in sub-Saharan Africa and in the black diaspora. For the United States, we can quote several writers. "A fair Negro woman … has such superior marriage chances that this fact is generally recognized as the major explanation of why passable women do not seem to pass out of the Negro caste as often as do passable men" (Myrdal 1944: 698). "The frequency with which Negro men choose women fairer than they are attests at least in part to the connection in the mind of the black man between fair skin and beauty" (Grier and Cobbs 1968:80). "Several research projects conducted in the last few years suggest that African-American men are more attracted to women who are lighter than they are, and that African-American women believe light skin makes them, or would make them, more appealing" (Layng 2006).
Quote:
This preference is often put down to European influence. Myrdal (1944:697), for instance, felt that African-Americans were internalizing Euro-American color prejudice. Others, like Layng (2006), simply see an adoption of dominant norms of beauty: "it was the Europeans and their descendants who were both numerically and economically dominant. so it is not surprising that, over time, a greater number of African-Americans, especially those who were upwardly mobile, adopted the prevailing views on physical attractiveness."
Quote:
There is evidence, however, that this aesthetic preference is native to Africa. Ardener (1954) found it to be widespread among the Ibo of Nigeria, including generations born before the colonial period. In a survey of the Human Relations Area Files, van den Berghe and Frost (1986) noted a consistent cross-cultural preference for lighter skin in women but not in men. Sub-Saharan Africa is no exception, as shown by these extracts from the ethnographic literature:

Bambara (Mali) -
The Bambara are not unmoved by the beauty of a woman's form; they can distinguish a well-formed body from a malformed one, a pretty woman from an ugly one, and they find a coppery skin more attractive than one of ebony black. (Henry 1910:217)

Tallensi (Ghana) -
In skin colour they vary from black through chocolate brown to bronze, which the natives call "red" (bon-ze'e) and regard as the most attractive bodily hue. (Fortes 1945:7)

Hausa (Nigeria) -
Light skin colour, referred to as "red", ranks high in the Hausa criteria of beauty; many variations of colour, from black to a very light reddish brown are seen. (Smith 1965:264)

Ibo (Nigeria) -
In Ibo culture, however, these yellowish or reddish complexions are considered more beautiful than the darker, ‘blacker,’ complexions. ... It is true that, in West Africa, government has for many years been identified with pale-skinned Europeans, but the Ibo evidence suggests that preference for paleness of complexion is indigenous. (Ardener 1954:71-72)

Azande (Sudan) –
Of the women and girls, some with babies, he kept the most beautiful in Zande eyes, those brightest of eye and clearest of skin and with full breasts, for his couch. (Evans-Pritchard 1937:60)

Berti (Sudan)
Men and women affirm without any hesitation that men are black, hot and hard and women are white, cold and soft. (Holy 1988:471)

Somali (Somalia) -
Men appreciate women of good height and stature, with good hips and breasts, and plump but not fat. A reddish tinged skin is thought highly of in preference to a dark dull black. (Lewis 1962:13)

Masai (Kenya, Tanzania) -
Further requirements for being regarded as beautiful are an oval face, white teeth, black gums, a skin color as light as possible ... (Merker 1910:18)

Rundi (Rwanda, Burundi) –
Beauty does not count very heavily, but a man is not displeased if people notice that his wife is attractive and well-fleshed, has a long and narrow nose, a light skin, and is somewhat like a cow. (Albert 1963:203)

Ganda (Uganda) -
There is, in respect of the ordinary negroid complexion, a preference for paleness deeply rooted in the Ganda ideal of beauty. ... The Ganda concept of skin pigmentation considers light coloured complexions to be differing shades of white. A dark brown skin colour is said to be — eruyeru, that is, somewhat white. A really brown-reddish-yellow person is said to be mweru = white, which in comparison would be considered to be blonde; and this in the Ganda aesthetic language is considered as red = myufu, the most perfect skin pigmentation. (Lugira 1970:34-35)

Nairobi (Kenya) –
In the future the increasing use of skin lightening creams such as "Ambi" may eventually reduce the importance of natural skin color. But whatever the case, in Nairobi of the 1960’s, as throughout much of Kenya, the lighter "brown" girls are usually considered to be more beautiful than "black" girls — and the more successful prostitutes are invariably "brown." (McVicar 1969:242)

Ila, Lunda, Luvale, and Chokwe (Zambia) -
Here too words meaning literally "white" are commonly used to refer to light skins though "red" may also be used. Light skins are admired just as much as is shown to occur among the Ibo, and young girls discussing the possible attractions of various young men have often been heard to emphasize "very black" as a point against someone. In the past at least one attraction of a light skin apart from its intrinsic appeal was the fact that the tattooing stood out against it in strong contrast. Very black skins are not infrequently thought to go hand in hand with inherited witchcraft and a light skin to indicate its absence. Dark-skinned women conscious of their possible disadvantage have been heard to tell men that light-skinned women will be found to be sexually unsatisfying. (White 1954)

Ngoni (Malawi) -
Young men say that what they like in a girl is a light skin colour, a pretty face, and the ability to dance and to copulate well. (Barnes 1951:30)

Kgatla (Botswana) -
... the generally admired type is a light-skinned girl of somewhat heavy build, with prominent breasts and large, firm buttocks. (Schapera 1966: 46)
Evo and Proud: Skin-color preference in sub-Saharan Africa

This is why I leave my mind open to the possibility that all of this may not even be due to racism or white supremacy, but rather to human nature.
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Old 06-28-2013, 04:34 PM
 
