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Old 10-11-2010, 08:43 AM
 
91 posts, read 310,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
Couldn't disagree more with this statement. I've lived in Southern California for 30 years and have witnessed and experienced first hand what illegal immigration has done to this once great state. Illegals use to come here to work hard and provide for their families back home. Most kept a low profile and stayed out of trouble. The plight of illegals such as these was not only understood, but even admired.

Not so now a days. Many of these new illegals come here looking for "las ayuditas" which come to them by way of my hard earned tax dollars. Besides being law breakers [as a result of their illegal status], many refuse to learn English and expect for everyone to speak Spanish to them. Properties in neighborhoods plagued by illegal immigrants have a notorious tendency of losing value very quickly. Why? Because many illegals out here are not quick to upkeep their homes. On top of that, these neighborhoods are strewn with litter. But what really irks many people is the audacity with which many illegal immigrants demand at equal rights at par with those of us who are here legally.

Again, based on my personal experience and not that of anyone else, I could not disagree more with traveler00 POV.
I think you bring some interesting points for discussion.

But I was making a statement more about immigrants in general, not necessarily illegals.

I do feel that Puerto Ricans, at least, should be more respectful of the nationality and origin of some people that co-inhabit the island, and stop being so outspoken about their prejudices. It just speaks negatively of the level of civility achieved in the island and of lack of understanding of the laws and values we supposedly stand for.
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Old 10-11-2010, 11:09 AM
 
2,880 posts, read 3,420,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traveler00 View Post
I think you bring some interesting points for discussion.

But I was making a statement more about immigrants in general, not necessarily illegals.

I do feel that Puerto Ricans, at least, should be more respectful of the nationality and origin of some people that co-inhabit the island, and stop being so outspoken about their prejudices. It just speaks negatively of the level of civility achieved in the island and of lack of understanding of the laws and values we supposedly stand for.
If you were solely referring to legal immigrants, then I am in agreement with you. When people out here use the word "immigrant" it's understood that the the word "illegal" has been purposely left out of the phrase. It's one of those politically correct things that we've grown accustomed to.

However, in the opinion of many, illegal immigrants are law breakers and should not rewarded in any way shape or form for their unlawful deeds. Such is the reason why our neighbor state of Arizona enacted SB-1070 for the purpose of controlling the illegal immigrant tsunami that has enveloped our states. I'd wish California would enact a similar law but, that's a long shot aways.

My hope is that Puerto Rico will closely watch how Arizona's SB-1070 unfolds. If anyone needs to stem the influx of illegal immigrants is our tiny island of Puerto Rico. A small island like ours can only accommodate the needs of a select number of people.
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Old 10-11-2010, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,228 posts, read 2,134,650 times
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To me, the harsher the economic conditions, the more savage the opposition of illegal immigrants. I have seen this in 3 different capacities. The most popular argument of course stems from mostly Mexican illegals in the United States, particularly the southwest and Deep South. I understand a lot of where each side is coming from, but in the end a lot of these communities needed the labor, that's why all these folks moved here. It wasn't a problem with a lot of people until the economy went sour.

Meanwhile, Puerto Rico's economy has been lower longer, and of course has gotten worse due to its larger relationship with the U.S. mainland. So with these tough times and the more savage competition for jobs, you just see an uptick in people being pissed about the Dominican influx. You find more extreme and hateful things coming from the average Puerto Rican about the illegal issue than you tend to find on the mainland in regard to their issues. Take it for what it is.

And the last piece of the puzzle, which validates what I said about the other two places, is the Dominican Republic itself. I lived there for a month in 2006. Haitians were nothing to them. They were called monkeys by the Dominicans, forced to work in slave-like conditions, and Haitian-Dominican intermarriage was completely denied as even existing by the government. Economic conditions there were so bad that the Haitians often weren't viewed as trustworthy people, or people at all, by the average Dominican. And the more xenophobic Dominicanos? Whoa, that's scary. Haitians have been found beheaded in Santo Domingo- enough said.

All of these examples are total hypocricy. It has nothing to do with staying true and everything to do with how good/bad the economy is doing. All of these places I mentioned needed the outside labor, but the tough times have made the opposition louder and more hateful.
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Old 10-14-2010, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 956,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Mutt View Post
I understand where some Puertoricans are coming from when they talk about Dominicans (either legal or illegal) in their Island. I've been in both sides of the Isle. You see, my father is Puertorican and my mother is half Puertorican and half Dominican, we were both born in the DR my mother moved to PR over 50 years ago after my grandfather died and my father left, the reason was that she wanted to make a better living because she was a single mother and even though she was a prepared person (she was a nurse) she thought the opportunities would be better in PR since she had 4 or 5 Puertorican siblings and I believe 4 uncles and aunts there, BUMMER!, she had to work 10 to 12 hours a day in a factory just to make ends meet, but she never, ever confronted or encountered the dislike and the hatred towards Dominicans that's so prevalent now a days not only in the Island but also in NY where I live now, even though 99 percent of the people that worked with her didn't know that she was 50% Puertorrican.

As for myself, I got to PR in the early 70s (legally I might add) at a very young age and, not even a week after I'd arrived, I started making friends in the Barrio and all of those people I befriended were all Puertorricans and knowing that I was Dominican, they accepted me as one of theirs without knowing that I was more than half Puertorrican, they found that out as time passed. When I was leaving in DR, I was "el hijo del Puertorriqueno", when I got to PR I was just one of the guys, everyone called me by my name, or the nickname I was given that, had nothing to do with me being Dominican. Yes I consider myself Dominican because I believe you are from where you are born.

