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Old 03-24-2008, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Saipan, CNMI
1 posts, read 7,819 times
Reputation: 11

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A recent rumor has started about Saipan and Guam joining to create a state.
What will happen?
I want to know possible disadvantages and advantages to this.

Any ideas?
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Old 03-25-2008, 06:34 AM
 
59 posts, read 344,183 times
Reputation: 55
Bear in mind that rumors of this nature virtually never materialize. In fact, they are generally never even more than just a rumor - in other words, there isn't even anything substantive behind them. In reality, when things like this are serious and there is a formal movement behind them, it can never be kept secret for long (assuming they even have a reason to keep it secret, which is debatable in this case since they would require the support of the citizenry to make it happen). So, when you start seeing articles in the local paper about it, people on the local radio or tv discussing it, etc. then you can assume there's actually something behind it. Before anything tangible like that, you may be spending your time on just another meaningless rumor.
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Old 04-19-2008, 09:18 PM
 
3 posts, read 47,598 times
Reputation: 12
Why is Guam apart from the Northern Mariana Islands politically.
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Old 04-20-2008, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Bristol, WI
281 posts, read 838,967 times
Reputation: 194
Good: You get a representative and two Senators. Then the federal government HAS to listen to you, you get a cut of the federal budget, and maybe they'll finally do something about the godawful snake infestation that the military caused. Your economy will almost certainly benefit with more business opportunities.
Bad: Federal taxes, regulations and a big influx of mainland immigrants driving up prices.
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Old 04-28-2008, 01:34 PM
 
1,781 posts, read 4,111,305 times
Reputation: 1520
Well I know that the Statehood Supporters would like Guam to re-unite with the CNMI (Commonwealth of The Northern Marianas) first before it even follows the path to Statehood.

In my opinion Statehood has more Advantages than Disadvantages for the People in the Marianas Islands.

It's sad that even though the Marianas Islands are U.S Territories and the people in those islands are U.S Citizens,the majority of Mainland Americans do not know that the Marianas Islands are a part of the U.S and the people there are also Americans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richille View Post
A recent rumor has started about Saipan and Guam joining to create a state.
What will happen?
I want to know possible disadvantages and advantages to this.

Any ideas?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2008, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Ridgway/Saint Marys, PS
947 posts, read 3,303,343 times
Reputation: 452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caliguy2007 View Post
Well I know that the Statehood Supporters would like Guam to re-unite with the CNMI (Commonwealth of The Northern Marianas) first before it even follows the path to Statehood.

In my opinion Statehood has more Advantages than Disadvantages for the People in the Marianas Islands.

It's sad that even though the Marianas Islands are U.S Territories and the people in those islands are U.S Citizens,the majority of Mainland Americans do not know that the Marianas Islands are a part of the U.S and the people there are also Americans.
I agree with you.... for as many problems as some people say the USA has, I think it would benefit the islands.

I also agree with you that it's safe people don't know the Marianas Islands are US Territories or the residents of the CNMI are US Citizens.

Geck, I betchaa fair amount of people in the US don't even know where CNMI, Saipan or Guam even are... and if you asked some people, I bet they think they'd know and point in the wrong place on the map.
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Old 06-19-2008, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, West Virginia
82 posts, read 600,303 times
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I know this is far from anything concrete but here are two links to australian news articles that are interesting..

Combined Guam, CNMI could become US state

Guam may consider 51st US state bid

and statehood websites...

Statehood for Guam -- Perspectives in Focus

Equality Across the Pacific

I also once saw something about creating a state called pacifica.. combining the old trust territory, including guam.
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Old 08-22-2008, 08:39 AM
 
6 posts, read 18,823 times
Reputation: 10
Default Background

Quote:
Originally Posted by gars129 View Post
Why is Guam apart from the Northern Mariana Islands politically.
Apologize for the long post. Feel free to ignore the history lesson or give your POV!

Well, after the Spanish-American War, Guam, a Spanish colony, became a US territory. The US had an opportunity to annex the rest of the Marianas but they thought the purchase price too expensive. So, Spain sold the rest of the Mariana Islands to Germany. That is how the Mariana Islands were politically separated.

