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Old 11-05-2020, 10:54 PM
 
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Can you go to Miami as a Third option? You are kind of killing two birds with one stone, plus maybe a better deal.
Panama City is extraordinarily filthy and overpopulated with cars which I don't understand because Panama City is a somewhat walkable city. Somewhat for the simple reason because you are bound to have someone tried to hit intentionally or not. Road laws are respected.
If you're expecting to see a lot of greenery, don't. That is mostly over Costa Rica.
The meals are going to cost you maybe $25-50 per person. Also, there is no Panamanian dish.
The inhabitants are more or less okay. There are a lot of sketchy people who like to play nice with you before they rob you. Just like in Puerto Rico, there is a lot of car theft in Panama, and you decide to rent a car make sure it's in plain view where you are able to see it. Again, be careful with those sketchy nice people who say "I watch your car, I watch your car. Okay? No, problem, I help you, okay." You will be surprised how many Americans fall for that because in their delusional mind "Omg, Panamanians are so nice. I love it, honey." then 30 minutes later "Umm, bae, where's the car?"
Please, pretty please, do not expect Panama, especially Panama City to be this amazing first-world city in a third world country. Panama City is rundown. Yes, there are some renovated buildings that will remind you of Miami, but for the most part Panama City is in decay.
I know you said you're not looking to relocate to Panama City, but you will be there a lot whether you like it or not, especially for documentation. Don't expect them to have your documents on hand nor on the computer. You will have to bring a folder with you everything with copies because they will most likely disappear.
I don't live in Panama, but most of my friends said you have to be extremely careful when finding a realtor or "realtor", when in doubt, try to find an American realtor, not a Panamanian realtor.
Like in Latin American countries, everything is pretty much expensive and not of the best quality.
Crime is rampant all over the country. My best advice for you is to be prepared to rob at gunpoint and don't fight, just give him or them what they want for them to get the hell out of your face.

Puerto Rico is okay. I'm Puerto Rican btw. It's more or less similar to Panama, tbh. Except Panama has more options. Yeah, we have El Yunque but in Panama, you're near Costa Rica plus their forest is bigger than El Yunque.
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Old 11-11-2020, 05:31 PM
 
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Panama
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Old 12-09-2020, 03:51 PM
 
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[quote=Exwyocowboy;59502260]As we now know the cdc is full o'krap. There's no such thing as a rabies preventative. You don't get a rabies shot unless you've been bitten by a rabid dog or cat. Polio hasn't been seen in 40 yrs - even down there.

Exwyocowoy; sorry to tell you this but as a veterinary pathologist, I took a series of rabies 3 vaccinations and an annual booster shot for rabies. Nearly every veterinary pathologist in the United States of America working in a diagnostic laboratory in areas the U.S. where rabies is endemic get vaccinated routinely for rabies. Your information pertains to an era when the only vaccine available was the "Pasteur" vaccine. I hate to say this but you are the one that is full of it!

I do not know how prevalent rabies is in Panama; in the three years that I lived in Panama, I saw only one case which involved a six-week-old kitten that had never been outside the building it was kept in. Apparently, a vampire bat got inside and infected the kitten while it was feeding on the kittens blood. The kitten was brought to me because it had bitten and scratched the owners daughter a few days before it died. Most case of rabies in animals go undiagnosed unless the infected animal happens to bite someone.
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Old 03-12-2021, 02:08 AM
 
446 posts, read 364,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
I
Do you understand that not only Puerto Rico has higher salaries than Panama but they are under the social protections of the United States? You really want to go into details that Panama doesn't come anywhere near that? Do you want me to list the federal programs that Puerto Rico gets from the U.S. that Panama doesn't from education, health, business and housing and the rest of the federal aid they get?
The reality is that almost anyone looking to move to Puerto Rico from the mainland United States has a specific angle (the Tax Acts, a relationship, family, etc). Otherwise, the things you cite are precisely why someone would choose Panama, the DR, or another foreign country over Puerto Rico. After all, if you're going to move to a Spanish speaking tropical location, why would you go to some place that brings along all the disadvantages of home?
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Old 03-12-2021, 10:07 PM
 
589 posts, read 142,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Movingrightalong... View Post
The reality is that almost anyone looking to move to Puerto Rico from the mainland United States has a specific angle (the Tax Acts, a relationship, family, etc). Otherwise, the things you cite are precisely why someone would choose Panama, the DR, or another foreign country over Puerto Rico. After all, if you're going to move to a Spanish speaking tropical location, why would you go to some place that brings along all the disadvantages of home?
because P.R. is USA and Panama and DR are not. Americans going to Panama and DR as tourists in private resorts is not the same thing as living in the real Panama or D.R. and dealing with their government, corruption and poverty.