Well, after a few years of leaving in PR I married a Puertorrican girl and moved to NYC, we used to go back every other year on vacation and to visit family. We stopped going to PR for a number of years 10 years to be exact, in 1996 was when I noticed the change, the discontent and the aberration of the Puertoricans towards Dominicans, I noticed that even my own mother had joined in the chorus (estos Dominicanos estan jodiendo to) and for the first time in all my years socializing and living amongst Puertorricans I felt out of place, I realized that Puertorricans don't want us in their Island. I asked my mother when did that started? and she said that started happening in the late 80s when all the illegals started coming in and moving into other neighborhoods besides Barrio Obrero or Villa Palmeras, at that time those were the places where Dominicans congregated. Now they are all over the place taking over all the good neighborhoods and living 10 and 12 in a house provided by section 8 because 3 of them are legal residents. Yes my mother, the Dominican born, half Puertorican is pissed because the illegal Dominicans are screwing everything up for the legal ones, and I, kind of agree with my mother in the sense that, If we being the direct descendants of Puertoricans have to go through the trouble of applying, interviewing and having to go through hell to get a visa or a green card to come here, why can they do the same thing?. I agree with my mother that a few bad apples are spoiling the whole barrel, and we the ones that came here the legal way have to pay for those bad apples.

I might sound more like a Puertorican than a Dominican, but that's not the way I want to come across, as I mentioned previously, I am Dominican, but now every time I go to Puerto Rico I hear it even from my best friends there, without them even realizing they are talking to me, a Dominican and, when I remind them, their answer is "you are not one of them, you are from the old Dominicans", still I feel out of place, I love that Island more than I love the DR then again, when ever I go there, I feel that I don't belong anymore, just because some bad apples spoiled the whole barrel.

There is no way that this problem can be fixed, the US government has no priority in the illegal immigration that affects Puerto Rico right now, not with the problems they are having in the Mexican border. You see, the American government does not consider illegal immigration in Puerto Rico a threat to their security. but still, we the legal Dominicans are the ones suffering the rejection and the ridicule of the Puertoricans, so all we can do is eat from the same plate, use the same toilets and smell each other sh...t because this is not going to be fixed any time soon. This has nothing to do with race or color or religion or any of that nonsense that some people talk about here, it has to do with a people trying to better themselves but doing it the wrong way and, the good Dominican people that really and sincerely love that little piece of land called Borinquen are paying for it.

Yes I love that Island, I know more about it than I know about the DR since I've never been to DR since I left almost 40 years ago but that doesn't make me any less Dominican.
I bet their is a larger sector of the population that likes PRicans than those who dislike them. It sucks when people generalize.
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Old 10-15-2010, 02:59 AM
Status: "Enjoying the moment" (set 13 days ago)
 
5,828 posts, read 8,598,951 times
Reputation: 4557
Here is something very interesting published in El Nuevo Día newspaper:

Alegan drástica reducción en los viajes ilegales desde Dominicana

For those that don't understand Spanish:

Dramatic Reduction in Illegal Trips from Dominican Republic

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Old 10-15-2010, 08:50 AM
 
2,880 posts, read 3,420,269 times
Reputation: 4342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
Here is something very interesting published in El Nuevo Día newspaper:

Alegan drástica reducción en los viajes ilegales desde Dominicana

For those that don't understand Spanish:

Dramatic Reduction in Illegal Trips from Dominican Republic

This is great and welcomed news.

I was in Puerto Rico this past August. While at the Cerro Gordo beach one day, I saw at a distance two identically dressed men with helmets on jet skis. I mentioned to a friend how awkward it was for these two men to be stationary so far from the shore while on their jet skis. I was told they were part of the aquatic police patrol. Had no idea such a branch existed. That is really great and am glad their service is rendering great results!
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Old 10-15-2010, 10:16 AM
 
8,750 posts, read 16,449,772 times
Reputation: 4168
I like Cerro Gordo! But really the underlying issue here is resources..and PR has too few to go around for their own population, let alone others coming illegally. DR has the same problem with Haitians, etc. Drug trafficking and the high crime rate doesn't help matter either, and people always need someone to blame, and it's always someone new/economically lower than them = Dominicans. I don't think there is an answer as we know it is imporssible to stop illegal immigration, but we can decrease it, and we are having some success.

I also have noticed alot of Dominicans from NYC moving to PR, instead of going back home to Dominican Republic. Are people also having problems with them, or is it just the illegal Dominincans? From what I can tell, PR is being inundated by both illegal immigration from the DR, as well as legal immigration from Dominicans in NYC/mainland USA. And with another huge exodus of PRs from PR over the last few years, the demographics will be changing substantially over the next 2 decades, IMO.
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Old 10-15-2010, 02:51 PM
 
91 posts, read 310,989 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
Here is something very interesting published in El Nuevo Día newspaper:

Alegan drástica reducción en los viajes ilegales desde Dominicana

For those that don't understand Spanish:

Dramatic Reduction in Illegal Trips from Dominican Republic


This is no good news at all...
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Old 10-15-2010, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY $$$
6,836 posts, read 13,252,088 times
Reputation: 1609
Quote:
Originally Posted by traveler00 View Post
This is no good news at all...
why do you say that?
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Old 10-15-2010, 04:00 PM
 
91 posts, read 310,989 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by jordandubreil View Post
why do you say that?
Simple. Economy's so bad that Dominicans are not interested as much. Hopefully this is not the beginning of yolas going in the opposite direction, he, he.
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