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Old 12-21-2020, 01:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
Is Yaucono made from Puerto Rican beans? Is it pure arabica or does it have robusta in the mix?
As for Seattle, I think Starbucks hurt the city’s reputation for good coffee, mainly by burning their beans.

That's a good question. I haven't been to Yauco's factory for over 30 years. I remember they made their own beans when I was there in 1985 (what I was told) but 30 plus years changes and I wouldn't be surprised if they outsource the beans with the economy and the hurricane and economy. I will find out.



Starbucks is just a huge marketing chain. Amazon comes from Seattle, same mentality of mass production. I avoid Starbucks. I like going to local independent shops that the people know about the beans and coffee they sell and you can grill them and they know their stuff unlike Starbucks. My last duty station was in Seattle during my discharge in the Navy. I went to a lot of local coffee shops and I thought I knew about coffee until I got to Seattle and I didn't. You walk into a shop and it's like another world. You had this woman owner in downtown that told me how to grind it, stir it and even smell it and what to look for and what separates the excellent ones to good ones to average to mediocre ones. Reminds me of the wine drinkers. The different kinds of beans, different tastes and the different machines to grind it and make the different drinks. Real Coffee lovers will spend over $500 to $1,000 (I seen over over $2,000 and above ) on coffee machines to grind and make their perfect coffee. In Puerto Rico most buy your cheap coffee maker pot and drink the same coffee all their lives. Not in Seattle. Even the machines they are particular. It's just another world up there. I don't know if its because it's always raining up there and they are always in the mood but it's something else. Seattle the city is special.

Last edited by SanJuanStar; 12-21-2020 at 01:29 PM..
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Old 12-21-2020, 03:30 PM
 
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What is the traditional PR way of making coffee?
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Old 12-21-2020, 10:10 PM
 
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This is what I grew up with and most people I knew in the island (nothing wrong, you will get good coffee if the beans are fresh and good water helps.). But I want this . My friend has one and it's just sick. He drinks a lot of coffee and shows off when I come over with all the drinks this machine makes. I thought I knew about coffee until I got to Seattle and that crowd. It's like a religion for them.




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Old 12-21-2020, 11:47 PM
 
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How about Cafe El Morro?
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Old 12-22-2020, 12:38 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
How about Cafe El Morro?

I seen it in a few places but I don't think I have tasted it unless it was served to me by others and I didn't know. Yaucono, Cafe Crema and Cafe Rico sells the most in the island. When I went to the store to buy coffee for the family in the island it was Yaucono and Cafe Crema a distant second. I know there were other coffee brands in the Super Market shelves but we stuck with Yaucono.They have Cafe Coqui also and other brands.



You are familiar with Puerto Rican coffee.
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Old 12-22-2020, 08:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
I seen it in a few places but I don't think I have tasted it unless it was served to me by others and I didn't know. Yaucono, Cafe Crema and Cafe Rico sells the most in the island. When I went to the store to buy coffee for the family in the island it was Yaucono and Cafe Crema a distant second. I know there were other coffee brands in the Super Market shelves but we stuck with Yaucono.They have Cafe Coqui also and other brands.



You are familiar with Puerto Rican coffee.
Only based on what I read on the Internet. Years ago, a Puerto Rican woman lived in my town. She wasn’t here long. I visit her at her and she fixed me some strong coffee.
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Old 12-22-2020, 10:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
Only based on what I read on the Internet. Years ago, a Puerto Rican woman lived in my town. She wasn’t here long. I visit her at her and she fixed me some strong coffee.

Cuban and Vietnamese coffee are very strong. Cuban coffee is similar to Italian espresso. Vietnamese is a little stronger than Cuban in my opinion.

Last edited by SanJuanStar; 12-22-2020 at 11:00 AM..
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Old 12-22-2020, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Philly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
What is the traditional PR way of making coffee?
the dirty sock

my own two cents:
best PR coffees:
honestly, there are many good smaller brands and it's worth experimenting. Yaucono is solid, after maria they began mixing in imported beans out of necessity, I think it is back to being made in PR (we switched and buy it infrequently now). alto grande still makes good coffee (think it's the same parent company as yaucono these days) as does hacienda san pedro. if you are looking to get good PR coffee stateside, I recommend https://www.puertoricocoffeeshop.com/
due to the flat shipping rate it pays to order large quantities but the selection is good and the people are really nice.

what's wrong with the industry?
PR is like India from what I gather in this thread. the coffee is high quality but not enough is produced to export much. places like folgers and maxwell house are not interested in high cost PR coffee which itself isn't a bad thing.
1) Roads. Roads in coffee country are horrendous making shipment by truck challenging. too small for big trucks and the roads are slow, especially from much of coffee country to the port of ponce, the nearest port. This makes an already uncompetitive industry less competitive.
2) minimum wage laws. workers are paid far more than in most coffee countries. this isn't necessarily bad but it puts the island at a competitive disadvantage that, when combined with the other factors, is debilitating. that said, IMO, with a focus on fair trade coffee, PR should be able to compete in that market since Pr coffee is essentially synonymous with fair trade but...
3)there is a huge deficit of knowledge about Puerto rican coffee. if you look at a old street pictures of places like Philadelphia and NYC from the early 20th century you will see places proudly advertising Porto Rico coffee. at some point it went from association with high quality to unknown. the island's coffee industry needs something like visit PR to advertise and educate, even knowledgeable baristas are ignorant. I've had them recomend brazilian coffee as a substitute, they're nothing alike.
4) the island is a terrible place to run a business and it rubs off on coffee

positives:
1) PR coffee roasters received a grant in the fortuno days to modernize. it has worked and you can now get yaucono in a lot more places than previously.
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Old 12-22-2020, 11:10 AM
 
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If Hawaii can can grow and sell coffee profitably, PR can, too.
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Old 12-22-2020, 11:11 AM
 
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When Puerto Rico switched from an agriculture economy to an industrial developed economy these are the consequences. Labor laws and being under federal law and American protection is good overall but it put Puerto Rico at a huge disadvantage with our Latino friends in the coffee department and agriculture department to compete in the open global market. Add the small size. Puerto Rico is not the only place with good agriculture weather or the only place that knows to grow beans.


They produce enough beans to satisfy the locals and that's good. Don't expect for them to take on the big boys in the global market. Apart from Puerto Ricans, I have never heard non-Puerto Ricans say "I need to buy Puerto Rican coffee. It's the best. I will pay whatever to buy it", not even from my Latinos friends say it. Puerto Rico is known more for Rum to Latinos than coffee.
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