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Old 07-09-2018, 01:10 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,636 posts, read 37,307,668 times
Reputation: 17517

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phlinak View Post
Why are you so judgmental and unsympathetic?

I hope you don't go around calling yourself a "Christian" because your comments don't sound like Christ's love to me.
I am an atheist. And also a humanist... I believe that every person is capable of being a productive and capable human being. In this case, I fully believe that the Puerto Ricans in hotel rooms should not be passively staying in their rooms and watching tv in air conditioned comfort, when they could be living there but working to bring in a living. They are American citizens and they could sign up with a temp work agency or as I suggested earlier, working a food stand selling food and asking for donations to help their island. And they could and should also be considering making plans to stay more permanently on the mainland.

Puerto Rico is an island along hurricane alley. And chances are that they will endure more big hurricane hits in the near future. So it doesn't make sense to not consider life on the US mainland instead, and visit their island more for vacations. And the island being in the hurricane zone, it doesn't make sense to rebuild the destroyed homes and the electric power lines just like before Hurricane Maria devastated their island... and the Puerto Rican people can't afford to build homes that could withstand a category 4 hurricane. And our US government doesn't owe the Puerto Rican people dwellings and buildings that can withstand a category 4 hurricane.

Even on the mainland, FEMA didn't give the Hurricane Katrina and Harvey victims enough support and money to rebuild with sturdier buildings. And those victims in LA and TX still had to do much of the labour themselves. And they also had a lot of out of state volunteer help and also out of state paid contractors coming in, but again, as I posted before, it's much easier for this kind of helping labour to arrive when all they needed to do is hop in their van or truck and DRIVE along interstate highways to get to the devastated areas. No plane flights were needed.

And what percentage of Puerto Rican homeowners and landlords have homeowners or building insurance on that island? My impression is that most don't, especially in the poorer and more rural sections. Meanwhile, the people on the US mainland HAVE to have homeowners insurance if their carry a mortgage on their property. And so they have paid extra to have this insurance coverage. So it's not like the mainland hurricane and flood victims get that much extra free help. In fact, they've paid extra into the support system between their taxes AND their homeowners insurance premiums.
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Old 07-09-2018, 02:08 PM
 
328 posts, read 198,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post

And what percentage of Puerto Rican homeowners and landlords have homeowners or building insurance on that island? My impression is that most don't, especially in the poorer and more rural sections. Meanwhile, the people on the US mainland HAVE to have homeowners insurance if their carry a mortgage on their property.
I don't understand that either. They don't use mortgages in Puerto Rico?
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Old 07-09-2018, 03:53 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,636 posts, read 37,307,668 times
Reputation: 17517
Quote:
Originally Posted by Branal View Post
I don't understand that either. They don't use mortgages in Puerto Rico?
In the major cities and for the vacation condos, there must be mortgages. But not so in the remote areas.

I read an article on FEMA's frustration with PR on the aftermath of the hurricane. In the US, FEMA only deals with the owners of the property. And it seemed that in the rural areas of PR, home occupancy is not that formal, that there was a lack of formal ownership paperwork. The people just live where they live. So if someone didn't have a title to their land, then FEMA isn't able to deal with them.

In the mainland, FEMA probably interacts with the insurance companies also. So no one is getting extra money to cover the repairs to fix their property.
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Earth
7,667 posts, read 5,088,145 times
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXYEzdmiddI
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Old 07-10-2018, 05:23 AM
 
328 posts, read 198,492 times
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More music videos?
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:00 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,636 posts, read 37,307,668 times
Reputation: 17517
Quote:
Originally Posted by Branal View Post
More music videos?
I guess that it's PR's main industry.

Well then. All of their successful musicians can hold fundraisers to rebuild their island.
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:03 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,636 posts, read 37,307,668 times
Reputation: 17517
Quote:
Originally Posted by Branal View Post
miu, you may want to read this. They had a hurricane in 1998 called Georges. The same things that are happening now happened back then. Nothing has changed.

https://www.nytimes.com/1998/10/27/b...omeowners.html

Quote from the article:

'It never occurred to me to buy insurance,'' said Ms. Davila, 42. ''Nobody ever came to talk to us about insurance.''

