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U.S. Territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, etc.
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Old 09-24-2020, 08:33 PM
 
129 posts, read 95,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
The phrase” island fever “ crops up a lot when discussing so called tropical paradises. I recall even in Oahu some old timers who came from the mainland called it the “rock”. Small island and you’ve seen everything worth seeing and it gets old. You can’t just hop in the car and drive back to the states.
Make friends meet new ppl, go to their houses, like a new environment
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Old 09-26-2020, 11:34 AM
 
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Yes. I like the simple life and I like their culture and food. It's a lot less crowded than Puerto Rico so living in an island doesn't bother me. As long that my satellite gets a signal from the sky for my sports then it's all cool. I was stationed in Adak, Alaska for 2 years so the south Pacific would be an upgrade.
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Old 09-29-2020, 01:07 AM
 
129 posts, read 95,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
Yes. I like the simple life and I like their culture and food. It's a lot less crowded than Puerto Rico so living in an island doesn't bother me. As long that my satellite gets a signal from the sky for my sports then it's all cool. I was stationed in Adak, Alaska for 2 years so the south Pacific would be an upgrade.
What is PR like to live? I am not Hispanic or speak Spanish beyond a few phrases, and honestly I don’t really like like the food that much other than for novelty, although it is rare here, but I don’t like Hawaiian/Samoan food much other than for fun (fried food is sometimes tasty but not healthy). But I used to find the island pretty interesting, mostly because it is a Spanish language territory under American sovereignity. .
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Old 09-29-2020, 03:32 AM
 
451 posts, read 110,591 times
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Originally Posted by DuctTapedToCokeMachine View Post
What is PR like to live? I am not Hispanic or speak Spanish beyond a few phrases, and honestly I don’t really like like the food that much other than for novelty, although it is rare here, but I don’t like Hawaiian/Samoan food much other than for fun (fried food is sometimes tasty but not healthy). But I used to find the island pretty interesting, mostly because it is a Spanish language territory under American sovereignity. .

It was ok living there. Until you move to the states and find the island like the Twilight Zone when you go back to visit. The funny thing is, I know more about Puerto Ricans and the island than the so call Ricans living in states that come to the forum and know little to nothing about them. The Puerto Ricans in the island are a lot different than the Ricans in the states. It's like comparing the Chicanos here to the Mexicans back in the real country. Mexicans know what I'm saying.

The best thing in my opinion is the food. They have many places to eat all around the island. Nobody dies of hunger in P.R. unless they want to. The Chinese food in Puerto Rico is unique and I haven't tasted that style anywhere else. Like when the Chinese people arrived in the island to open shop they learn the Puerto Rican style and their likes and mix it with their Chinese food and it's just unique from the fry rice mixed with Puerto Rican plantains and fried chicken in their menu. I missed that a lot. Then you have the sandwiches Puerto Rican trucks serving tripletas and media noches and they make them at all hours. 3 am eating a tripleta. Even the Pizza tastes different down there. The rest I don't miss which is their government and politics and their public education is bad.

That's why I always question this jibaro statehood push since I was living there. I tell them, let me get this straight, you want to keep Spanish as the main language, you want to keep your own Olympics and Miss Universe, most of you don't feel Americans and the only flag you waive in everybody's faces is the Rican flag. Your own government and locals refuses to teach American Civics in the public schools as mandatory and you want the Americans to give you statehood because? no common sense answer and you just have to laugh and nod your head. I miss other things and others I don't.
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Old 10-03-2020, 04:57 PM
 
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I've never been to American Samoa. I have been to the Northern Marianas Islands (CNMI), which, like Hawaii and Guam, are in the North Pacific. American Samoa is the only US Territory south of the equator.

Both territories have racist land ownership laws, so if you aren't Chamorro/Carolinian, you can't own property in the CNMI, and the same if you are not Samoan in AS. So, that may get in the way of you building a seafood packaging plant or coconut plantation.
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Old 10-19-2020, 10:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
Both territories have racist land ownership laws, so if you aren't Chamorro/Carolinian, you can't own property in the CNMI, and the same if you are not Samoan in AS. So, that may get in the way of you building a seafood packaging plant or coconut plantation.

That is not the definition of racism. That word today is thrown around for anything. They don't want foreigners and corporations buying land to put hotels, private communities and golf courses by exploiting their poverty and push the natives further back and put walls and fences in their own land. The Navajos and many Native Indians have similar laws about foreigners and their land. You are not going to buy in their land. Tribes and minorities have special protections to keep their identity. I'm cool with that.
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Old 11-05-2020, 08:46 PM
 
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I definitely would! My partner and I have lived on Saipan for the last two years, and love it in spite of all the challenges of island life. There really is a lot to see and do, if you’re into nature and ocean activities, for such a small island! The people are super friendly, but it’s true that nepotism and corruption is out of control. The neighboring island of Rota is perfect for such an idea, and we have talked about it many times. It is known for being the most naturally beautiful island. The main challenge is that one would need a decent amount of start up funds to get some sort of business running, and it would need to be an export business since there’s not enough people there to support anything. There is no shortage of abandoned concrete buildings and essentially no industry whatsoever there right now.
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Old 11-06-2020, 12:07 AM
 
2,029 posts, read 1,361,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
That is not the definition of racism. That word today is thrown around for anything. They don't want foreigners and corporations buying land to put hotels, private communities and golf courses by exploiting their poverty and push the natives further back and put walls and fences in their own land. The Navajos and many Native Indians have similar laws about foreigners and their land. You are not going to buy in their land. Tribes and minorities have special protections to keep their identity. I'm cool with that.
It is part of the US, so all US citizens/nationals should have the same right to own land, regardless of their race. Americans aren’t foreigners in US Territories, just as people from US Territories aren’t foreigners when they come to the mainland US, AK, HI, or any of the other territories. If the want to set aside a portion as a reservation that can only be owned by Pacific Islanders, that might be ok (Even though Chamorros, Carolinians, and Samoans aren’t really tribes). But to not allow Americans to own any land at all in a US territory solely based on their race or ethnicity is exactly the definition of racism.
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Old 11-06-2020, 01:45 AM
 
451 posts, read 110,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
It is part of the US, so all US citizens/nationals should have the same right to own land, regardless of their race. Americans aren’t foreigners in US Territories, just as people from US Territories aren’t foreigners when they come to the mainland US, AK, HI, or any of the other territories. If the want to set aside a portion as a reservation that can only be owned by Pacific Islanders, that might be ok (Even though Chamorros, Carolinians, and Samoans aren’t really tribes). But to not allow Americans to own any land at all in a US territory solely based on their race or ethnicity is exactly the definition of racism.

You have to know the definitions of customary land and freehold land. Customary land is owned by indigenous communities and administered in accordance with their customs, as opposed to statutory tenure introduced during the colonial periods.

They are an unincorporated territory of the U.S. which means the U.S. Constitution doesn't apply there. There is a reason for that. They are nationals not U.S. Citizens. The U.S. wants them to keep
their indigenous political system and land rights, compared to what’s happened to Native Hawaiians when they became the opposite from an incorporated territory to a state.


U.S. citizenship is not granted automatically to natives of American Samoa like natives from Puerto Rico, the Marianas (Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands), and the US Virgin Islands. That means to be under the jurisdiction of the U.S. you have to be a U.S. Citizen, they are not. That is not a right for them.


This is what happens when the U.S. makes them a U.S. territory for military purposes and they want to protect their indigenous system. Again, I have no problem with that and that is not racism. If it was, any American could take Samoa to court and force the constitution.
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