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Old 08-12-2009, 08:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Chutzpah View Post
Is Puerto Rico a racially integrated place? Or is like Mexico where the euro descendants dominate, and just make themselves rich by holding everyone else down.
the richest ppl in mexico arent whites their meztizos

 
Old 08-13-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,799,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city414 View Post
why would puerto have an option as hispanic, hispanic is a US label only. as labels pr does have black., white, mulatto, taino.
Puerto Ricans see themselves as Puerto Ricans first and foremost. Most discrimination in PR is directed at dominican immigrants, however, no one is burning crosses yet. Other than that, most Puerto Ricans don't care if you are white, black, mestizo, mulatto, etc... It also helps that blacks in PR are not crying racism all the time, asking for reparations, or complaining about the white man keeping them down. And I'll bet that a black man born and raised in PR has a better standard of living and working in the island than an African-American living in the USA expecting the government to fulfill his every needs and blaming everyone but themselves.
 
Old 08-13-2009, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,476 posts, read 8,629,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaytusic View Post
I've lived in Chicago and I hated it because the "Puerto Rican" kids/adults would say I'm "Boricua", but they only knew reggaeton and rice and beans;nothing more. I met Puerto Ricans there that had white skin or light eyes and they constantly said "I don't look Puerto Rican, I look white" or if the person didn't act ghetto than they were acting "white" Of course, you have the ignorance of the non-Latinos who think that every Latino is an immigrant, is brown, isn't educated,etc. Thankfully, I also got to live on the island and no, it wasn't the metro, but contrary to what's been said about the REST of the island, where I lived was very diverse. It wasn't shocking to see a Puerto Rican with white or black skin-anything in between, blue,green,brown,grey,etc. eyes, tanned with light eyes, white with dark eyes,etc. It wasn't shocking to hear surnames like Fraticelli, Curet, Wiscovitch or of course, Lopez,Morales. The people in Puerto Rico were way more educated, dressed,organized,not so uptight--it was simply better. Puerto Ricans from the island are VERY diverse and they have this touch to them that can not be described. I truly hope that they never decide to become a state because that will have a negative outcome on who they are, in my opinion.
Yeah you are so right. That's only places out of NYC, because every in NYC knows that Puerto Ricans are not Immigrants by birth. Right now I am in Va Beach, and I get asked are you mixed with white and black. So everytime I tell them I am puerto rican. Or just sometimes I tell them well Puerto Ricans are technically mix because they are made up of Whites(Spain), Blacks (Africa), Indians (Taino). But yeah I hate that question. Everytime they ask me are you mix? Or sometimes they would not believe that I am Hispanic because according to them I do not look Puerto Rican. I guess everybody here thinks that Hispanics have to look like Mexicans in order to be Hispanic.. No offense to the Mexicans, just trying to make a point here.
 
Old 08-14-2009, 04:50 AM
 
1,995 posts, read 3,032,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
Puerto Ricans see themselves as Puerto Ricans first and foremost. Most discrimination in PR is directed at dominican immigrants, however, no one is burning crosses yet. Other than that, most Puerto Ricans don't care if you are white, black, mestizo, mulatto, etc... It also helps that blacks in PR are not crying racism all the time, asking for reparations, or complaining about the white man keeping them down. And I'll bet that a black man born and raised in PR has a better standard of living and working in the island than an African-American living in the USA expecting the government to fulfill his every needs and blaming everyone but themselves.
When I first moved to Puerto Rico I was told by several natives that there is a lot of prejudice against Mexicans here in Puerto Rico. I don't know if it is true or not, but that's what I was told.
 
Old 08-14-2009, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,799,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nycricanpapi View Post
I guess everybody here thinks that Hispanics have to look like Mexicans in order to be Hispanic..
That's why I don't agree with the Hispanic label, which is used mostly in place of race. Hispanic is not a race. Hispanics come in different colors and flavors, from lily white to coal black and everything in between. The cultural differences are huge; I would say that the only thing that Mexicans and Puerto Ricans have in common is language. Music, food, sports, dialects, and customs are totally different. It doesn't help either that the major Hispanic media (i.e. Univision) seem to cater exclusively to the Mexican community.
 