252 posts, read 566,467 times
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[quote=AntonioR;30240022]I couldn't find the exact study I was referring to, but this is basically what it said:





Be serious. That study quotes for bias sources. Look at the time period. Most these studies were done during the height of colonialism an European hegmony in Africa. Next you'll be quoting books by Authur Coon.
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Old 06-29-2013, 09:26 AM
Status: "177th Anniversary of Freedom!" (set 5 days ago)
 
6,726 posts, read 9,458,523 times
Reputation: 5187
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillystress215 View Post
Be serious. That study quotes for bias sources. Look at the time period. Most these studies were done during the height of colonialism an European hegmony in Africa. Next you'll be quoting books by Authur Coon.
Hm, it doesn’t seem that you are interesting in finding out what is really going on as oppose to imposing some sort of agenda. If figuring out the truth was of the highest order, then keeping an open mind about this is the most basic thing anyone can do.

I will give you the benefit of the doubt depending on how you answer the following questions.

1. Why are you automatically assuming that a blog post is an actual study and ignored what I wrote regarding that I couldn’t find the study I originally read?

2. Based on what rigorous analyses do you based your assumption that all the sources cited in the page I quoted and linked are “biased?” Please cite the studies that support this.

3. How can you dismiss studies that you have obviously not even read? I highly doubt you’ve read a single one of the sources cited in the page I linked.

4. Why do you feel the need to use a fallacious argument in order to attack what I previously posted?

Like I said before, I am open-minded about these things mostly because my interest is in finding the truth and not so much in spreading an agenda. As of right now, your lack of arguments to effectively rebut what I linked is leading me to think that you are using logical fallacies and fallacious reasoning in an attempt to persuade readers rather than offering relevant evidence that support your assertion that any study cited in the page I linked is "biased."
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Old 06-29-2013, 02:02 PM
 
57,934 posts, read 50,503,038 times
Reputation: 17754
Pedro Albizu Campos - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

He was considered a symbol for the Puerto Rican independence movement.

Pedro Telemaco - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

First Black man to star in a Puerto Rican telenovela.
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Old 06-29-2013, 02:05 PM
 
57,934 posts, read 50,503,038 times
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Carlos Delgado - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:38 PM
 
578 posts, read 824,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
Are you going to deny that Puerto Rico whitened it's country to rid itself of blacks? Blacks and Mulattos made up half the population in PR back during the 19th century. Despite all the sterilization and white immigration, Puerto Ricans still average 20% African, according to genetic tests. This number is easily the 2nd highest total for any Latin American. It just shows you how black Puerto Rico was.
Puerto Rico didn't encourage whitening with the Cedula de Graces. They were encouraging any immigration to Puerto Rico and Cuba to build up society and to make better local societies and to be loyal to the royal Spanish crown. They wanted Catholic immigration as well and subordination to Spain and it's cultural morals.

Much of the population boomed and increased due to people that fled Hispaniola following the Haitian Revolution and revolt.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:44 PM
 
578 posts, read 824,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
Are you going to deny that Puerto Rico whitened it's country to rid itself of blacks? Blacks and Mulattos made up half the population in PR back during the 19th century. Despite all the sterilization and white immigration, Puerto Ricans still average 20% African, according to genetic tests. This number is easily the 2nd highest total for any Latin American. It just shows you how black Puerto Rico was.
What is true is that there was the regla de sacar which meant that people of color could buy their whiteness or that people of color in PR could categorize themselves as white.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:48 PM
 
578 posts, read 824,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unPescador View Post
SuperMario -

My education continues, without much difficulty I found several sources about the sterilization of Puerto Rican women beginning shortly after WWI and continuing through the 1970's, possibly the 1980's. What I read stated that this practice was never an "official" policy but that it was a concerted and organized program widespread in PR based in hospitals as well as health and maternal clinics. It's stated purpose was to control population growth in the expectation that the poverty rate would be reduced. Race is never mentioned but common sense leads me to believe that women in the lower economic groups were the ones subjected to to this practice and it would be no great leap to conclude that black and mixed race women made up the greatest number in this economic group. Was the practice intended to "whiten" Puerto Rico, I don't want to believe so...

But... I now do believe there is some factual foundation to the statements made in the previous posts and I have some more reading to do. It's a positive when these discussion shine a light on a dark subject. Thank you for the learning opportunity.

Forced Sterilization in Puerto Rico » Family Planning



Many Puerto Rican woman in NYC were deliberately sterilized by hospitals and institutions as well!
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:50 PM
 
578 posts, read 824,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PuertoRicanGuy View Post
more info:

African Pride In Puerto Rico Afro-Boricua - YouTube

African History in Puerto Rico - YouTube

Puerto Rico Bomba y Plena - YouTube

Afro Puerto Rico: The Islands Ties to Slavery - YouTube

Black Beauty in Puerto Rico - YouTube

Paul Mooney on Afro-Latinos (African-Latinos) denying their blackness - YouTube
It is said that about half of Puerto Ricans have significant African ancestry.. and yes Puerto Rico was white-washed.. i cant find the links rite now.. but just look it up.. Puerto Rico had the opposite of America's one-drop rule, so all mulatoes were considered "white" by law.. and to top that off a massive immigration of non-spaniard whites immigrated to Puerto Rico during the 1800's, diluting the black, native, and mixed populations.
One drop rule only existed for a short time in the USA. Obe drop rule has nothing to do with slavery.
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