The average monthly salary in P.R. is 2,014 and in D.R. is $375. The average interest rates in P.R. is 4% and in D.R. in 12.5%. Gasoline in D.R. is 40% more expensive than P.R. and D.R. inflation is double than P.R.. The purchasing power in P.R. is 65% higher than D.R.
Let translate those numbers to the average person not these millionaires who can buy out Dominican politicians and exploit their cheap labor. You make 80% less in D.R., you pay 40% more in gas and you pay 3 times the interest rates. That means buying a house, car or opening a small business is expensive and very hard unless you have the right connections in government.

You know why the interest rates are high in a place? the investors believe their is a higher risk of not paying the loan back across the board in the whole country. Unstable government, corruption, unstable economy, crime and other factors. If Americans are forced to pay 12%+ interest rates we would go into a depression and then a revolution.

Let's cut your salary by 80%, raise the gas by 40% and triple your interest rates and see if you are moving to that system. The only Americans going to D.R. is to buy their cheap labor from U.S. sources. $1 dollar = 57.30 Dominican pesos.
This is just economy. Add the federal aids in many phases that U.S. citizens qualified just for being a U.S. citizen on U.S. territory from education, medical, food, housing and business aids that you don't qualify living in Panama or D.R. I really doubt the D.R. or Panama governments will give you grants and guaranteed low interest loans to open a small business for foreigners. You know what is guaranteed loans? it's loans that the U.S. federal government will back up so investors can give out low rate loans. Panama or D.R. won't do that for you. if you don't have money to invest in their country, they don't want you.

That's the reason the interest rates in P.R. are lower and salaries are higher than the Latin countries counterparts.
If $$$$$ and economical incentives doesn't convince you for Puerto Rico over Panama or DR then I don't know what to tell you. Unless you want to buy cheap labor in those countries from American sources the I don't see the incentive for me as a U.S. citizen.

I'm not going to cut my salary by 80%, pay 40% more in gas and triple my interests and cut my purchasing power by 65% and give up my U.S. jurisdiction and protection just to have the same tropical climate and hear Spanish and eat good food . I get that in P.R. with so many advantages.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,102 posts, read 38,624,513 times
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Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
Yes, Puerto Rican tend to speak fast like East Coast English and they tend to use the silent "r" as a short cut but is not any different than Mexican style which it sounds to me like they are singing or trying to extend the words longer.
What's the silent "r"?

Is that no trilling of the 'r'? Or does that mean they just don't pronounce the 'r' at all?
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Old 03-15-2021, 11:29 AM
 
589 posts, read 142,477 times
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
What's the silent "r"?

Is that no trilling of the 'r'? Or does that mean they just don't pronounce the 'r' at all?
funny, all Latin countries have accents and speak a particular way. Go try watching tv programs from Spain as a non-Spaniard and try to keep up without the subtitles. Good Luck. Is like trying to understand Ozzy Osbourne speaking English and he is English. You be like Brad Pit in the movie Snatch. "What the hell he said?"

Everyone thinks their own native language is the best way to pronounce things until outsiders think otherwise.


Puerto Ricans speak fast and use the silent "R" (it's there but you don't hear it because it's spoken fast)and mix English words with Spanish (U.S. territory for over a century) but they don't sing the words like a bad tune like Mexicans or other Central America countries do. Puerto Ricans understand each other and it has work for centuries for them. If you move to Puerto Rico and are around them, you will pick it up their Spanish quick. It's not that hard to learn like somebody wrote here.


My cousin is Puerto Rican and he is a Mormon. He did a 2 year mission in Guatemala. When he came back he talked like a Guatemalan not a Puerto Rican. It took him like 6 months to get rid of the accent and their words back in Puerto Rico because it's not the culture in the island. If you want the natives to understand you and make friends and get jobs , you better learn how the natives speak. It was funny. Reminds of Madonna trying to be British with their accent when she lived there for a few years but she sounded fake and full of herself. I couldn't recognize by cousin over the phone when he came back. The accent, the tone, the words but Spanish is Spanish, if you learn the language from any country you could have a conversation with other Spanish speakers regardless from what country.
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Old 03-15-2021, 11:59 AM
Status: "Hello there..." (set 22 days ago)
 
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It's rather easy to identify someone as Puerto Rican or at least lived for a long time in Puerto Rico basically immediately as they start speaking. The Puerto Rican accent is very unique (as are all accents) and very particular to that island.

Within the Puerto Rican accent is the peculiar pronunciation of the 'r,' only heard among Puerto Ricans. Supposedly, there is a French connection to that pronunciation as many French that settled on the island couldn't pronounce the Spanish 'r' and it became a general way of pronouncing the letter. I think that is debatable, because neighboring Santo Domingo and Cuba, in addition to Mexico, were other Spanish territories that received many French too. If the French are responsible for how the 'r' is pronounced in Puerto Rico, that letter should had been pronounced the same in those three places too, yet Puerto Rico is the only place where that is done.