Old 08-14-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
19,578 posts, read 20,368,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandhillian View Post
When I first moved to Puerto Rico I was told by several natives that there is a lot of prejudice against Mexicans here in Puerto Rico. I don't know if it is true or not, but that's what I was told.
I had a Mexican woman in Ponce that was married to a mexican that there was a lot of prejudice against her at work when she moved there.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,672 posts, read 34,777,846 times
Reputation: 11780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
Puerto Ricans see themselves as Puerto Ricans first and foremost. Most discrimination in PR is directed at dominican immigrants, however, no one is burning crosses yet. Other than that, most Puerto Ricans don't care if you are white, black, mestizo, mulatto, etc... It also helps that blacks in PR are not crying racism all the time, asking for reparations, or complaining about the white man keeping them down. And I'll bet that a black man born and raised in PR has a better standard of living and working in the island than an African-American living in the USA expecting the government to fulfill his every needs and blaming everyone but themselves.
Did you spend a lot of time thinking about this post before you wrote it? I'm thinking you did not.........
 
Old 08-18-2009, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,799,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunil's Dad View Post
Did you spend a lot of time thinking about this post before you wrote it? I'm thinking you did not.........
Care to point to which statement you don't agree?
 
Old 08-18-2009, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,672 posts, read 34,777,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
Puerto Ricans see themselves as Puerto Ricans first and foremost. Most discrimination in PR is directed at dominican immigrants, however, no one is burning crosses yet. Other than that, most Puerto Ricans don't care if you are white, black, mestizo, mulatto, etc... It also helps that blacks in PR are not crying racism all the time, asking for reparations, or complaining about the white man keeping them down. And I'll bet that a black man born and raised in PR has a better standard of living and working in the island than an African-American living in the USA expecting the government to fulfill his every needs and blaming everyone but themselves.
You asked. I'll answer. I find it fascinating that you paint Puerto Rico as this nirvana of racial integration, while it, like the rest of Latin America, continues to be a white supremacist society in which that which is African is subjugated to that which is Spanish, and that which is Taino is mythologized to the detriment of that which is African. Blacks in Puerto Rico are conscious of racism; I would argue, however, from dealing with black Puerto Ricans on the island and in the US, that much of the racism is simply internalized and directed inward. There are many blacks who are conscious of their heritage and their place in Puerto Rican history; there are plenty others who deny their blackness (a la Dominicans) and wish to lighten their children (by mating with lighter individuals with "good" hair) so they have a "better" appearance and, therefore, a "better" chance in life. Can you really sit there and tell me that black Puerto Ricans are well-represented in the universities, in the professions (law, business, medicine), in tourism, in media? Hell no, you can't. And if Puerto Rican blacks have it so wonderful in their home country (I know full well what the political status of the island is; this is a political statement), then why are the demographics of the island much less "black" than the demographics of Puerto Rican exiles in the U.S mainland? And, finally, what gave you the notion that blacks in the U.S. "expect(ing) the government to fulfill his every needs and blaming everyone but themselves."

Who does this, and what might they be blaming everyone but themselves for? Can't wait to hear your thoughts.
 
Old 08-18-2009, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,799,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunil's Dad View Post
.... Can you really sit there and tell me that black Puerto Ricans are well-represented in the universities, in the professions (law, business, medicine), in tourism, in media? Hell no, you can't....
It only took me 5 minutes to find this:

Black history in Puerto Rico - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
Notable Puerto Ricans of African ancestry

The following is a list of Puerto Ricans of African descent born in the island who have reached notability in their respective fields, either in Puerto Rico, the United States, and/or internationally:

