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Old 04-22-2019, 11:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
as far as I can tell it is not about Puerto Rican politics. a permanent exemption would work well here.

Then who authorized Enron Corp. to make a 20-year contract with Trinidad and Tobago to supply gas to the South West area of Puerto Rico? nothing with energy gets approved without the Puerto Rican government's giving the green light and without them getting a cut.


Puerto Rico residential electricity customers paid 20 cents per kilowatthour (kWh) in 2017, nearly twice as much as the average U.S. residential customer rate of 13 cents per kWh.
Puerto Rico does not produce crude oil, natural gas, or coal. Nearly all of Puerto Rico’s natural gas is imported as liquefied natural gas, which is imported mainly from Trinidad and Tobago. Puerto Rico produces no coal and imports its coal from Colombia. In 2016, 47% of Puerto Rico’s electricity generation came from petroleum, 34% from natural gas, 17% from coal, and 2% from renewable sources.


if Bermuda and Trinidad and Tobago who have 1/4 of Puerto Rico's economy can have their own LGN tankers, why can't Puerto Rico? The Jones Act doesn't prevent Puerto Rico from owning those tankers and pick up natural gas wherever they like.
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Old 04-22-2019, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Philly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellion1999 View Post
Then who authorized Enron Corp. to make a 20-year contract with Trinidad and Tobago to supply gas to the South West area of Puerto Rico? nothing with energy gets approved without the Puerto Rican government's giving the green light and without them getting a cut.
not sure what your point is here since the gas is shipped from a foreign port not a domestic port.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellion1999 View Post
Puerto Rico residential electricity customers paid 20 cents per kilowatthour (kWh) in 2017, nearly twice as much as the average U.S. residential customer rate of 13 cents per kWh.
Puerto Rico does not produce crude oil, natural gas, or coal. Nearly all of Puerto Rico’s natural gas is imported as liquefied natural gas, which is imported mainly from Trinidad and Tobago. Puerto Rico produces no coal and imports its coal from Colombia. In 2016, 47% of Puerto Rico’s electricity generation came from petroleum, 34% from natural gas, 17% from coal, and 2% from renewable sources.
right, and one of the reasons is there is no domestic LNG shipping which prevents the island of buying cheap LNG from the US mainland. New England power is also more expensive, something like 19 centers per kWh, and it has not natural resources and thanks to NYS, there is no pipeline....as a result they actually buy gas from trinidad

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellion1999 View Post
if Bermuda and Trinidad and Tobago who have 1/4 of Puerto Rico's economy can have their own LGN tankers, why can't Puerto Rico? The Jones Act doesn't prevent Puerto Rico from owning those tankers and pick up natural gas wherever they like.
does bermuda produce their own tankers or does it buy them on the open market? Aside from the fact that PR is trying to get out of owning energy assets they are not free to buy LNG ships on the open market.
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Old 04-22-2019, 02:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
not sure what your point is here since the gas is shipped from a foreign port not a domestic port.

My point is the Puerto Rican Energy Commission (Government Agency) is the only authority that decides which energy company does business in the island and how. They authorized the 20 year contract from Enron Corp. for Trinidad and Tobago to supply gas to the South West area of Puerto Rico. We don't know the bidding process and if that's the cheapest gas they could get since the government of Puerto Rico is not transparent.


Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
right, and one of the reasons is there is no domestic LNG shipping which prevents the island of buying cheap LNG from the US mainland. New England power is also more expensive, something like 19 centers per kWh, and it has not natural resources and thanks to NYS, there is no pipeline....as a result they actually buy gas from trinidad

that's not true. Crowley, based in Jacksonville, Florida has more than 32 megawatts of LNG supply contracts in Puerto Rico, especially to pharmaceutical companies and food and beverage manufacturers.


https://www.bizjournals.com/jacksonv...lng-trade.html


https://puertorico.crowley.com/en/?g...xoCpcIQAvD_BwE
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Old 04-22-2019, 08:15 PM
 
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I don't understand your argument and the ones from the NO Jones Act crowd.. You argue that you want Puerto Rico to be available to get fuel from foreign countries in foreign ships because is cheaper but complain that American Gas is cheaper.