She said she did not know anyone who had homeowner's insurance. ''People don't buy disaster insurance because they know the Government is going to take care of them,'' she said.
Well so many of them don't legally own their properties. And being so poor, they also can't afford to pay even renter's insurance.

That last bad hurricane was in 1998? So I can imagine that after a few years of no big hurricane hits, the people would let their guard down and not bother with paying insurance premiums. Or even preparing for a possible disaster.
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,044 posts, read 12,118,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drkness View Post
I agree completely, I think the main issue here is that too many hand-outs are given but nothing much is being done to actually HELP these families.
Very astute.

By analogy, let's take the War on Poverty and the War on Drugs. These "wars" have been ongoing for decades with no apparent success. Why do they continue? There is an entrenched bureaucracy that benefits from these "wars" continuing.

Treating a problem employs many government bureaucrats managing billions of $ of government contracts which employ millions of people. Solving a problem means those self-same government bureaucrats and government contractors would then be out of a job. Thus, the government employees do not want to solve the problem; they want to treat it forever.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:07 PM
 
11,048 posts, read 4,531,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Very astute.

By analogy, let's take the War on Poverty and the War on Drugs. These "wars" have been ongoing for decades with no apparent success. Why do they continue? There is an entrenched bureaucracy that benefits from these "wars" continuing.

Treating a problem employs many government bureaucrats managing billions of $ of government contracts which employ millions of people. Solving a problem means those self-same government bureaucrats and government contractors would then be out of a job. Thus, the government employees do not want to solve the problem; they want to treat it forever.

great point! that's why good people that get elected to office with good intentions get swallowed by the system and nothing gets reform.

Everybody knows Puerto Rico's government is too big and too inept. 78 municipios in an island of 130 x 35 miles is ridiculous but that means jobs and paychecks and those people vote.

Some wise man said that once you give something to the masses is hard or nearly impossible to take it away.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:34 PM
 
11,048 posts, read 4,531,365 times
Reputation: 5236
Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
Well so many of them don't legally own their properties. And being so poor, they also can't afford to pay even renter's insurance.

That last bad hurricane was in 1998? So I can imagine that after a few years of no big hurricane hits, the people would let their guard down and not bother with paying insurance premiums. Or even preparing for a possible disaster.

how do you not legally own a property? Somebody owns a property either a person, bank or government. Houses don't fall out of the sky.

This is not 19th century or early 20th century Puerto Rico where 85% in the island lived in extreme poverty in mud and dirt and didn't know how to read or write. If today you don't have insurance for your property for the min. in Puerto Rico where you get all the time heavy rain, tropical storms, and hurricanes then that's on you and have your priorities wrong or expect the government to bail you out all the time.

Insurance premiums depends on the area (zip code) value of the home and the material of the home......My mom had a 4 bedroom/2 bathrooms cement house in Bayamon, Puerto Rico worth about $135,000 and her insurance was about $100 a year. That's under $10 a month. That was basic and she was on a fixed income.

With all the government aid federal and state we have today if you can't find $10 a month to give basic coverage in Puerto Rico to the roof and things you own due to living in an island that can get tropical storms and hurricanes at any time then you better have a good excuse.....Puerto Ricans spend more than that in beer and food on a weekend and have like 2 to 5 cars in their garages.

Puerto Rico has more cars than people in the island and the stores and shopping malls are always packed so I don't buy the excuse that most are too poor to buy basic insurance....maybe there might be the exception and for those the government and private sector should help but over 85% of the population can pay basic coverage for their home or renter's insurance ......you don't have to get 1 million dollar coverage....just $100,000 or $50,000 so if you lose everything or most of your things you have the basics to start again.
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