* Campos, Juan Morel - composer, was considered by many to be responsible for taking the genre of danza to its highest level.[51]
* Dr. Campos, Pedro Albizu - lawyer, an advocate of Puerto Rican independence from the United States, and leader and president of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party from 1930 until his death.[52]
* Dr. Barbosa, Jose Celso - was a medical Physician, sociologist, and political leader of Puerto Rico.[53]
* Dr. Barbosa, Pilar - was an educator, historian and political activist.[54]
* Benitez, Wilfred - boxer who won world championships in three separate weight divisions, and was the youngest world champion in boxing history.[55]
* Richardson, Carmen Belen - actress and a comedian considered to be a pioneer of Puerto Rican television.[56]
* Campeche, Jose - the first known Puerto Rican artist and considered by many as one of the best rococo artists in the Americas.[57]
* Dr. Canales, José Ferrer - educator, writer and a pro-independence political activist.[58]
* Capo, Bobby - internationally known singer and songwriter.[59]
* Clemente, Roberto - baseball player, first Latin American to be selected and the only current Hall of Famer for whom the mandatory five year waiting period was waived since the wait was instituted in 1954.[60]
* Cepeda, Orlando "Peruchin" - baseball player, inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.[61]
* Cepeda, Rafael - folk musician and composer, was the patriarch of the Cepeda family, known internationally as the exponents of Puerto Rican-African folk music.[62]
* Chen, Nero - was the first Puerto Rican professional boxer to gain international recognition.[34]
* Colon, Jesus - writer and politician known as the Father of the Nuyorican Movement.[37]
* Cordero, Rafael - known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico", was a self-educated Puerto Rican of African ancestry who provided free schooling to children regardless of their race.[63]
* Cruz, Jose "Cheo" - baseball player, honored by the Astros, when the team retired his number, #25.[64]
* Curet Alonso, Tite - composer, composer of over 2,000 salsa songs.[65]
* Delgado, Carlos - baseball player, a Major League Baseball first baseman.[66]
* Del Villard, Sylvia - was an actress, dancer, choreographer and Afro-Puerto Rican activist.[67]
* Feliciano, Jose "Cheo" - composer and singer of salsa and bolero music.[68]
* Fernandez, Ruth - singer and actress, the first Latina singer of romantic music to sing in the Scandinavian countries and the first Latina to record with a North American band.[69]
* Flores, Pedro - composer, one Puerto Rico's best known composers of Ballads and Boleros.[70]
* Hernandez, Juano - actor, the first Puerto Ricans of African descent to become a major star in the United States and one of the first "new style" black screen actors, who neither sang nor danced but played regular characters.[71]
* Hernandez, Rafael - musician and composer, considered by many to be the greatest composer of Puerto Rican music.[72]
* Navarro, Emilio "Millito" - baseball player, the first Puerto Rican to play baseball in the Negro Leagues.[73]
* Pellot, Victor - baseball player, the second black Puerto Rican to play in Major League Baseball and the first Puerto Rican to play in the American League.[74]
* Ramos Antonini, Ernesto - was the President of the House of Representatives of Puerto Rico and co-founder of the "Partido Popular Democrático de Puerto Rico" (Popular Democratic Party of Puerto Rico).[75]
* Rosa Nales, Pedro - News anchor/ Reporter - journalist he has received over 200 awards.[76]
* Santos-Febres, Mayra - writer, poet, essayist, screenwriter, and college professor who has garnered recognitions in Puerto Rico and abroad.[77]
* Schomburg, Arturo Alfonso - historian, writer and activist in the United States who researched and raised awareness of the great contributions that Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Americans have made to society.[78]
* Trinidad, Felix - professional boxer, considered as one of the best boxers in that archipelago's history.[79]
* Venegas, Juan Evangelista - boxer, was the first Puerto Rican to win an Olympic medal.[80]
* Warrington, Otilio "Bizcocho" - comedian and actor, best known for his roles of "Bizcocho" and "Cuca Gomez".[81]
* Williams, Bernie - former Major League Baseball outfielder and a professional jazz musician.[82]
Blacks in PR are better represented than in the US, and it wasn't because of affirmative action, but because of personal achievements.


Quote:
And if Puerto Rican blacks have it so wonderful in their home country (I know full well what the political status of the island is; this is a political statement), then why are the demographics of the island much less "black" than the demographics of Puerto Rican exiles in the U.S mainland?
Can you provide a link to your numbers? And cover the whole US, not just NYC.
Quote:
And, finally, what gave you the notion that blacks in the U.S. "expect(ing) the government to fulfill his every needs and blaming everyone but themselves."
Who does this, and what might they be blaming everyone but themselves for? Can't wait to hear your thoughts.
Personal experience. I lived in Camden, NJ. Less than 5% of the population there is white, about 50% is black and 45% is Hispanic. I worked between blacks. The white supervisors were afraid of reprimanding a black employee for fear of him making a discrimination complaint, which happened all too often. On the other hand, whites and Hispanics were reprimanded all the time, even for minor stuff. Blacks in the USA are given more opportunities these days than anyone else. The fact that they don't move up the socioeconomic ladder says a lot about them. Even illegal Mexicans, which have no benefits at all and are also subject to discrimination are doing better than blacks.
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