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Old 12-04-2019, 11:13 AM
 
3,564 posts, read 4,415,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Well, I think in a professional environment they should speak a language everybody understands.
As a fully bilingual Boricua, I completely agree with the above statement. I've worked in Mainland USA for 40+ years. Over the course of this time, I've come across co-workers whom insist on speaking their first language in the workplace, especially when amongst those from their former countries. It most definitely comes across as rude and unprofessional, especially when other-than English is spoken before those whom are not conversant in "that" particular language.

On the flip side, I have been asked to serve as interpreter to Spanish-only speaking Contractors at work. I've accepted the role of interpreter anytime safety is involved. However, when safety is not a factor, I wholeheartedly refuse to provide interpretation services. I am not being paid to serve as site interpreter. If you want such services from me, you will pay me extra for services outside of my job description.

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Old 12-04-2019, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,227 posts, read 16,864,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Last time I checked, the USA doesn't have an official language. It could change tomorrow, but until then it doesn't. Many states do have an official language and there are states such as New Mexico which has two official languages, Spanish among them.

According to Florida, the state has English as its official language. I find it stupid not to include Spanish when it has been spoken there since 1513. It didn't officially became a US territory until 1821 and unofficially since 1818. The entire time not only did descendants of Spaniards (both mixed and "unmixed" types) continue to speak Spanish up to today. That's 506 years vs the 201 years associated to the US and 198 years officially a US territory.

That's not even taking the Natives into account, who's language(s) are even older in Florida.

Point is that Florida (means flowery place in Spanish) has been a Spanish place for much longer than it has been a US place, and Spanish is the oldest European language with only the Native ones being older. There are parts of Florida, especially in the Miami area, where Spanish is virtually the lingua franca. Many places in Florida are named in Spanish (ie. Boca Ratón, Boca Chica, Sarasota, etc). The predominant architecture in Florida is based from Spanish styles (cement walls, stucco facades, in many places tile roofs, etc.; not quite what predominates in places like Hawaii, where the architecture is based on Polynesian styles than Spanish or British ones. Any place in the US that has a Spanish past and in the people usually has a predominantly Spanish based architecture). How can anyone be in Florida and not be reminded of Spain is beyond me, taking into account that the evidence is conspicuous and basically everywhere, including in many people and in the Spanish language they use.
the majority of spanish speakers in florida are not descendants of spanish florida.
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Old 12-04-2019, 11:24 AM
 
17,397 posts, read 12,358,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arleigh View Post
To assimilate into a country it is required to speak the language.
Those who choose not to assimilate are invaders.
Being bilingual was part of the job requirement. Exercising that in conversation with coworkers is just keeping your required skills sharp.

They are already US citizens from a territory which has Spanish and English as official languages. Nothing to assimilate.

Last edited by notnamed; 12-04-2019 at 12:33 PM..
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Old 12-04-2019, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
14,492 posts, read 11,322,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Should US expats be treated in the same fashion in their foreign workplaces?
If I moved to another country, task number 1 for me would be to become fluent in the language of that country and out of respect, I would speak that language.
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Old 12-04-2019, 11:40 AM
 
Location: 53179
14,416 posts, read 22,546,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Should US expats be treated in the same fashion in their foreign workplaces?
Of course....
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:12 PM
 
1,956 posts, read 1,532,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
the majority of spanish speakers in florida are not descendants of spanish florida.

The majority of Spanish Florida are Puerto Ricans, which are AMERICANS.
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:36 PM
 
1,956 posts, read 1,532,082 times
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and they were working at a hospital, where they were told they could speak Spanish when a patient came in that did not speak English.

I worked in the Emergency Room of a hospital for myriad of years, and spoke Spanish all the time, when patients did not understand English. It was not part of my duties, but I did it for free, otherwise the doctors would not be able to treat the patients.....
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
4,617 posts, read 6,425,610 times
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My above post should have read:

Dual language skills has an important place in healthcare....many patients speak little or no english, so the ability to converse in the native language of the patient is not only important, but required . Hospitals employ or hire temporary interpreters.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 12-04-2019, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
10,268 posts, read 15,138,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
the majority of spanish speakers in florida are not descendants of spanish florida.
Maybe… The initial "Spanish speakers of Florida" were people taken from Puerto Rico and a lesser extent from Hispaniola, right? Florida was discovered and named by Juan Ponce de Leon, leaving from none other than Puerto Rico. Chances are high the people affected in the article have some ancestry that connects them to those people (plus other people that arrived later).

Then several centuries later a good chunk of the "Spanish speakers of Florida" immigrated to Cuba where the Spanish flag was still waving in the air.

A century or so later Florida saw the first of several migration waves from Cuba, in the process (and without a doubt) including many descendants of the original "Spanish speaker of Florida." I wouldn't be surprised if many, if not most, of those descendants were completely oblivious that they descended from those people.

Today there are Hispanics from other former Spanish colonies in the Americas that have settled heavily in Florida. Yes, the weather is a draw, the geographic closeness is a plus, but also because the state reminds them of their countries. Hmm, what influence could this be? They are from many countries and yet, they are all reminded of their land while being in the USA. Weird, no?

Last edited by AntonioR; 12-04-2019 at 02:16 PM..
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Old 12-04-2019, 02:12 PM
 
Location: 53179
14,416 posts, read 22,546,258 times
Reputation: 14480
Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
My above post should have read:

Dual language skills has an important place in healthcare....many patients speak little or no english, so the ability to converse in the native language of the patient is not only important, but required . Hospitals employ or hire temporary interpreters.

Regards
Gemstone1
We actually have virtual translators or we call a translating service and face time with them and the patient using an IPad.
But working in a hospital where many patients speak Spanish only, I have picked up Spanish words in order to communicate with my patients.
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