Fast-foward....after WWII, the rest of the Marianas becomes a Trust Territory under the United Nations. To make a long story short, the UN and US wanted all the islands in Micronesia under TTPI (Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands) to form one government and for a short time they had one while trying to decide their future (Congress of Micronesia). Most of the islands in Micronesia wanted independence while the people in the northern Marianas island chain wanted a closer relationship with the United States having observed the quality of life of relatives on Guam who later became US citizens.

As the Congress of Micronesia leaned towards independence, the people of the Marianas, who had no real cultural links to the rest of Micronesia, became desparate and drummed up efforts to reunify with Guam. But, bitterness towards Chamorros on Saipan who helped the Japanese during the invasion of Guam, during WWII, led to a vote against reunification with the islands in the north. There are other factors but many folks agree that this was probably the main reason.

The people in the islands north of Guam become successful in convincing the UN to separate from the rest of the Micronesia. They also convinced the US to make them a part of their family. This led to the Covenant which outlined the relationship between the United States and the people of what became the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. As a US Commonwealth, the people became US citizens and the recipient of a lot of financial assistance to develop the islands' economy which was devasted by WWII.

It is highly unlikely that the two governments will unite despite having the same culture. Reunification was the most recent topic for the Attorney General's Cup wherein students argue both sides of the issue. But, there is no real effort on either end to open talks about reunification.

If reunification were to occur it will likely be a step towards statehood which as someone mentioned will have advantanges and disadvantages.

Trailerguy has it right with regard to assisting Guam with the eradiciation/control of the brown tree snake and helping the CNMI with their economy which is almost at the end of a downward spiral. Also, land alienation issues, if changed, will mean many immigrants purchasing land which natives will never be able to purchase because land is limited. However, as the world gets smaller, it makes sense to eliminate restrictions on land ownership and it will be up to the people to pass down their culture wherever they settle in the world.

Also, I agree with Caliguy2007. I attended an education conference for educators not too long ago and sat at a table with social studies teachers from all over the United States. Not one of them knew where the CNMI was or that it was part of the American family which I found really terrible because they taught geography AND history. They heard of Guam (a little island in the Pacific)and asked if people went around naked. One person asked if people had cars. It was funny and well, sad.
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Old 08-23-2015, 04:38 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,977 times
Reputation: 10
Just to correct a little on manta670: All of the Mariana Islands were united as one under Spanish colonialism before the Spanish-American War. This was so since the 1500's when Spain conquered them and took the island chain over. In 1898, Spain lost the war to the Americans. The US in turn took Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines, all under the Spanish. When it came to The Mariana Islands, The United States only wanted Guam. It was a major coaling station for ships. They left the rest of the islands, which is now The Northern Mariana Islands, with the Spanish. The Spanish in turn sold The Northern Mariana Islands to Germany. World War I came along and the Germans lost the war. Under The Versailles Treaty, The Northern Mariana Islands were then awarded to the Japanese, who were on the winning side. World War II came along and the Japanese were on the losing end this time. Under the new United Nations, there were World War II trust territories from the losing nations, created all around the world. The Mariana Islands, The Marshall Islands, Palau (or Belau) and what is now the Federated States of Micronesia (Yap, Pohnpei, Kosrae and Chuuk, which was once called Truk) became the Micronesian Trust Territory administered by the US. Guam remained in US hands since the Spanish-American War and in 1950 with the Guam Organic Act signed by President Harry Truman, became an official US territory. Now, the rest is explained very well by manta670. There is also loads of fascinating history, in particular during World War II. Will The Mariana Islands and Guam ever unite again? That remains up to the peoples of both entities. History, sometimes stands in the way. But, I think, having lived in both places, that it is to their advantage to do so.
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Old 08-23-2015, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,412,647 times
Reputation: 979
It's odd that there's alot of continental Americans that don't even know Guam and Saipan exist yet they're both popular vacation spots for Japanese vacationers.
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