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Old 09-28-2013, 11:09 AM
 
396 posts, read 331,725 times
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the problem with the public school system in P.R. is security and teachers not well train especially in the English department.

And of course a very heavily centralized system run by the politicos in San Juan.
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rush71 View Post
the problem with the public school system in P.R. is security and teachers not well train especially in the English department.

And of course a very heavily centralized system run by the politicos in San Juan.
I wonder, can Puerto Rico abolish the public school system and instead issue vouchers for students to attend private schools?
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rush71 View Post
the problem with the public school system in P.R. is security and teachers not well train especially in the English department.

And of course a very heavily centralized system run by the politicos in San Juan.
My mother a school teacher in the 50s and 60s was an English major and graduated from the Poly in San Germán which was ALL English in the 1940s.

My mother went to an ALL English school in San Germán. In fact, in the 1930s, the public education was in English. She said the pledge every morning.

We had several excellent teachers in this public school I attended from 7th to 8th grade. But, the students were big time "ralea" and I eventually switched to the private system.

The decay is quite obvious!

As I said, OP is suicidal.
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:42 AM
 
107 posts, read 281,018 times
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Originally Posted by Julian658 View Post
Like I said:

Many years ago there were a few schools that were not that bad. Life was a bit different back then. The problem is that your kid will go to school with la "ralea" 24/7. I saw that 50 years ago. Today is a 1000 times worse.

Is the problem that poor kids from bad neighborhoods attend public education? Perhaps PR should do like the US has done...the magnet program. Magnet schools are usually poor performing schools in poor areas that most middle class families would never send their children to. The county or district sets a specific program of interest, like a bilingual program, arts, music, gifted and talented...something of interest and thereby creates a demand to attend the school so that their child may be a part of that particular program. They used to be called magnet schools, now I think it's referred in some locations as school choice programs.

Personally, I believe the real problem is teachers and administrators are paid so poorly along with a lack of mixture of middle income and working class income families from various neighborhoods - the neighborhood issues get mixed into what could be a fairly good school. Plus, the island is overwhelmed with too many public and private schools, community schools, federal based public schools, vocational schools, all sorts of private schools that also seem to not function. For someone coming over here, all of this is confusing. I'll encourage my friend to visit the public schools that interest her most to see which one would be best. She simply will not be able to afford private at the moment and she'll have to make do.

Last question, what about bilingual public schools like the School of San Juan and there are others, but that is the one that comes to mind....are these schools considered any better than a regular public school taught entirely in Spanish (except for English class)?
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:54 AM
 
107 posts, read 281,018 times
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Originally Posted by Rush71 View Post

And of course a very heavily centralized system run by the politicos in San Juan.
There is a lot of talk regarding how the government either fires teachers and administrators from the other political parties once they enter office, but can anyone who has seen the changes from the 50's, 60's till today provide more examples as to how the politicos have ruined public school education. I have never seen such a phenomenon impact most, if not all public schools so negatively like what is done here. Is this a consequence of being a colony? Are the US Virgin Islands as bad as well? Or Guam?

Very interesting. Very depressing as well...but I really appreciate everyone's input.
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Old 09-28-2013, 04:32 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,801 posts, read 9,339,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julian658 View Post
My mother a school teacher in the 50s and 60s was an English major and graduated from the Poly in San Germán which was ALL English in the 1940s.

My mother went to an ALL English school in San Germán. In fact, in the 1930s, the public education was in English. She said the pledge every morning.

We had several excellent teachers in this public school I attended from 7th to 8th grade. But, the students were big time "ralea" and I eventually switched to the private system.

The decay is quite obvious!

As I said, OP is suicidal.
All public education was conducted in English only from the early 1900s until 1944 when then Gov. Rexford Tugwell allowed the use of Spanish.
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Old 09-28-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,801 posts, read 9,339,853 times
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Originally Posted by boricuarosa View Post
Is this a consequence of being a colony?
I believe it's mainly cultural but the desire of the Populares to stay in power via a poorly educated populace also plays a big role.
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Old 09-28-2013, 09:40 PM
 
12,028 posts, read 8,047,279 times
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Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
All public education was conducted in English only from the early 1900s until 1944 when then Gov. Rexford Tugwell allowed the use of Spanish.
My mother (now 97 years old) did 100% of her schooling in English.
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:17 PM
 
396 posts, read 331,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006
All public education was conducted in English only from the early 1900s until 1944 when then Gov. Rexford Tugwell allowed the use of Spanish.


you mean before Munoz and the PPD took power in Puerto Rico in a 1 party state and starting dumbing down Puerto Rico and public education and took out the quality of English out of the schools?
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:51 AM
 
529 posts, read 995,248 times
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Is dumbing down learning in Spanish? There is fetish among some Puerto Ricans, specially those who live in the U.S. and many of a Pitiyanki persuasion on the island, that English is the holy grail to educate kids. If this were so then why is the Puerto Rican community who lives in the states the least accomplished in school among all Latino groups? They all are taught in English, aren't they? Why is the U.S. falling behind in eduaction among all industrialized nations. They all are taught in English aren't they?

As if by magic Puerto Ricans were changed into English speakers tomorrow we would be no better off than the Nuyoricans in the United States, mostly unaccomplished and many living off the dole!

What we should strive for is GOOD EDUCATION , no matter what language its taught in. Kids in Spain , Mexico , Argentina, Cuba etc etc are taught in Spanish and they produce poets, writers, doctors, you name it they have them. They are also taught in English as a foreign language and they learn it because they and don't have the politics of language that we have. Bottom line , If learning in Spanish were so bad all Spanish speaking nations would be like Somalia. However the English language fetish among some Puerto Ricans hides something else, and its not about Education.

The ideal is that we can produce bilingual children but not the bilingualism that has stunted the growth of most Puerto Ricans in the United States.
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