Well, Puerto Rico has a 20-year contract authorized by the Puerto Rican government to Enron Corp. that brings Gas from Trinidad and Tobago to Puerto Rico.........but that's not good? I thought the whole argument from your side is that you want Puerto Rico to do commerce with the rest of the world without Daddy's permission?



but you can also get American Gas directly from Florida using American ships as Crowley does for Puerto Rico.



So my question is what's the problem?......you want to get American gas to Puerto Rico but want to use foreign ships and foreign crew since P.R. doesn't want to be in the boating shipping business? is that going to make the gas cheaper in P.R.?
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Old 06-24-2019, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Philly
10,098 posts, read 15,271,198 times
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https://townhall.com/columnists/phil...-rico-n2548844
Quote:
LNG exports from the United States are booming, and, in 2017, after 60 years of being a net importer of natural gas, we became a net exporter. Ships are leaving American ports loaded with LNG for countries all over the planet, but they cannot deliver to Puerto Rico, specifically because it is part of the United States... "of the 478 LNG carriers that currently exist in the world, none are Jones Act eligible...It is unlikely that an American company will build a Jones Act-eligible LNG carrier... The Government Accountability Office found that, because no LNG carrier has been built in the U.S. since 1980, a U.S. shipyard undertaking such a project would have to bring in foreign labor, specifically "250 to 300 skilled Korean workers for the duration of the build time to ensure the work is done correctly."

In the absence of a waiver, natural gas exports to foreign markets will keep booming, but Puerto Rico, an American territory, will be left out and forced to buy more expensive LNG from Trinidad and Tobago
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Old 06-24-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Trump was reportedly considering a Jones Act waiver for LNG shipments to Puerto Rico and the Northeast/New England but decided against it after meeting with Republican senators and congressmen from Mississippi, Alaska, and Louisiana. The GOP has gone socialist and now believes in protectionism and a planned economy (benefiting red states only).

https://www.nola.com/business/2019/0...n-for-gas.html
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Old 06-27-2019, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Philly
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Jones act just killed a 150 year old refinery that limped along for the last 40 years
Quote:
. "To move crude from the Gulf Coast to a Northeastern U.S. refinery costs $5 to $6 a barrel on a Jones Act ship, but $2 to $3 per barrel to take it to Europe on a foreign-flag ship, Drevna said."That European refinery can take our crude oil, refine it, and ship gasoline back at a 7- to 9-cent differential than what we can do here in the States because of the cost of delivering the crude on Jones Act ships," he said. "That's unsustainable to Northeast refiners."
https://www.inquirer.com/philly/busi...c_vessels.html
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:03 PM
 
529 posts, read 987,114 times
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I decided to return here to see if things have changed, THEY HAVEN'T.

Anyhow, I decided to put My two cents in this discussion.

The so called cabotage laws were put in place to protect American shipping companies. These companies had the highest fees for transporting goods, therefore before foreign companies were used they asked the government for help. Socialism?

Hawaii, Guam, Alaska and Puerto Rico are tied to exclusively use the American Merchant marine which are the highest transport costs in the world.

This obviously will obviously reflect on the final price paid for goods of the captured markets mentioned above.

In terms of Puerto Rico, most of its goods are exported from Jacksonville Florida, which makes this port super dependent on a continuation of the American fleet for transporting goods to Puerto Rico

If say, Congress decided to DISPOSE of its unincorporated colony, the Puerto Rican government can then de decide to use cheaper modes of transport and thus reflex on its final prices.

The problem is that the Jacksonville monopoly will collapse. Then what.
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Old 02-24-2020, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,098 posts, read 15,271,198 times
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https://www.elnuevodia.com/english/e...mpact-2548401/
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Old 02-24-2020, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,098 posts, read 15,271,198 times
Reputation: 2829
Typical leftist approach, we wont allow you to be successful but we will make you more dependent (buy you off)
Quote:
The Vermont senator rejected excluding Puerto Rico from federal cabotage regulations, which are part of the 1920 Jones Act
https://www.elnuevodia.com/english/e...sland-2547047/
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