By the way, unlike English the Spanish language is regulated by the Real Academia Española (RAE) with chapters in every single Spanish American country and even in Puerto Rico, but its main branch is in Madrid, Spain. According to the RAE, all accents of Spanish are correct. Anyone that thinks one Spanish is more correct than others simply doesn't know what they are talking about. Some accents sound more beautiful, but none is incorrect. So, Puerto Rican Spanish is as correct as any other Spanish accent.

Last edited by AntonioR; 03-15-2021 at 12:11 PM..
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:22 PM
 
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My wife is good in recognizing what country they are speaking from just how they speak Spanish. I mean, watching a lot of tele-novelas all her life from different countries helps. I know maybe 5 or 6 but she knows the different accents within the country and region. Spain, Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, Rican and Argentinian are easy to me but when you get in regions within the country that's where I'm lost unless they tell me. A Mexican that lived in the South of Mexico near the border of Guatemala told me their culture and accent is way different than Mexico D.F. That they are way closer to the Guatemala culture than the Federal District up North. He basically told me he doesn't like Mexicans from the F.D. and it's mutual. They call them "Chilangos" and is not a compliment.


I agree, Spanish is very regulated and has so many grammar rules. I forgot some rules since I have been in the states for over 30 years but the Spanish teachers in the schools in P.R. are good. From 1st grade all the way to 6th grade they hit you hard everyday. They even put the rules on the walls as posters and cards and that's what you see everyday as a student for 6 years. That's where you learn the rules of the words and where to put the accent in Spanish words. Spanish has lots of accents and rules from llanas, agudas, esdrujulas and my favorite sobresdrujulas (being sarcastic) by the way, there are accents in sobresdrujulas and esdrujulas on the first letter "u". Sobresdrújulas. My Spanish teachers would circle my papers and tests with big circles and the word: NO! if I missed an accent in a word or a comma and write me a note on the side with the rules or some sarcastic comment. They didn't like any student missing accents or commas in the words. A few of them lived for that and always had a big red marker with a string around their necks. They didn't like other colors but red. Of all the subjects in school in Puerto Rico, the Spanish teachers took their jobs very serious compared to the other subjects. The English classes were as a second language so they were more relax and most of the time they spoke Spanish in the English classes. Spanish teachers were hardcore.



It helps as a student when in the public schools the teachers made all the students write the material from the chalk board since we didn't have enough books so the teachers wrote the material on the board for the students to copy it on their notebooks and then cover the material the same day or the next. We hated it at the time but looking at it back it works. You learn the Spanish grammar rules while you practice your handwriting both ways, in regular and in cursive. Today, schools are not teaching cursive. They are going away from that. It's sad but that's another topic.

'
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Old 03-16-2021, 10:24 PM
 
589 posts, read 142,477 times
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Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post

Within the Puerto Rican accent is the peculiar pronunciation of the 'r,' only heard among Puerto Ricans. Supposedly, there is a French connection to that pronunciation as many French that settled on the island couldn't pronounce the Spanish 'r' and it became a general way of pronouncing the letter. I think that is debatable, because neighboring Santo Domingo and Cuba, in addition to Mexico, were other Spanish territories that received many French too. If the French are responsible for how the 'r' is pronounced in Puerto Rico, that letter should had been pronounced the same in those three places too, yet Puerto Rico is the only place where that is done.

I don't buy it. After the crown in Spain ordered the Royal Decree of Graces of 1815, which allowed non-Spaniards Europeans to move to the island as long that they swore loyalty to the crown and Catholic church. Many Europeans came from France, Italy, Germany and Ireland. The decree was written in English, French and Spanish. French weren't the only Europeans in the island or the majority. So it's a long shot to suggest that they change the pronunciation of a letter and all of the other groups followed. It will make sense if only Puerto Ricans from a specific region that the French were the majority or close speak the "r" differently from the rest of the island but that's not the case.


By the way, half of my family are French all the way back to the 17th century. If you google the white pages in Puerto Rico, you will find many European last names that are not Spanish. My French side of my family are Boyer, Betancourt, Girod, Lebron. My Spanish side is Sanchez and Morales. I went to school in P.R. with Fraticelli's, Natali,'s Cardi's (Italian immigration) and other parts of Europe outside of Spain. I had a Rieckehoff (German) in my class in H.S. and he was 100% Puerto Rican with the whole family from generations and nobody spoke German in the family. They were all white skin and light hair. Puerto Rico has a deep history of European immigration and the particular towns in the island they settled.
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