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Old 05-30-2014, 02:29 PM
 
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I don't know what the big deal is here? Most people are territorial, some more than others. If you're coming from middle America , the South, the Rust belt or evangelical America why is anyone here talking about Puerto Ricans being disrespectful calling people gringos. Believe me if you've lived in Tea Party America lately Puerto Rico must feel like Paradise.

In fact Puerto Ricans are so tolerant it's scary. However most , if not all Puerto Ricans , have a very strong hold on their identity, a hold that is so strong that we are always vigilant and get annoyed if we perceive someone is being disrespectful. That's why I always say we should be compared more to Quebec or Catalonia than to Hawaii or Texas.

The important thing to do is when going to Puerto Rico think like if it's a foreign country like Costa Rica or The Dominican Republic, certainly not like Colorado or Florida. Once you get that clear you can begin understanding us. Don't listen to rabid statehooders because they will try to give you a wrong impression by kissing your feet in a servile manner and trying to hide reality. Go out to the island and speak to the REAL people and only then will you get a gist of what Im saying. Americans are well liked until they put their foot in their mouth and then hell breaks loose.
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Old 05-30-2014, 06:10 PM
 
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Yes, in many ways Puerto Rico is like a foreign country. However, seeing the US flag flying, US currency and USPS trucks, for example, do remind people that they are on US soil.

A while back we went to PR for a visit. Since we had never taken a tour of the Barcardi facility, we headed over there. On the tour we took, were some German tourists. Our guide was telling us about a rum that she said "Was only sold in Puerto Rico and not in America". Well...the German tourists were really confused after hearing this. One of them said to the guide "Puerto Rico is part of America". The guide then acknowledged that Puerto Rico was, indeed, part of America but what she meant to say was that this type of rum was not sold on the Mainland US.

You are born and raised on the Island. So, you don't know what it is like for those of us who weren't born there and are not full Puerto Rican.

What, exactly, and where, exactly is "Tea Party America"? And what, exactly, goes on there that has you so upset? As far as I know, there are Tea Party members in every state.

If Puerto Ricans are so "tolerant", then why, was there all this anti-English sentiment going on in the late 60s and early 70s? Those of us who weren't fluent Spanish speakers were really made to feel uncomfortable as we often got looks of pure hate and weren't treated well by many people. Notice that I didn't say all treated us this way. We met many accepting people and were appreciative of them. We never had any problems from our Puerto Rican relatives. My great-aunt, for example, was a loving person who knew practically no English and was always thrilled to hear me speak Spanish. In fact, she would give me a big hug and praise me to the hilt. She has long since passed away but I always remember her with fondness.

As for the whole statehood vs. commonwealth vs. independence debate --- last time we were on The Island, we were amazed at how many people would engage us in conversation and bring up this very topic. Since I know how heated this topic can get, we would listen to what they had to say---and it is clear that whichever side they supported, they all had well thought out opinions.

Last edited by BOS2IAD; 05-30-2014 at 07:04 PM..
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Old 05-31-2014, 10:00 AM
 
529 posts, read 990,045 times
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[quote=BOS2IAD;35025807]Yes, in many ways Puerto Rico is like a foreign country. However, seeing the US flag flying, US currency and USPS trucks, for example, do remind people that they are on US soil.

A while back we went to PR for a visit. Since we had never taken a tour of the Barcardi facility, we headed over there. On the tour we took, were some German tourists. Our guide was telling us about a rum that she said "Was only sold in Puerto Rico and not in America". Well...the German tourists were really confused after hearing this. One of them said to the guide "Puerto Rico is part of America". The guide then acknowledged that Puerto Rico was, indeed, part of America but what she meant to say was that this type of rum was not sold on the Mainland US.

You are born and raised on the Island. So, you don't know what it is like for those of us who weren't born there and are not full Puerto Rican.

What, exactly, and where, exactly is "Tea Party America"? And what, exactly, goes on there that has you so upset? As far as I know, there are Tea Party members in every state.

If Puerto Ricans are so "tolerant", then why, was there all this anti-English sentiment going on in the late 60s and early 70s? Those of us who weren't fluent Spanish speakers were really made to feel uncomfortable as we often got looks of pure hate and weren't treated well by many people. Notice that I didn't say all treated us this way. We met many accepting people and were appreciative of them. We never had any problems from our Puerto Rican relatives. My great-aunt, for example, was a loving person who knew practically no English and was always thrilled to hear me speak Spanish. In fact, she would give me a big hug and praise me to the hilt. She has long since passed away but I always remember her with fondness.

As for the whole statehood vs. commonwealth vs. independence debate --- last time we were on The Island, we were amazed at how many people would engage us in conversation and bring up this very topic. Since I know how heated this topic can get, we would listen to what they had to say---and it is clear that whichever side they supported, they all had well thought out opinions.[/QUOTE

The U.S. Flag flies with the Puerto Rican flag on the same height, not one lower than the other as state flags usually do in the states. U.S. Currency is not a guarantee you are in the U.S. Panama and Ecuador use U.S. Currency also. And about UPS trucks they are all over the world, not just in the U.S.

About being part of the U.S., Supreme Court decisions have concluded over and over again that Puerto Rico BELONGS to the U.S. But it's NOT PART OF THE U.S. figure that one out!

About tolerance in the 60's, you must be a Nuyorican because the anti-English attitudes you noticed were a back lash to the arrogant Nuyoricans who made fun of locals for being hill billies and didn't speak English.

About status, it's the ongoing political dilemma for most Puerto Ricans specially men while sitting down for a few beers with their buddies.
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Old 05-31-2014, 12:19 PM
 
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And about UPS trucks they are all over the world, not just in the U.S.
-------------------
Ummm....I didn't say UPS trucks. Of course UPS is all over the world! What I said was USPS. You do know what USPS is, don't you? I'm sure that you must have bought stamps there at some point, no?

Yes, PR "belongs" to the US and Puerto Ricans are American citizens. And, yes, its status is that of a territory. Who knows? That may change at some point. We'll see.

No, I am NOT a Nuyorican. My family NEVER made fun of Puerto Ricans. Why would we? My father is a native-born Puerto Rican. And I never heard or saw anyone make fun of the locals right to their faces.

BTW, I've see the PR flag flying below the US flag before on the Island. In fact, I recall our daughter pointing it out more than a few times when we would take her for visits.

Whatever the reason for anti-English sentiment, there was no excuse for it. Just because some people supposedly made fun of those who didn't speak English, it did not give anyone the right to treat those whose Spanish wasn't perfect in such an abhorrent way.
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Old 05-31-2014, 01:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post


Whatever the reason for anti-English sentiment, there was no excuse for it. Just because some people supposedly made fun of those who didn't speak English, it did not give anyone the right to treat those whose Spanish wasn't perfect in such an abhorrent way.
At the time the island governor was Luis A. Ferré and he had an accent when he spoke English. I remember a Nuyorican saying that the governor could not speak English. That did not go over too well with me. This was shameful because Ferré was an MIT graduate and very bright. An accent does not mean a person cannot speak English.

I once communicated with a Nuyorican in a forum and he was planning a visit to PR. He asked me if we had Internet on the island. He also thought the culture of the island was entirely African.

Those are the sort of things that do not go down very well to the locals.

Last edited by Julian658; 05-31-2014 at 02:19 PM..
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Old 05-31-2014, 02:12 PM
 
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So...one Nuyorican was ignorant enough to ask if there is internet service on the Island and that the culture is "entirely African". I do believe that such Nuyoricans are in the minority---a very, very small minority.

As for those who thought that Ferre couldn't speak English because he spoke with an accent---well...it's amazing to me that anyone who hears a person speak English with an accent would automatically assume that the person isn't fluent. As you well know, the DC area has a high number of foreign-born people. They speak English with accents but so what? Having an accent doesn't mean that a person isn't fluent.

I expect such questions to come from non-PRs who are not familiar with the Island and don't even know that it is part of the US. When my family moved there in the late 60s, I actually had someone ask if we would be living in a grass hut. And then there was the person who asked me to send her a postcard so that she could have a Puerto Rican postage stamp.

Still, in recent times I find more people are better informed about the Island.
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Old 05-31-2014, 02:13 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julian658 View Post
At the time the island governor was Luis A. Ferré and he had an accent when he spoke English. I remember a Nuyorican saying that the governor could not speak English. That did not go over too well with me. This was shameful because Ferré was an MIT graduate and very bright. An accent does not mean a person cannot speak English.

I once communicated with a Nuyorican in a forum and he was planning a visit to PR. He asked me if we had Internet on the island. He also thought the culture of the island was entirely African.

Those are the sort of things that go down very well to the locals.
You are most likely thinking of Rafael Hernandez Colon, he detests the speaking of English and banned it as an official language in 1991. He insists that the United States make Spanish as an official language.

Luis Ferre is probably one of the greatest Puerto Ricans of all time. He had a tremendous vision and was very active in philanthropy, the arts, etc. He was also the first elected pro-statehood & Republican governor.

Hilariously laughing at the Nuyorican thinking the island has an African culture
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Old 05-31-2014, 05:46 PM
 
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Ah, yes, Rafael Hernandez Colon---I hadn't thought of him in years. What I remember is when he became governor, things changed (and not for the better) when Ferre left office. I remember that many people were not too happy with Hernandez Colon. Of course this all happened when I was too young to vote. I went to college on the Mainland and I remember my parents telling me that I had to register to vote so that I could vote in the presidential election. To them, my vote represented the whole family since PR residents can't vote for president. They were so pleased when I voted

I still remember how bad it was on the Island when anti-English sentiment took hold. Many times, people would greet me with a smile, speak to me in Spanish and when I would answer in my imperfect Spanish, their whole attitude towards me would change for the worse. It was always a welcome relief to come across those who didn't care that my Spanish wasn't fluent. In fact, many times they would answer me in English. That was nice but...I really needed to practice my Spanish Sometimes it felt like I couldn't win no matter what I did.
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Old 05-31-2014, 05:55 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,801 posts, read 9,303,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
Ah, yes, Rafael Hernandez Colon---I hadn't thought of him in years. What I remember is when he became governor, things changed (and not for the better) when Ferre left office. I remember that many people were not too happy with Hernandez Colon. Of course this all happened when I was too young to vote. I went to college on the Mainland and I remember my parents telling me that I had to register to vote so that I could vote in the presidential election. To them, my vote represented the whole family since PR residents can't vote for president. They were so pleased when I voted

I still remember how bad it was on the Island when anti-English sentiment took hold. Many times, people would greet me with a smile, speak to me in Spanish and when I would answer in my imperfect Spanish, their whole attitude towards me would change for the worse. It was always a welcome relief to come across those who didn't care that my Spanish wasn't fluent. In fact, many times they would answer me in English. That was nice but...I really needed to practice my Spanish Sometimes it felt like I couldn't win no matter what I did.
The funny part is that he claims to favor bilingualism

http://www.rafaelhernandezcolon.org/...UL_24_2003.pdf
http://www.rafaelhernandezcolon.org/...UN_28_2012.pdf
His editorials are hilarious ... always good for a few laughs.
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Old 05-31-2014, 06:33 PM
 
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Thanks for the links.

Typical politician---flip-flopping and back pedaling, sigh!
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